Author Topic: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2  (Read 10449 times)

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Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« on: September 30, 2005, 02:28:18 PM »
Wooltonian brings us the second part of his great series looking back at Liverpool in the Twenties. Everton and Preston are the first opponents for the Mighty Reds:

I've taken the basis of every match from the Football Echo of the time. Football Echo reports are available in Liverpool Record Office, Central Library, William Brown Street, Liverpool. So the next time the missus has you on a down town walkabout, or leaves you stood outside "Solly", go and get a copy of a match report and find a watering hole to read it.

Match 1

Timeline
Grandad Peter was 12 years old. Garston & Woolton Reporter shuts down. Music of the Day: click here

David Ashworth becomes Liverpool manager.



Jack Robinson, England’s foremost musical saw expert, moved to Liverpool during the 1920s. As well as being a hairdresser he was the first Englishman to play the musical saw professionally. He lived in Solway Street, off Lodge Lane, Liverpool 8, where he owned a barber’s shop.

Jack played many different stringed instruments, but the musical saw was his speciality. During the ballroom boom of the 1920s, Jack would perform solo and with orchestras at many different venues across the North West. These included Harry Wood’s Grand Band at The Palace and with Bert Pearson’s Band at Reece’s Ballroom in Liverpool. 

1920 Everton vs Liverpool

Headline of the Day
"Liverpool's Astounding Goals at Goodison"

Liverpool Line up

Goal Keeper
Scott

Right Back  Left Back
Longworth  McKinlay

Right Half   Centre Half   Left Half
Lacey      W Wadsworth Bromilow

Right Wing    Inside Right    Center Forward    Inside Left    Left Wing
     Sheldon        Forshaw            Johnson         Chambers     H Wadsworth



Lucas was a doubtful starter for today’s game as announced in the early additions of the “Echo”. It appears that he had picked up some nasty knocks and therefore Longworth had to be in readiness in case the little man had to drop out of the side.

Goodison Park looked a study. The gate was probably the best ever seen. Although it is difficult to estimate, the crowd looked like it had exceeded 50,000 and the receipts are almost certain to have touched £4000. It was a fine day and a fine crowd and at 2.45pm the only space unoccupied was at the very ends of the various stands.
 
The band of the Heswell Nautical School played a selection of tunes prior to the start. At the Bullen’s Road corner, the crowd was so dense that it swayed dangerously and a break through to other areas looked a distinct possibility. Extra police were drafted in to this corner and the entrances to this part of the ground were closed.

An official of the club told the Echo reporter that this was the biggest crowd he had ever seen on the ground.  When the teams appeared it was noticed that Longworth had returned to captain the Liverpool side in the absence of Lucas. Downs won the toss and set Liverpool the task of facing the sun, but there wasn’t much to be gained as the sun’s power was very slight.

Liverpool made the first attack and Forshaw was kept out when nearing the Everton goal area by a fine tackle from Brewster. Downs had to reply to another good effort from the Liverpool forwards, when Chambers broke forward from a neat through ball by Bromilow. Everton’s first break ended with Reid’s cross hitting a poor fellow on the back row of the terraces after a clever move which had seen him pass both Lacey and Longworth.

Peacock had the first clear shot at goal and it came from a throw in which W. Wadsworth failed to check, but the shot went over the crossbar and once again hit the unlucky fan on the back row. At the right hand side of the Rice Lane terraces the swaying of the crowd was so severe that to relieve the pressure, a large number of fans were allowed inside the barrier.

So far the play had been keen, good and fast, but as yet neither side really settled down to a rhythm. The best moment came in the next minute when a nice solo run by Johnson enabled him to put Chambers into possession at a favourable moment and the inside man drove in a terrific shot that struck the outside netting. Chedgzoy was applauded by both sets of fans for some capital play although McKinlay was alert enough to utilise the effort. Sheldon came into the picture at this moment and his pass to the left was with a good idea, although it brought nothing tangible.

