Author Topic: Jürgen Klopp  (Read 108670 times)

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #840 on: January 10, 2020, 10:55:20 PM »
“I am 100% normal, nothing special,” Klopp said. “This morning, for instance, I woke up, went into the kitchen, made a coffee for my missus, a tea for myself and gave the dog some food. Maybe Pep Guardiola was doing the same, I don’t know. I don’t know if I have any special talent for management either; I just know that I am busy, I am interested, and I have sensational people around me."

More here:
https://www.theguardian.com/football/2020/jan/10/klopp-liverpool-tottenham-record-start
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #841 on: January 10, 2020, 11:15:42 PM »
“I am 100% normal, nothing special,” Klopp said. “This morning, for instance, I woke up, went into the kitchen, made a coffee for my missus, a tea for myself and gave the dog some food. Maybe Pep Guardiola was doing the same, I don’t know. I don’t know if I have any special talent for management either; I just know that I am busy, I am interested, and I have sensational people around me."

More here:
https://www.theguardian.com/football/2020/jan/10/klopp-liverpool-tottenham-record-start

He drinks tea now, remember one of his first interviews he was questioning of anyone could drink tea? He was funny in the PC about where Mourinho used to play in his playing days. Klopp thought he was a goalkeeper when in fact he was a midfielder.  ;D
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #842 on: January 10, 2020, 11:54:06 PM »
What, your joking aren't you?

<a href="https://youtube.com/v/spPKhuJ8kC4" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://youtube.com/v/spPKhuJ8kC4</a>

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I love the ...

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #843 on: January 10, 2020, 11:57:39 PM »
He drinks tea now, remember one of his first interviews he was questioning of anyone could drink tea? He was funny in the PC about where Mourinho used to play in his playing days. Klopp thought he was a goalkeeper when in fact he was a midfielder.  ;D

ha yes! He was saying that when you drink tea in Germany, people think you are ill  ;D  Now he's a total convert to tea, but not as yet with milk...

The thing with Mourinho was funny, apparently he did play in goal in some charity match, which is why he thought he was a goalie, but yeah, he got a journo at the press conference to google it to find out.
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Offline macmanamanaman

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #844 on: January 11, 2020, 02:22:17 AM »
Klopp thought Mourinho was a goalie instead of a midfielder because of the bus formation. Compact, you see. Very compact.
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #845 on: January 13, 2020, 06:29:05 PM »
https://fbwat.ch/1GI9Dxg5OpJ7cGsj


I love him so much it’s frightening
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #846 on: January 13, 2020, 07:28:23 PM »
He went mental at the players after the Le Celco (sp) chance on Saturday.  I don't think ive ever seen him so angry!

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #847 on: January 13, 2020, 07:48:59 PM »
https://fbwat.ch/1GI9Dxg5OpJ7cGsj


I love him so much it’s frightening

Felt a tad emotional watching that,we are so lucky to have him.

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #848 on: January 15, 2020, 09:14:58 AM »
Amusing article this:

https://thesefootballtimes.co/2020/01/15/how-jurgen-klopps-focus-on-psychology-has-evolved-liverpools-players-into-mentality-monsters/

Quote
Raphael Honigstein’s biography of Klopp details how, in May 2004, he was trying to get Mainz promoted to the Bundesliga after two near misses in the previous two years. Ahead of their decisive end-of-season home match with Eintracht Trier, Klopp hung a banner in the dressing room saying, simply: “Jaaaaaaaaa!” It was an effort to go against the German tendency to approach critical situations with utmost seriousness by lightening the mood instead – and it worked.

Haha  ;D


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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #850 on: January 17, 2020, 06:15:31 AM »
Jürgen Klopp's Authentic, Infectious Aura and Ultimate Mission

Jürgen Klopp has Liverpool on course to end a 30-year domestic title drought all while having a unique gravitational pull due to his overwhelming charisma, overlooked intelligence and sheer desire for connectivity.

“HERE HE IS!”

It is a measure of Jürgen Klopp’s popularity that when Megan Rapinoe and Alex Morgan, world soccer stars in their own right, attended FIFA’s recent awards gala in Milan, they did not go out of their way to meet Lionel Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo—but they did make a boisterous beeline for Klopp, the 52-year-old German, now in his fifth season at Liverpool, who today may be the best coach in any sport. At the very least he’s the most charismatic, a fist-pumping force of nature who smothers players in bear hugs after games, which these days almost always end in victory. Entering 2020, the reigning Champions League winners had claimed a stunning 58 Premier League points, winning 19 of 20 games.

