Author Topic: Doping In Sport..  (Read 85410 times)

Offline redbyrdz

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Re: Doping In Sport..
« Reply #1040 on: May 25, 2018, 12:01:53 PM »
I don't get why all top level clubs aren't randomly checked, so all players, at 3 or 4 random times during the season. Literally just an independent team turning up at their training base unannounced and taking samples from every single player. There is enough money in the game to do so. This would be on top of the random player tests that are currently done.

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Re: Doping In Sport..
« Reply #1041 on: May 28, 2018, 09:49:09 PM »
I don't get why all top level clubs aren't randomly checked, so all players, at 3 or 4 random times during the season. Literally just an independent team turning up at their training base unannounced and taking samples from every single player. There is enough money in the game to do so. This would be on top of the random player tests that are currently done.

They are
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Offline Chris~

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Offline just redk84 will do

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Re: Doping In Sport..
« Reply #1043 on: June 25, 2018, 01:43:22 PM »
One of the threads on here that I love to silently read, as I don't have much expertise to add.....but it is all very intriguing.

imo there simply HAS to be doping in football. Way too much at stake, the corruption of FIFA/UEFA and the money floating around all add up.

I dunno about any players/nations in particular but it will be a sad but inevitable day when things start coming out properly...
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Online Zeb

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Re: Doping In Sport..
« Reply #1044 on: October 1, 2019, 01:32:36 AM »
This one's moved slowly over the past few years.

Quote
Alberto Salazar - Mo Farah's former athletics coach - has been banned from the sport for four years after being found guilty of doping violations.

Salazar, 61, runs the Nike Oregon Project - home to four-time Olympic champion Farah from 2011 until 2017.

The decision follows a four-year investigation by the US Anti Doping Agency (Usada) and a two-year court battle behind closed doors.

The investigation began after a BBC Panorama programme in 2015.

The programme, a joint investigation with the US website ProPublica, revealed allegations of doping and unethical practices at the US training base in Beaverton, Oregon.

The UK sports governing body UK Athletics conducted its own review into the claims, and gave Briton Farah - also a six-time world champion - the green light to continue working with American Salazar.

Dr Geoffrey Brown, a Nike-paid endocrinologist who treated many of Salazar's athletes, has also been banned for four years.

The BBC can now reveal that doping charges against Salazar, who was born in Cuba, and Dr Brown were brought by Usada in March 2017. The pair contested the charges, supported by Nike-paid lawyers, and the case went to the American Arbitrators Association. It is expected Usada will make a statement shortly.

Farah announced he was leaving Salazar in October 2017 but denied his decision was to do with the doping claims.

And the old and curious case of lapsed memories and missed tests.

Quote
Firstly, Salazar and his Nike-Oregon Project are under investigation in the States, having initially been shown up in a Panorama documentary thanks to the whistle-blowing of former coach Steve Magness. Secondly, Aden was arrested in 2016 in Spain following a lengthy investigation and 24-hour surveillance resulting in a police raid that found EPO in six rooms of his and his team's hotel along with anabolic steroids and 60 syringes. Thirdly, when later asked if he knew Aden, Farah denied it. And fourthly this was during a period where he missed two doping tests - the second of which saw testers ring his doorbell for an hour only for him to fail to answer and his excuse was that he slept through it all.

This is all a matter of record and, rather than a means of accusing Farah, it has left him with repeated chances to answer and explain what happened. Tick tock. Tick tock.

It was also during this period – in 2012 - that Farah and Paula Radcliffe were reported to be training together in the remote Kenyan village of Iten in the Rift Valley. It was from here that she came back with a biological passport off-score that nearly got her banned. He, however, did the 5,000m and 10,000m double at his home Olympics. Although never a zero, how many predicted this hero?

That marked the beginning of Farah becoming unbeatable at championships. But think about about the various elements. As an example, in 2013 he broke the European 1,500m record which started drawing unwanted glares. That's because Farah hadn't shown the capacity to be really good at that distance, never mind better than all the greats like Coe, Cram, Ovett and others. If that, along with Aden and Salazar, raised unanswered questions though, so did what followed.

(from 2018, Irish Independent's Ewan MacKenna.)
« Last Edit: October 1, 2019, 01:39:44 AM by Zeb »
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Offline BER

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Re: Doping In Sport..
« Reply #1045 on: October 2, 2019, 10:51:48 AM »
Has Sir Mo said anything yet? Should probably check notes with Paula Radcliffe before he does.

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Re: Doping In Sport..
« Reply #1046 on: October 5, 2019, 01:02:14 PM »
Has Sir Mo said anything yet? Should probably check notes with Paula Radcliffe before he does.

Thought this was brilliant by Barney Ronay:

Quote
Sebastian Coe’s stance on Salazar displays a very British hypocrisy

Barney Ronay

The response of the IAAF president and the athletics commentariat to the doping ban of Alberto Salazar, Mo Farah’s former coach, is little short of nauseating

Say what you like about British hypocrisy. It’s still the best hypocrisy in the world. This is a robust hypocrisy, sustained by centuries-old structures and conventions. British hypocrisy speaks confidently. It wears a well-cut suit. It peers down the rims of its half-moon glasses as it gives you a cold, deathly half-handshake and looks towards the door. Above all British hypocrisy doesn’t have to explain itself – and let’s be absolutely clear on this point – to the likes of you.

At which point, enter Sebastian Coe, Alberto Salazar, Mo Farah and the nauseating obfuscation of the BBC-platformed British athletics commentariat. Mainly, though, enter Coe, who as president of the IAAF operates under an unconditional duty of care to protect the reputation, legacy and probity of his sport.