Liverpool pressed hard and the forcefulness and weight of Chambers had it’s effect, when he made an opening for himself in spite of him being surrounded by three opponents. He was loudly applauded by all sections of the ground for this fine effort on the Everton goal and before the ball was finally cleared, Fern gave another corner. Forshaw rose magnificently and headed toward goal and Bromilow finished up the move by toe-ending the ball outside the left hand post.

There was no denying the fact that Liverpool were playing excellently and their continued pressure on the Everton goal was only the natural result of their fine preliminary work. Sheldon forced a corner off McDonald and Bromilow dropped a ball dangerously near the Everton goal line. Downs got the better of a duel with Chambers and brought off a capital clearance just after Peacock had been held up by McKinlay. The pace of the game increased as did the noise on the terraces and during the first quarter hour the game must have been a record for fastness.

When Johnson scored for Liverpool at the end of fifteen minutes, the Anfielders only got what they were entitled to on the run of the play. It was a most remarkable goal and the manner of scoring not in the least stereotyped. Chambers made a miss-pass, Johnson got possession a couple of yards from the Everton goal line. It was anything but a scoring position and Johnson appeared to reduce his chances of getting the ball in the net when attempting to beat McDonald. The Liverpool centre forward however, from what apparently seemed like an impossible position, tapped the ball forward and sent it past Fern in a very clever fashion. The amazing feature of Johnson’s goal was that he had had to leave the field of play to make the goal possible.
 
Liverpool should have gone two up when Forshaw broke clear of the Everton defence minutes later, but a fine save by Fern was greeted by applause from all quarters of the ground. Crossley went close for Everton minutes later after some fine work on the wing by Chedgzoy, who had made some delightful runs and well judged centres. McKinlay was very clever in defence, and Longworth, although he did not display the same finesse, was just as sound.

A bad mistake by Longworth rather tarnished his early performance, for Peacock must have scored had he not been prevented from getting the ball when the Liverpool defence was well beaten. Downs was not always true with his punting from goal kicks, and the ball several times skidded in a direction far from what was intended. In attempting to head out a fine shot by H Wadsworth, Downs headed the ball over the cross bar, a risky proceeding, as with a little less elevation. the ball would have easily beaten Fern and would have been one of the finest headed goals in Derby history. Downs was much more satisfactory a moment later, when he replied to a drive from W. Wadsworth with a header in the right direction, which completely cleared the Liverpool attack.

Wave after wave of Liverpool attacks where then dealt with admiringly. If it wasn’t for a Stonewall attitude by the Everton rear guard Liverpool could well have put this game beyond reach. On a rare Everton attack, the ball cannoned off McKinlay to Chedgzoy and the speedy winger, after eluding Longworth, drove in a beautiful shot which Scott handled in masterly style. Scott also dealt with a volley from Brewster when he nonchalantly tipped the ball over the bar.

With the half time whistle approaching, Liverpool added to their so far, solitary goal and to be fair, it was thoroughly deserved on the balance of play. Sheldon took the ball almost to the corner flag, while McDonald hesitated in his challenge. Sheldon centred clean and crisp, and Chambers rose magnificently to head the ball home into the corner of the net. The goal was greeted with raucous applause from the Boys in the Bullens, but other parts of the ground remained silent. Such a shame as the goal was worthy of total adoration.

Half Time Score: Everton 0 Liverpool 2

The first item of interest in the second half was provided by a fine solo by Chedgzoy, which was finished off with a spiffing shot. Only to see Mr Scott clear it up field with a volley which amazed all assembled. Shortly after which Downs sold Johnson an amazing “show room dummy” to end a Liverpool attack. Sheldon had forced the first corner of the second half, but sadly he sent it behind the goal line before it came back into play.

From the next corner by Harrison the crowd were entertained by what can only be described as, an overhead bicycle kick by Crossley, but this was well saved by the agility of Scott. Everton were having their best spell of the game, mainly through the cleverness of Harrison, but Scott was equal to any end product Everton could produce. On one of their breaks McKinlay appeared to handle the ball while on the ground, but this went unnoticed by any of the officials.