“I was excited to meet him, so I just went right up and got in there,” says Rapinoe, fresh off of winning FIFA’s Women’s Player of the Year award herself. “He’s so warm and genuine. I think everyone would say that about Jürgen Klopp.”

That night, as Klopp accepted his own award for the top men’s coach, he announced he was joining Rapinoe, Morgan and 130 other sports figures in Common Goal, whose members donate 1% of their incomes to charity.

“I met [Rapinoe] for the first time that night, and I loved her,” says Klopp. “It’s very important that we have people like her to be a bit chatty about important things. I share 100% her opinion about Donald Trump [with whom Rapinoe has publicly sparred]. That’s easy to do, but you need to have balls to do it in public, in these moments when you win something. Megan and Alex, they were brilliant company.”

The two American stars found out in Milan what Merseyside denizens have known for years, how it’s hard not to feel connected to the gregarious German. In Liverpool, Klopp’s aura seeps into every corner of the fabled port city. Check into a downtown hipster hotel and the elevator door is plastered with a giant caricature of the smiling coach above the word 'BOOM!'

Step into a taxi and ask for a ride to Melwood, the Reds’ training ground, and the driver will inquire in wondrous Scouse: “Going to see the German god?”

Speak to Dutch midfielder Georginio Wijnaldum and he’ll tell you about the day he signed with Liverpool, how he visited his new boss’s home that afternoon and how Klopp barely spoke about soccer.

“Most people just go straight to the business,” Wijnaldum says. “We spoke about our lives, basically. And we still do.”

Klopp rarely idles his drive to forge human connections. When 750,000 Liverpool fans turned out for the parade celebrating the Champions League triumph last June, Klopp swears he tried to hold eye contact for at least a fraction of a second with each person he saw from his perch atop the team bus.

“How much it meant to the people? I thought I knew, but seeing it is completely different,” he says. “You had 60-, 70-, 80-year-old men and women punching their chests, screaming, ‘I! LOVE! YOU!’ Life is all about having that kind of relationship.”

That worldview is reflected on the field, where the key to Klopp’s high-pressing style is to combine the collective talents, desires and energies of players from a wide range of nations into a unit that is greater than the sum of its parts.

So explains Klopp, legs crossed on a white-leather office couch, speaking between puffs on a vape. He’s dressed a bit like a dad going to his kid’s weekend soccer game: black sweatshirt, windpants, white running shoes, no socks. But what stands out above all else in person are his teeth. They’re majestic, like a human Hoover Dam, and they can express multitudes, whether it’s the pleasure of a radiant smile or the “Let’s go!” urging of a sideline gnash or the cackling cocksureness of the cartoon-villain laugh he emits when his team concedes.

This is the morning after another Champions League victory at Anfield, and Klopp can’t help flashing those choppers as he reminisces about one of the greatest comebacks in sporting history. Last May, in the Champions League semifinals against Barcelona, the Reds were staring down a 3–0 first-leg defeat to mighty Messi & Co., which meant their best chance of advancing was a follow-up 4–0 win at home ... without two of their best players, forwards Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah.

“I said two things to the boys,” Klopp recalls. “One, it’s impossible—but because it’s you, we have a chance. And: I want everybody to close your eyes for 10 or 15 seconds. Imagine the best game you’ve ever played. That’s exactly the game we have to play tonight. And then the boys played that game.”

Liverpool had three goals by the 56th minute, including two from Wijnaldum. Ultimately, Divock Origi landed the decisive blow on a trick corner.

“It’s one of the most wonderful stories ever in football,” says Klopp, whose team went on to beat Tottenham Hotspur 2–0 in the final.

But while the Champions League hardware may be the most coveted in club soccer, and while the Reds (who face Atlético Madrid in this year’s round of 16) are well positioned to retain it, it’s also a trophy Liverpool has now won twice in the last 15 seasons. There’s another one, a supposedly lesser one, that supporters want even more. When the team won the English league title in the spring of 1990, it was the club’s record 18th championship, far surpassing archrival Manchester United’s seven. But almost 30 years have passed, and in that time United has won the league 13 times, Liverpool none.

If it seems inevitable that 2020 is the year the Reds tip the scales back in the other direction, with 13 points (and a game in hand) between them and second-place Leicester City entering the new year, remember: These fans have been burned before. Liverpool’s 97 points last season would have been the second most ever by an English team, if not for Manchester City’s 98. And don’t even mention Steven Gerrard’s title-costing slip-up of ’14.

Neil Atkinson, host of the popular Anfield Wrap podcast, enumerates the stakes.

“I’m 38, so Liverpool last won the league when I was 9,” he says. “I’ve got an entire adult supporting life where Liverpool haven’t won the title—and my father has 13 leagues. You’re in this situation where you want one. Just one. That’s the Holy Grail.”

Flash back to the 1980s, when Liverpool won the league seemingly every other year. As a teenager in Milwaukee back then, working concessions at Brewers games for spending money, Mike Gordon never could have imagined owning the storied European soccer club. But there he was in 2001, by then a wildly successful asset manager, joining a Red Sox ownership group led by John W. Henry. Nine years later, that organization (now called Fenway Sports Group) bought Liverpool FC, for which Gordon became FSG’s point man in ’12.

Today Gordon lives in Brookline, Mass., a private-pathway walk from Henry’s mansion. But he spends plenty of time in Liverpool, where the most powerful figure at the world’s best soccer team happily goes unrecognized in a black LFC cap and jeans.

That’s by design. But as intensely private as Gordon is—his interview with SI marked only his second as a soccer exec—he’s also deeply involved. In 2015, after firing manager Brendan Rodgers, he oversaw the process, along with sporting director Michael Edwards and director of research Ian Graham, of finding a replacement. It wasn’t long before they lasered in on Klopp, who in his seven years with Borussia Dortmund had won two Bundesliga titles and reached a Champions League final.

“Analytically, [Dortmund] stacked up very well relative to expected performance,” Gordon says. “I called Jürgen. We had an extraordinary conversation, and it was pretty clear to me by the time I hung up that he was the right person. We arranged a meeting in New York City, had a lengthy discussion late one night and the following day, and it was very straightforward. This was the perfect choice.”

Eventually Klopp stepped out of that meeting so his agent could negotiate terms. The coach, on his first visit to New York, aimlessly walked the streets, burned through a few smokes and then jumped into a golf store to buy a hat. Foreign tourists were starting to recognize him.

Inside, he was quaking with excitement. “I’ve loved this game since I’m 2,” he says, “and that’s what Liverpool is all about, the passion and the love and the emotion. ... I thought about how important football is to Liverpool supporters and the situation they were in”—hovering around sixth or seventh place throughout the early 2010s—“and me wanting to change things.”

Catching up to his new English rivals would be one thing if Klopp had inherited something akin to Man United’s wealth, but Liverpool is hardly Europe’s richest club. The team ranks seventh in revenue, according to the international accounting firm Deloitte, and in recent years has sold off two of its biggest stars, Luis Suárez and Philippe Coutinho, to higher-up-the-money-chain Barcelona. So how has Liverpool made up the wealth difference to conquer Europe?

For starters, the team doesn’t spend for spending’s sake. When the club made no major purchases last summer, Klopp was clear: It’s part of his job to make his own players better. And when Liverpool does spend—like the $48 million dished out to land Salah, an Egyptian forward, in 2016; or the $100 million plopped down in ’17 for Virgil van Dijk, a towering Dutch man-mountain of a center back (and the ’19 UEFA Player of the Year); or the $84 million handed over for Brazilian goalkeeper Alisson in ’18—it starts by identifying targets who fit Klopp’s playing style. He wants guys who can defend collectively all over the field, defenders who can play the ball, fullbacks who can join in the attack and front-liners who can win possession in the opposing end, punishing teams in transition. A transfer committee, led by Edwards, makes heavy use of data to narrow down a list of targets, from which Klopp gives a green light. Then it’s up to him to provide the environment for players to succeed.

Among those who’ve thrived in that environment: Andy Robertson (purchased under Klopp for a paltry $10.5 million in 2017) and 21-year-old Trent Alexander-Arnold (homegrown), the best pair of attacking fullbacks in the world, as well as the balanced three-man midfield of Fabinho ($53 million in ’18), Wijnaldum ($36 million in ’16) and Jordan Henderson, a Liverpool veteran of a decade.

It’s the front three of Salah, Firmino and Sadio Mané, though, that will define this era of Liverpool football. Klopp, who coached against Firmino with Dortmund and who nearly purchased Mané for his old German club, swears he predicted their remarkable chemistry.