At 10 minutes into the second half Liverpool scored their third goal. It was a long raking shot by Chambers and the ball had a tremendous swerve on it, so much so that initially, Fern was heading in the wrong direction. As he appeared to have edged it away sadly he could only reach it with his finger tips and it into the corner of the net it flew at an astounding pace. Two minutes later Chambers was denied his hat-trick, by a mind boggling offside decision by the line official. Fleetwood was clearly half asleep when the Everton rear guard charged forward and sadly Chambers was denied what was a clear goal.

Liverpool’s cleverness and superiority were now very obvious. They permanently “camped” in the Everton half and one was wondering if they had considered setting up market stalls. On a rare Everton attack a fine shot by Brewster was once again thwarted by the silky skills of Elisha Scott, when he pushed the blistering shot onto the post.

The game maintained it’s incredible pace throughout and was far more entertaining than both Liverpool and Everton’s previous fixtures put together. There was more skill, incident and finish in today’s contest and Liverpool’s superiority was there for all to see. Everton’s first home defeat of the season was indeed to worthy opponents. A well known ex-player was heard to say that after that display by Chambers “he must get his cap” and we at the Liverpool Echo would heartedly agree. He was magnificent in every area on the pitch. Today there was not one solitary weakness in the Liverpool side and they were deserved victors.
 
Scott had another magnificent performance and his save from Grenyer toward the end, once again proved he is the best between the sticks. W. Wadsworth gave a towering performance today and I can hardly remember a single instance when Reid had any reward for his efforts. Lacey and Sheldon were magnificent on the Liverpool flank, both complimenting each others style of play. Sheldon had the better of McDonald all game long and it was all to often that McDonald ended the move, by up ending the little tricky winger. Although Chambers was rewarded with a brace today, Forshaw’s tireless efforts kept Fern’s hands warm all afternoon.

Bee’S Comments
The fastest and best Derby game I have ever seen. The footwork, artistry, trickery and combination play was excellent. The game was a credit to all the players who took part. Here’s a hearty handshake to them all. The Liverpool side was full of understanding and awareness and capable in all departments. Lacey at centre half last week, was very recognisable today he was brilliant.

Everton Old Boy’s View
I don’t think I’ve ever seen a faster game between the two sides and I have seen most of them. I thought Liverpool’s dash and superior finish entitled them to the honours today, but surely their second goal came half a minute after the whistle ought to have gone for the interval. Johnson’s goal was a wonderfully fine one and Chambers was a model of good judgement in the air, even with Downs in the Everton team. Chedgzoy was Everton’s star performer, but even he would pay praise to Bromilow’s work. Lacey dominated the middle of the park for the whole game and for this I would award him man of the match.

Casual Comment (by F.E.H)
Two weeks without a tedious railway journey serves to emphasise the great truth of the adage “there is no place like home”. The tremendous enthusiasm both on the park and on the terraces which these matches engender makes one understand something of the joy of life and the tiresomeness of travelling.

And now Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, for the harmless, necessary jingle:

Derby Day ; Derby Day
Once again the rivals play,
Blue on Red and Red on Blue
With a useful shot or two
And a cannon now and then
Just to waken up the men
Other sports may make for good
Stir our spirits and our blood
But our troubles to forget
None has ever been fashioned yet
Since the flood or since the fall
As that with the big leather ball


Editor's Comment
Although there was a good humoured crowd today, there was an occasional rift in the lute of harmony when some mentally deficient person decided to introduce us to a student rattle. Amidst all the racket being made by the said person, why his immediate neighbours didn’t incontinently throttle him is one of those things which as Dundreary would have said “No fellow could understand”.
 
When Liverpool took to the field first and they received a welcome from almost two-thirds of the ground, the question was raised who in fact was at home. It was widely suspected from those present, that the Anfield supporters had started to arrive earlier than usual thus ensuring a majority holding on the terraces. A spokesman from the police said this would be monitored in future meetings to ensure the home side had sufficient space, thus avoiding any necessity for Everton fans to have to stand beyond the barriers.

Waiting for a bus after the final whistle proved a long wait for some. Most decided Shanks pony was a better option.




Match 2

Timeline
Peter 13. Prince's Park opened by the Prince of Wales. Music of the day: click here

Late 1921 and the seeds of the mighty "Transport and General Workers' Union" were laid. It was eventually founded in 1922 with 350,000 members from over 30 separate unions, including dockers, stevedores, lightermen, factory workers, transport workers and clerks. The Union's first General Secretary, and the main architect of the Amalgamation was Ernest Bevin, a carter from Bristol who had become an official of the Dock, Wharf, Riverside and General Workers' Union.

1921 Liverpool vs Preston North End

Headlines of the Day
"Anfield Players' Awakening"
"A Riot of Goals"

Liverpool Line up

Scott

Lucas   Longworth

McNab  W Wadsworth  Bromilow

Lacey  Forshaw  Beadles  Chambers  Hopkin



Many things made the Mersey fixture today of unusual interest and drawing power. Preston’s name carries much with it, but this season by common consent, the team is worthy of the name. There is talent in every line, McCall, Jefferis and Roberts are household names in our city, while Rawlings has made a name and gained fame thus early and Hamilton, not known to us, had been well spoken of.

Liverpool had Chambers and Longworth back to the leading side. Chambers having recovered from injury and Longworth replacing the injured McKinlay. McNab who played at right half for Checkland, is as big as the old X’s man is small. McNab’s physique is tremendous. He has height, weight and determination, and never knows when he is beaten. In addition he has a very strong shot. So Liverpool hoped their side would be good enough to win today, whereas they only drew at Deepdale.

Officials at the club declared that today’s attendance was the best of the season so far, probably exceeding 38,000. It’s worth noting that this was mainly due to Liverpool being undefeated since the opening fixture of the season. There was much fraternising between the players and Elisha Scott received a particular enthusiastic welcome from the home crowd.

There was some fine defence from the rival pivots, when Liverpool kicked off. McCall pulling a centre from Lacey and Wadsworth being equally forward. It was bad luck for Liverpool that when the game had been going but a few minutes Chambers pulled up lame. For a time he was in much pain, but after a rest his obvious agony in his left knee muscles appeared to ease. There was a tendency in the Preston defence to kick the ball far too forward to result in anything favourable and it was from one of these long clearances that Liverpool attacked on the left.

Hopkin received the ball in in own half, feigned a moved to the left and moved inside. Duxbury had no option but to pull Hopkins shirt to stop him from advancing. From the resulting free kick Lacey split the Enders defence and it was only a dash across field from Mercer that stopped Chambers from going through on goal. His frantic punt anywhere saved the situation and settled nicely on the back row of the grandstand. Bromilow saved Longworth’s skin a few times in his early encounters with Jefferis but if it wasn’t for Duxbury taking a divot a golfer would have been proud of on one attack, the home side could have gone one down. It was obvious when Duxbury tried to stand up, that he too had damaged his left knee.

Play was fast and furious and to this point Liverpool were the more dangerous, although neither keeper had been seriously challenged. Speed trials between Longworth and Jefferis and Longworth and Rawlings were worth watching, as was the triangular passing between Hopkin, Forshaw and Beadles. It was one of these moves that led to a cross from Hopkin which Beadles met with a deliberately placed header which went narrowly wide. Forshaw and Duxbury took turns in handling the ball in the next two moves. There then followed two very useful clearances by Longworth, Roberts being the sufferer. Longworth was not so accurate next time and North End were now putting on pressure in no uncertain manner.