“I could see it coming,” he says.

Still, it has taken some of his best management skills to make it work. Take a much played-up incident earlier this season, against Burnley, when Mané blew up at Salah for taking a difficult shot instead of passing to his open teammate. Klopp, says Wijnaldum, is “always trying to solve problems because he can understand why people are angry.” In the days after the game that meant bringing Salah and Mané into the manager’s office—separately, not together, Klopp emphasizes—for heart-to-hearts.

“In the world of football, it looks so big; it’s like, 'Oh, my god, how can you do it?'” Klopp says of the mini-altercation. “But I just spoke to them.”

Before the Champions League final last spring, journalist Raphael Honigstein (who wrote the Klopp biography Bring the Noise) visited Liverpool’s camp in Marbella, Spain.

“The mood was so relaxed; there was none of the usual sort of paranoia,” says Honigstein. “It was like a holiday. Klopp and his staff every night had this long table, and you could hear them laughing and having an amazing time. And I think that mood has carried over into this season. ... They are supremely confident that they are going to be successful, and I think that breeds its own sort of reality. They go down a goal or two, and things don’t change.”

All of this, says Gordon, can leave one thinking Klopp is 100% charisma and emotion, leaving his intelligence and attention to detail overlooked. This is the manager, after all, who hired a specialist throw-in coach, a rarity in soccer; who installed a cutting-edge head of nutrition in charge of team meals; who revolutionized Liverpool’s use of data and video technology, including analyzing in-game patterns to share with players at halftime. At a time when some of the world’s top managers from a decade ago—José Mourinho, Arsène Wenger, Carlo Ancelotti—have failed to evolve, Klopp has updated his approach. At Liverpool, that has meant more than just unleashing the chaos of his high press. Klopp’s Reds now exert control over games too.

“He’s a polymathematical guy,” says Gordon, with whom Klopp is prone to chatter about the Fenway Group’s commercial dealings, for example. “I spent 30 years as an investor speaking to some of the best CEOs in the world, and Jürgen is right up there with them. If he wasn’t managing a football club, he could be managing a Fortune 500 company.”

In December, when Liverpool announced it was extending Klopp’s contract for two more years, until 2024, Reds fans rejoiced, not least because many had assumed Klopp would move on to coach the national team of Germany, which is hosting Euro 2024. Liverpool is a working-class city, but it has bucked the national trend in the U.K., voting for Labour and against Brexit. In many ways Klopp’s extension—coming one day after conservatives had swept to victory in national elections—was seen by many supporters as a momentary balm in a bad-news week.

Much like Rapinoe, Klopp has used football’s platform to call for social change. He is an unabashed lefty, and it’s by design that he has managed clubs, Liverpool and Dortmund, whose fan bases’ politics largely match his own. Each sings the global standard “You’ll Never Walk Alone” instead of any national anthem before games.

Perhaps the greatest testament to Klopp’s charisma is the fact that even in tribal England, where fans tend to turn the most successful opposing coaches into villains, he’s viewed mostly positively. He remains a grinning unifier even as he destroys his foes, even as he wades into the politics of an increasingly polarized world.

Liverpool’s most revered manager of all time, Bill Shankly, was renowned for saying, “Football is not a matter of life and death. It’s much more important than that.” Klopp would never agree. Popular but not a populist, he sees no easy answers in the world today.

“I’m aware of a lot of problems we have,” he says, “and like every person with half a brain, I’m interested in solving them. But I really think we have to solve them together. So don’t separate yourself from the rest of the world.”

“Populists”—and here he fingers Trump and U.K. prime minister Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson—“have historically proven they were never the right solution. They’re telling people the things they think we want to hear. ... As long as we work on our problems together, they are there to solve. We depend on each other, and that’s what we should not forget.”

That could just as easily be Klopp’s soccer mission statement. In the most global of sports, one of the most popular figures has found a giant audience. And what if he can lead Liverpool to its first domestic title in three decades?

“I think it would put him with the Holy Trinity of Liverpool managers,” says Honigstein, meaning Shankly, Bob Paisley and Kenny Dalglish. “He’s taken a club that was lost. To bring them back—to relieve those 30 years of disappointment, that loss of status—I think would be an achievement on par with theirs.”