The first real sensible and solid shot of the day was made by Forshaw, who had an inspiration to make an instant left footed drive. It was a bonny ball that had the keeper beaten, but it crossed out of the marking. Play stopped shortly after through Jefferis being body charged by Chambers and pitching heavily on his right shoulder. It was only a moment before, that the former Everton man had to skip over a lunging tackle to escape a trailing foot. So he complained to the referee that he was having a rough passage. A third time when Jefferis was tackled and this time with no ceremony by Wadsworth, the referee ignored his plea for more fairness.

From the resulting corner, Lacey controlled the ball on his chest and played a beautiful cross field pass to Bromilow, who went through solo on goal, only to see his shot go narrowly wide. Quinn was the first to really test Scott, but Elisha defied the brilliance of the shot by not only saving it, but catching it. Beadles brought a great save from Fox minutes later. On the next break Hopkin then screwed a shot until it’s neck was dragged off, so much so in fact, that Lacey collected the ball on the opposite wing. But his cross was too deep for the advancing Forshaw. It was a good chance that should have been utilised.
 
After another body check this time from Forshaw, Doolan was left horizontal and the referee had occasion to speak to him, but it was good to note that mainly the game was being played in a perfectly sporting spirit. A break down the left saw Hopkin float a magnificent cross, only for Beadles and Forshaw to get in each others way. Forshaw let Beadles know in no uncertain terms, that the ball was his. Jefferis had continued to be plagued by Bromilow and one tackle saw him retire to the line for a few minutes to recover. In his absence Bromilow gave further evidence that this match was to be his best exhibition of the season so far.

One also had to admire McCall’s methods, whether the ball was in the air or on the ground, he seemed to keep his feet better than most players who were struggling on the slippery surface, after the latest shower. Longworth and Lucas soon warmed to their work and Rawlings and company were hard pressed to make any impression on the game. More of an impression was made by the plate sized divots that were being wrenched from the turf at every tackle. The groundsman would certainly have his work cut out for him at half time.

One was beginning to wonder if there would be any turf left by April on today’s show. The latest yard long scar on the Anfield pitch resulted in a corner for Liverpool. The North End team seemed at sixes and sevens when the cross came in, and when Wadsworth headed into what was believed to be an empty net, only the heroics of Duxbury clearing off the line, saved the break through. Duxbury received his reward shortly before half time, when he was kicked in the chest by Lacey after a Lucas clearance. But unlike Jefferis he did not need the services of an ambulance every tackle.

Half Time Score: Liverpool 0 Preston 0

The first half had been capital and unduly long, the referee playing overtime after several injuries to both sides. Not surprisingly he was the last to appear for the second half. Roberts made a fiery beginning to the second half and a nice combination move with McCall saw the latter following up with a well placed shot, which muddied Scott’s playing attire for the first time. North End had indeed opened the second half in better trim and McNab had to head away a corner which he had conceded through the curiosity of the pitch. Roberts was very near goaling on the next attack and the trouble was not going away for some time. However Liverpool began to redeem themselves, and were encouraged by a swerving shot from Lacey.

It seems impossible to have a goal between these teams without a debate. Then Chambers scored in a remarkable manner. This is how the movement went.
 
W Wadsworth, dribbling well became a forward as he crossed the half way line. He looked very disappointed that a pass he called for was not returned in the one-two manner we have become accustomed to. However the left winger switched the play to the right wing, where Lacey hit the ball so hard that the goalkeeper Fox appeared stunned. Play went on and one wondered how long the referee would allow before he stopped play. Doolan went into goal and actually saved a shot, having to jump over the body of the true keeper, who in his dazed condition stood up and looked about him in bewildered fashion. Liverpool went on with the game and Chambers headed into the net, which was warmly debated by the Preston players but warmly welcomed by the home support.

While Liverpool lined up for the kick off, Preston players were still debating the decision with the referee, somewhat reminiscent of a Debating Society I used to frequent as a youth in college. From this moment on, Preston seemed not to recover and a riot of goals followed. The second in three minutes. The third in seven minutes and the final goal of four only 12 minutes after the first. Each goal was met by a gathering of the Debating Society, yet again. Preston would have done better to concentrate on what we had come to watch i.e. football, instead they spent seven minutes in between goals debating every decision.