Liverpool seems destined to clinch its latest English title by late spring, but there’s more to Klopp’s appeal than just winning. The artist Dan Leydon recently designed a GIF that captures Klopp’s complete essence: the manager blasting light beams from a futuristic “good vibes” gun, flashing a toothy laugh. It’s the visual representation of a remarkable achievement, a man completely connected, both mythical and approachable.

https://www.si.com/soccer/2020/01/16/jurgen-klopp-liverpool-manager-aura-connection

"Jürgen Klopp is bringing Liverpool's 'fuck you' back. And I can't wait."

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #851 on: January 17, 2020, 07:09:10 AM »
Brilliant article. Thanks for posting

I reckon I'm a pretty hard-nosed individual. I'm not impressed by celebrities or fame. But I'm unashamed in declaring my love for, and devotion to, Jurgen Klopp. He's incredible. A wonderful, caring, inspiring figure. A humble man who inspires humility in others. And you know it's real. If he hadn't become rich and famous you just know he'd have still been exactly the same; one of those people who made people's lives better and whom others rejoiced being around.

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« Last Edit: January 17, 2020, 07:17:48 AM by Ghost Town »
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Offline jillc

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #852 on: January 17, 2020, 07:56:50 AM »
Fantastic article thanks for posting it.
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #853 on: January 17, 2020, 09:07:03 AM »
Once again just ignoring the football we're just so lucky to have a genuinely lovely human being managing our football club.....we've been blessed in that department over the years.

In retrospect our institution it's values and Jurgen were always a match made in heaven, and with our current ownership and Jurgen along with his team we're very fortunate to have a group of exceptionally talented people proudly representing our club.

Offline naYoRHa2b

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #854 on: January 17, 2020, 09:12:40 AM »
Imagine if Jurgen was your dad.

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #855 on: January 17, 2020, 11:55:51 AM »
Brilliant article. Thanks for posting

I reckon I'm a pretty hard-nosed individual. I'm not impressed by celebrities or fame. But I'm unashamed in declaring my love for, and devotion to, Jurgen Klopp. He's incredible. A wonderful, caring, inspiring figure. A humble man who inspires humility in others. And you know it's real. If he hadn't become rich and famous you just know he'd have still been exactly the same; one of those people who made people's lives better and whom others rejoiced being around.

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This is very much me. When I read about him, I'm obviously made up that he's leading our club successfully, but what comes across every time is what a thoroughly decent, caring human being he is. His interpersonal skills and emotional intelligence are off the scale, apart from when he is asked stupid questions by journos in press conferences.

The maddest thing is that we still get the likes of Dannys Mills and Murphy, keys and gray, Tyler, Neville, Carragher and Hamman telling him what he is doing wrong. Oh and one or two on here, although thankully the online advice corps is not as busy as it was  ;).

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #856 on: January 17, 2020, 12:29:47 PM »
This is very much me. When I read about him, I'm obviously made up that he's leading our club successfully, but what comes across every time is what a thoroughly decent, caring human being he is. His interpersonal skills and emotional intelligence are off the scale, apart from when he is asked stupid questions by journos in press conferences.

The maddest thing is that we still get the likes of Dannys Mills and Murphy, keys and gray, Tyler, Neville, Carragher and Hamman telling him what he is doing wrong. Oh and one or two on here, although thankully the online advice corps is not as busy as it was  ;).

Carragher will be an absolute nightmare on Sky for putting the boot in when we're not as good again (unless it's Gerrard in charge).

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #857 on: January 17, 2020, 12:43:01 PM »
Great article

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #858 on: January 17, 2020, 12:53:16 PM »
Carragher will be an absolute nightmare on Sky for putting the boot in when we're not as good again (unless it's Gerrard in charge).
My life is much more enjoyable without Sky in it  ;D

More seriously though, if you read articles like this carefully, they really do illustrate the skill set that is needed to effectively lead a massive club like ours and it makes pundits' shouts for who they think should be given various jobs even more comical.

Thankfully it appears that Mike Gordon has his previous experience plus his experience of Klopp, to have a good grasp of what is needed.

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #859 on: January 17, 2020, 01:15:28 PM »
Jürgen Klopp's Authentic, Infectious Aura and Ultimate Mission

https://www.si.com/soccer/2020/01/16/jurgen-klopp-liverpool-manager-aura-connection

great piece of writing, that. Thanks for sharing!

What a man he is. What a leader. Paraphrasing the Great Man - Liverpool was made for him and he was made for Liverpool.