The 10 minutes after the first goal is best described thus. Forshaw broke clear after a tackle on the half way line gave Liverpool possession once again. He skipped over the lunging tackle by McCall and fired low into the net.

Preston Debate Society: Discuss the imaginary foul on the half way line.

From the next kick off Chambers took the ball off Woodhouse and played it wide to Hopkin, after a marvellous dribbling class by Hopkin saw him enter the box, he was unceremoniously up-ended by Duxbury. Lucas converted the penalty.

Preston Debate Society: Was Hopkin over theatrical when he crashed to earth from a height of four feet?

A nonchalant kick off minutes later saw Forshaw nip in and sweep the ball once again to the left. Hopkin collected the ball, feigned right, swept left and crossed a magnificent cross that was headed home by Beadles. As the latest debate was convened, Jefferis decided to call it a day and left the park. Chambers who was obviously now struggling decided to join him in an early bath. The balance of the game saw Doolan, Mercer and Quinn taking turns on up ending Lacey. But none of them, even combined could stop him having three great shots at goal. Each time a tackle went in Lacey refused to stay down. The first saw a bullet hit the post. The second saw him hit the cross bar and the final shot was well saved by the semi conscious Fox.

The referee brought the Preston Debating Society and Liverpool’s Football prowess to a close minutes after the last save.

Editor's Comment
I am in no doubt that Jefferis took his ball home, when he couldn’t get his own way. He was very reminiscent of a child throwing his rattle out of his pram. If Fox wants to continue his career as a goalkeeper, he should remember that, getting in the way of a Lacey bullet is not the wisest of moves. Duxbury should consider moving his trade to that of a lumberjack, as he appears to enjoy felling everything in sight.

Quinn, Mercer and Dolan (the left hand gang) should remember, if they’re not good enough on their own, ambushing a skilful player like Lacey is not in the spirit of the game. Hamilton, never have I seen a professional footballer touch the ball less than the referee over the whole ninety minutes. Suggest you join a real Debating Society.

Today’s game was a very physical game played in the best tradition of top flight football. Liverpool won the game through grit, determination and a refusal to go down. Preston would do very well to learn from this lesson conducted by the Anfielders.

© Wooltonian 2005

Part 1 of Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties.
Part 3 of Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties.
Part 4 of Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties.

Next up it's a tale of Meccano, zig zag football and crystal set fever as Everton, Blackburn and Sheffield United visit Anfield.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2006, 03:05:20 PM by Rushian »

Offline Rushian

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2005, 07:04:34 PM »
superb again Karl - really enjoying the series.
If you're going to sign up on Betfair and fancy getting a free £25 on sign-up then use my refer code 749DCNQGK and I'll also get a £25 bonus ;)

Offline Barney_Rubble

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2005, 07:34:02 PM »

Sterling restoration work on Liverpool FC's rich tapestry.

87:13

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #3 on: October 1, 2005, 03:30:57 AM »
Cracking read Wooltonian, Printed this out and sent it to me grandad(86)..he grew up Mill Road/Lodge Lane /Smithdown Rd. Me mum will sit and read it to him as he cannot see much now but he loves all the History of Liverpool...Cheers , I know he will enjoy it as much as I did.

Offline TRF

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #4 on: October 1, 2005, 09:36:23 AM »
Pure Class, Again.
I'll hope to translate both part into russian and put them on my website..., could I Wooltonian?

Offline Yorkykopite

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #5 on: October 1, 2005, 08:56:10 PM »
Superb. Love the detail that Goodison was two-thirds full of Reds - and that the police "would have to look into in future". (Why didn't they?)
"If you want the world to love you don't discuss Middle Eastern politics" Saul Bellow.

Offline WOOLTONIAN

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #6 on: October 2, 2005, 07:28:22 AM »
Superb. Love the detail that Goodison was two-thirds full of Reds - and that the police "would have to look into in future". (Why didn't they?)