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #860 on: January 17, 2020, 02:48:21 PM »
Reading his biography I found out where he got that intense style when it comes to football, his dad was exactly the same by the way he was described in the book.
Always pushing Jurgen's sistsers and then Jurgen himself to improve and be the best they can be.
Does he have a son to instill the same philosophy so we can have a Klopp Mk 2 in 40 years ?  ;D
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #861 on: January 17, 2020, 02:50:41 PM »
Reading his biography I found out where he got that intense style when it comes to football, his dad was exactly the same by the way he was described in the book.
Always pushing Jurgen's sistsers and then Jurgen himself to improve and be the best they can be.
Does he have a son to instill the same philosophy so we can have a Klopp Mk 2 in 40 years ?  ;D

He has two of 'em, both all grown up  :D The youngest did play football for a few years, at lower league level (like 3rd division Germany level). But retired in his mid 20's.
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Offline Sangria

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #862 on: January 17, 2020, 03:20:00 PM »
Imagine if Jurgen was your dad.

Read Vic Gill's accounts.
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http://www.redandwhitekop.com/forum/index.php?topic=267148.msg8032258#msg8032258

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #863 on: January 17, 2020, 06:13:13 PM »
Imagine if Jurgen was your dad.
He kind of is, and if he were, you might be torn between an obvious pride and the horrible feeling that this man who seems to have so much time with the world might not have enough time for you, and that you might have to struggle to ever emerge from his shadow. That said, you kind of get the feeling that's not actually how his kids feel at all. But it's certainly not always easy living close to a blinding light like Klopp's.

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #864 on: January 17, 2020, 07:48:32 PM »
He kind of is, and if he were, you might be torn between an obvious pride and the horrible feeling that this man who seems to have so much time with the world might not have enough time for you, and that you might have to struggle to ever emerge from his shadow. That said, you kind of get the feeling that's not actually how his kids feel at all. But it's certainly not always easy living close to a blinding light like Klopp's.
Surely he stops smiling now and then?
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #865 on: January 17, 2020, 08:28:08 PM »
He kind of is, and if he were, you might be torn between an obvious pride and the horrible feeling that this man who seems to have so much time with the world might not have enough time for you, and that you might have to struggle to ever emerge from his shadow. That said, you kind of get the feeling that's not actually how his kids feel at all. But it's certainly not always easy living close to a blinding light like Klopp's.

At least his sons where already adults by the time Kloppo became the really high profile coach that he is these days!
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #866 on: January 17, 2020, 08:50:59 PM »
“If we can do it, great, if not, then fail in the most beautiful way” is still one of the most inspirational quotes I’ve heard. The mentality is not to be focused on the result, but focused on your own effort. That’s why he congratulated the players on a great performance after losing 3-0 at the Nou Camp. I feel motivated just thinking about things he’s said in passing, can’t imagine what it feels like as a player.
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Offline Sangria

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #867 on: January 17, 2020, 08:59:52 PM »
“If we can do it, great, if not, then fail in the most beautiful way” is still one of the most inspirational quotes I’ve heard. The mentality is not to be focused on the result, but focused on your own effort. That’s why he congratulated the players on a great performance after losing 3-0 at the Nou Camp. I feel motivated just thinking about things he’s said in passing, can’t imagine what it feels like as a player.

Our history is a history of success built on failure. Klopp's history is a history of success built on failure. We share a mentality. We share that mentality too with Man Utd, whatever our rivalry.
"i just dont think (Lucas is) that type of player that Kenny wants"
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http://www.redandwhitekop.com/forum/index.php?topic=267148.msg8032258#msg8032258

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #868 on: January 17, 2020, 09:09:06 PM »
Surely he stops smiling now and then?

His teeth show up just as much when he's losing his shit. ;D

Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #869 on: January 17, 2020, 09:32:35 PM »
The more I learn about him and his take on life the happier I am that he's our boss. A world class man as well as a world class coach/manager.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2020, 09:36:01 PM by simesy »
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #870 on: January 17, 2020, 10:19:43 PM »
Posted before.  Will post again.  And again.

https://youtu.be/GRJEFHzHjL4
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #871 on: January 17, 2020, 11:03:37 PM »
Boss this, covering all our best managers:

Will Klopp’s team become the GLOAT (Greatest Liverpool Of All Time)?

https://www.theguardian.com/football/2020/jan/17/is-jurgen-klopp-building-best-liverpool-team-all-time-shankly-paisley-dalglish-benitez

Quote
So to Klopp. Although Liverpool had not won the title in 25 years when he was appointed, he was taking over a side firmly entrenched in the upper reaches of the Premier League. There was no need to contrive a way of watering the grass at Anfield as Shankly had; the foundations may have been well hidden but they were there. But that perhaps is more significant when assessing the greatness of the job Klopp has done rather than of the side he has produced.

And this is a very great side, one that essentially updates the principles of Paisley’s best team, pressing opponents and then cutting them apart with rapid passing moves. This side are less inclined to kill games but that is the nature of modern football; law changes and the increasing financial disparity between the elite and the rest have made the superclubs more attacking, particularly at full-back.

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #872 on: January 17, 2020, 11:49:09 PM »
Boss this, covering all our best managers:

Will Klopp’s team become the GLOAT (Greatest Liverpool Of All Time)?

https://www.theguardian.com/football/2020/jan/17/is-jurgen-klopp-building-best-liverpool-team-all-time-shankly-paisley-dalglish-benitez


Think Klopp's side this year are quite inclined to kill games, long stretches of possession for control and recovery.

Might not do it as often as Paisley's sides did, but the article makes it seem as though we are still playing heavy metal football.

Not this season, not much at all...
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Offline bravoco

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #873 on: January 18, 2020, 02:53:33 AM »
^Great article, but the Rafa 05 team is definitely the odd one out. The 08-09 team were far more representative of his time at LFC and style of play.

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #874 on: January 18, 2020, 08:45:50 AM »
^Great article, but the Rafa 05 team is definitely the odd one out. The 08-09 team were far more representative of his time at LFC and style of play.

Even the 05/06 team. 82 points after a slow start. Could have won the league that year but Chelsea had won all but a couple of games at this stage.

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #875 on: January 18, 2020, 09:16:41 AM »
Thanks

SNIP

Inside, he was quaking with excitement. “I’ve loved this game since I’m 2,” he says, “and that’s what Liverpool is all about, the passion and the love and the emotion. ... I thought about how important football is to Liverpool supporters and the situation they were in”—hovering around sixth or seventh place throughout the early 2010s—“and me wanting to change things.”

I actually found this part quite spirital, Klopp isn't from this area, he isn't even from this country, yet he is aware of what Liverpool FC means to the supporters and their passion for it. He could very easily have gone to Man United, a club with a similar support and passion for their club and indeed was sounded out by them but didn't feel the same 'connection'. I've always felt lucky and privileged to have been brought up as a Liverpool fan and thinking back now, having being lucky enough to have stood on the Kop has been life changing for me. There have been so many incredible, memorable emotional times shared with thousands of like minded people, when you are there the feelings and intensity of the atmosphere are tangible and its an experience that is hard to come by in any other environment I can think of. Despite Klopp being geographically distanced from that, its alomst as if he felt connected to that strong powerful emotional spirit which is so integral to the club. It sounds like he almost thought it was his destiny to eventually become our manager and he certainly seems to be the perfect fit.     
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #876 on: January 18, 2020, 09:22:25 AM »
Forget the plaudits, the fella needs a song.

For all the wordsmiths, songsmiths and paragraph downhill skiers we have, not a decent verse between them.


Focus on giving him a song. Before you know it, he'll be gone.
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Offline Red Berry

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #877 on: January 18, 2020, 09:33:14 AM »
Think Klopp's side this year are quite inclined to kill games, long stretches of possession for control and recovery.

Might not do it as often as Paisley's sides did, but the article makes it seem as though we are still playing heavy metal football.

Not this season, not much at all...

That's what I thought reading that second paragraph.  Whether it's Barcelona or Spurs you don't hold onto a one goal lead unless you're extremely effective at killing a game.

And that bit about the superclubs being more attacking. Which clubs? Us and City? No other clubs in the league come close to what we do.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

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Offline Yosser0_0

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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #878 on: January 18, 2020, 09:43:13 AM »
Forget the plaudits, the fella needs a song.

For all the wordsmiths, songsmiths and paragraph downhill skiers we have, not a decent verse between them.


Focus on giving him a song. Before you know it, he'll be gone.

Some real hate for the Opus song in here.
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Re: Jürgen Klopp
« Reply #879 on: January 18, 2020, 09:51:41 AM »
Some real hate for the Opus song in here.

Which ones that?

Don't really hear anything that a) sounds good and b) befits the man.
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