You have to remember in these days people paid on the gate hence any crowd had the capability of outnumbering the local crowd.
Something was done in the long term, they introduced tickets, hence home crowd were guaranteed majority of attendance.

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Offline Yorkykopite

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #7 on: October 2, 2005, 10:02:51 AM »
Yeah, but check out telly pictures of the first Goodison derby after Liverpool's promotion 40 years later. Looks to me like the police still hadn't done anything about it!
"If you want the world to love you don't discuss Middle Eastern politics" Saul Bellow.

Offline Jonno83

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #8 on: October 2, 2005, 08:48:55 PM »
another superb article wooltonian
We will rise again...

Offline Jim Price

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #9 on: October 3, 2005, 10:28:33 AM »
A great concept this. Eagerly await the next instalment.

Offline koolkamal

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #10 on: October 3, 2005, 01:35:43 PM »
When I first saw these 20's articles I though eh... might be boring but Im really enjoying it. Thanks, looking forward to the next one. :)
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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #11 on: October 3, 2005, 03:32:19 PM »
Great Read Wooltonian. I  can see where the 2-3-5 formation came from. When I used to play field hockey, my position was 'right half'.
Doubters to Believers

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #12 on: October 4, 2005, 01:32:18 AM »
Wooltonian, absolutely brilliant! It was like being there with my grandad's boots on mate! The imagery that is evoked is superb! If I was to win the lottery on a big scale I would make two films and retire. The first would be the original Red men at Thermopylae, then a true to life dramatization of pre-war and post war Liverpool FC of the actual players from the twenties, thirties onwards through to the fifties and the sixties! Despite everything, they came back to us!

YNWA

I'll shut up now! Please continue. ;)
« Last Edit: October 4, 2005, 01:54:53 AM by Socratease »
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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2005, 10:57:07 PM »
Have you ever wondered why we have the Spion Kop?



The Battle of Spion Kop (Afrikaans: Slag van Spioenkop) was fought about 38 km (21 miles) west-

south-west of Ladysmith on the hilltop of Spioenkop(1) along the Tugela River, Natal in South Africa.

The battle was fought between Boer and British forces from 23-24 January 1900 as part of the Second

Boer War, and resulted in a famous British defeat during the War.
 

The battle


General Sir Redvers Buller,VC, commander of the British forces in Natal, was at the time still

overshadowed by Lieutenant-General Louis Botha and the fate of Ladysmith undecided. Buller gave

control of his main force to General Sir Charles Warren, who would decide to attack the Boers along

two fronts. On the night of 23 January, Warren sent a force under Brigadier General Woodgate to

secure Spioenkop, a rocky outcropping which looked like the key to the Boer right center flank, which

they found virtually unprotected.

When daylight came, they discovered that the plateau they occupied was not in a commanding
 
position and offered little protection. The steepness of the hillside had precluded bringing artillery,

leaving them poorly prepared for the ensuing battle. Being exposed to Boer sharpshooters and

artillery fire from all sides, the British took heavy fire and suffered over 300 casualties, including

Woodgate, and 1653 injuries before retreating that night. The Boers only counted 50 dead and 120

injured.

Although the common English name for the battle is Spion Kop throughout the Commonwealth and its

historic literature, the official South African English and Afrikaans name for the battle is Spioenkop,

which is in common use in South Africa and is the correct English spelling of the borrowed Afrikaans

name; spioen means "spy" or "look-out", and kop means "hill" or "outcropping". Another variant that is

sometimes found is the combination into Spionkop.



The Kop Stand at Anfield Stadium — home of the English football team Liverpool — is named in honour

 
of the battle. The east side of Sheffield Wednesday's Hillsborough, built on a hill, is also called "Spion

Kop".

Similarly, in places like Australia there are numerous hills bearing the name "Spion Kop", presumably

because of their perceived resemblance to the location of the battle in the eyes of returned servicemen.


"The Battle of Spion Kop" was an episode of the Goon Show, broadcast on 29th December 1958

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Offline red20

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #14 on: October 11, 2005, 09:06:14 PM »
Brilliant article many thanks Wooltonion, 
Quote
Quinn, Mercer and Dolan (the left hand gang) should remember, if they’re not good enough on their own, ambushing a skilful player like Lacey is not in the spirit of the game. Hamilton, never have I seen a professional footballer touch the ball less than the referee over the whole ninety minutes. Suggest you join a real Debating Society.

loved that quote sounds like Lacey was some player
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Offline Armin

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2005, 10:54:00 AM »
Another superb installment Wooly.  I'm really enjoying this series.  What do you make of the standard of match reporting in those days in comparison to today?
Well, I don't know what it is, but there's definitely something going on upstairs

Offline Jonno83

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2005, 04:54:16 PM »
whens part 3 out mate?
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Offline WOOLTONIAN

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #17 on: October 13, 2005, 08:09:52 AM »
What do you make of the standard of match reporting in those days in comparison to today?

I've got all the echo reports from the games in the series and they are probably best described as Brief.
A bit like buying, a paint by numbers where you have to colour in to produce something.
You can tell if you look hard enough, humour and colourful descriptions where not high on priority in actual reports.

 
whens part 3 out mate?

Full series has been complete for some time now, SD (Rushian) is using series to fill in the gaps between current matches.
ie International breaks or quieter times.
History is very nice, but it has it's place and should not interfere with current events.

General Comment
I hope the inclusion of music of the day is giving readers a sense of the era.
I still chuckle every time I listen.
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Offline Socratease

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #18 on: October 14, 2005, 01:08:26 AM »
Wooltonian, history forms events - we are just the next episide, if we do not  keep history alive, if we don't learn by past events, we are truly going to perpetuate past mistakes! My approach may seem contentious/unconventional, but we must maintain thinking.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2005, 08:35:33 PM by Socratease »
The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance.

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #19 on: October 20, 2005, 02:15:55 AM »
The music does make a difference, Wooltonian, you had me searching like mad and the old radio shows (as we all know, no tv then)  which was the mass media of it's time, and I found some old songs from pre war (II) for the patients I care for who absolutely love George Formby, Laurel & Hardy (Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia),   On Top of old Smokey, various comedians/ennes and Vera Lynn-(though during the war) 'There'll be blue birds over the white cliffs of Dover', and many songs from Hollywood when they went to the 'pictures'!  Fred Astaire  et al. Bing Crosby was hitting the high notes with his low voice with Bob Hope providing the laughs and a skinny Frank Sinatra was (and still is) the rage with the ladies.   ;)                                                                                             
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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #20 on: October 20, 2005, 10:21:50 AM »
I'm really pleased your enjoying it, part three due to be put up any day now.
May well be a very large chunk.
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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2005, 03:20:58 PM »
Brod,

Have you still got all your hair?

Serously, give us a shout as their's only 16 of us who have ever lived to tell the tale of Hillfoot Hey (Grammar!)... and fuck off Derek Hatton, Blue-Nosed c*nt, who sold off the playing fields and knocked down the fuckin' school in anticipation of Asda.

Will Hay's the groundsman's proud boast (true): third-best playing surface in Liverpool next to Anfield... and Melwood.

Veritas Vincit... my arse.

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #22 on: April 29, 2012, 10:21:00 AM »
Brod,

Have you still got all your hair?

Will Hay's the groundsman's proud boast (true): third-best playing surface in Liverpool next to Anfield... and Melwood.

Veritas Vincit... my arse.

No Bald as a coot since turning 40.
The central arena surrounded by ashtrack was famous for being the most level pictch in Liverpool and the drainage was second to none.
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Offline liverpoollovefc

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Re: Liverpool in the Roaring Twenties: part 2
« Reply #23 on: April 29, 2012, 08:32:23 PM »
Absolutely love the ridiculous attacking formations they used to use.