It was presumably in this capacity Coe suggested this week that athletes who had won medals under the coaching of Salazar at the Nike-sponsored training campus in Oregon should “not be tarnished” by the fact Salazar himself has now been banned from the sport for a string of doping violations at the Nike-sponsored training campus in Oregon. These athletes should not be tarnished because none of them have actually failed a drugs test.

It is the kind of statement you find yourself staring at, trying to find its edges. It is easy to see why Coe might be confused. We have a murder, but no body. A doping has happened. And yet no athlete has been doped. The obvious conclusion is that Salazar must be a very inaccurate doper.

There are of course cynics out there who will suggest there is something odd about a then-Nike-employed IAAF president (38 years, resigned in 2015) offering his disinterested thoughts on the doping violations of a Nike-funded coach at a Nike-run campus. That what Coe is really saying is that the achievements and future prospects of Sebastian Coe should not be “tarnished” by a scandal that is, you suspect, only now kicking into gear.

But it can’t be just that. British hypocrisy is a powerful, resilient substance. But it’s not that good.

Or is it? Consider Neil Black, UK Athletics’ performance director, who announced in August 2017 that he had confronted Salazar like a man stalking a cougar in the wild, had looked him in the eye and from that one look knew instantly there was nothing awry and that Salazar would definitely not end up being banned for doping violations. Black will clearly have to resign. If only out of embarrassment.

Or will he? Consider for a moment the celebrity cheerleaders of the BBC punditry studios. “Everybody knew that there was cheating going on and people getting away with it. It was seriously affecting the credibility of the sport.” The uncompromising words, there, of Paula Radcliffe. But not this week. That was Paula Radcliffe, zero-tolerance author of Paula: My Story So Far, in a chapter called “Taking on the cheats”.

That version of Radcliffe, a kind of anti-doping Che Guevara, has apparently been decommissioned. It has been replaced by the version that appeared this week on the BBC to offer up an interview of vomit-inducing faux piety during which she saw, in Salazar, a coach who was guilty of no more than “overstepping the line”, of wanting to win – sigh – too much, whose doping violations were, you know, kind of OK.

“Have real anti-doping rules been transgressed by athletes? I don’t think so. Otherwise we would have seen athletes banned at this point,” Radcliffe announced, the same Radcliffe who wrote in her own book that “Everybody knows the tests are not guaranteed to expose the cheats.” Which one is it! This is confusing!

Instead Radcliffe, fearless crusader for the truth, suggested it had been a waste of money to expose the doping violations of the sport’s most high-profile coach. A bit later she pulled an improvised foil helmet out of her holdall and implied the entire investigation was designed to distract from the recent Christian Coleman case, despite predating it by four years, a suggestion so asinine it is probably an affront to the word “asinine” to align the two.

The one thing Radcliffe didn’t offer up during this stream of thought-blurts was the fact that she is herself an ambassador for Nike. Similarly Steve Cram, so eloquent in his condemnation of Justin Gatlin, so resolute on the mass-banning of Russian athletes, was silent on his own ties to Nike, all the while insisting this week that there should be no guilt by association for those associated with a guilty coach.

And like it or not all of this leaves some uncomfortable questions. Questions about just how involved Salazar has been with UK Athletics in the last nine years. Or how exhaustive the UK Athletics investigation into the Nike Oregon project actually was (UK Athletics, naturally, has a long-term sponsorship deal with Nike).

Plus of course, questions about Farah. Let’s face it, there are plenty of people out there who want Farah to fall, for the hundreds of clean drug tests to count for nothing. It is a frightening prospect. Farah has been a brilliant champion. He remains the face of British Athletics, and of Coe’s own greatest triumph.

And yet, it is only human to feel wary, to want to know a little more about the star UK athlete at a programme that has now been entirely discredited.

Just as it is bizarre to insist, as Coe does, that there really is nothing to see, that nobody should be tarnished by any of this. British hypocrisy can take you a long way. But good luck with that one.

Offline Ziltoid

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Re: Doping In Sport..
« Reply #1047 on: October 5, 2019, 09:59:06 PM »
Fantastic article that.
He's got a tattoo on his wrist that says "I hate blackie blackie blackie blacks, and I fucking love handballing it into the opponent's goal and away from my own goal, and biting people, and kicking young kids in the bollocks when they ask for autographs. And diving. I fucking love that."

Offline Zee_26

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Re: Doping In Sport..
« Reply #1048 on: October 6, 2019, 10:42:55 AM »
Great article. There is no doubt that the IAAF is compromised as the fallout from banning or retro disqualifying athletes who are basically the faces of the sport would just destroy athletics in its entirety. It would be so much worse than the Tour de France after Armstrong got pinged. They, with the help of big sponsors, have painted themselves into a corner that they cannot come out of.

I've always been wary of Farah as it just didn't sit right that someone could rise up to be an all-timer in distance running at the age of 28-29, having done nothing of consequence up to that point not even a junior title of importance. There's plenty of smoke at this point and the fire could be big enough to do massive damage all across the sport.

As for Radcliffe, her hypocrisy is just blatant at this point. This coming from someone who tore up marathons year in and year out, but was always off colour during important track meets when doping tests were more strictly observed. Not suspicious in the slightest!

Offline SamAteTheRedAcid

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Re: Doping In Sport..
« Reply #1049 on: October 6, 2019, 10:54:10 AM »
I've always been wary of Farah as it just didn't sit right that someone could rise up to be an all-timer in distance running at the age of 28-29, having done nothing of consequence up to that point not even a junior title of importance. There's plenty of smoke at this point and the fire could be big enough to do massive damage all across the sport.

As for Radcliffe, her hypocrisy is just blatant at this point. This coming from someone who tore up marathons year in and year out, but was always off colour during important track meets when doping tests were more strictly observed. Not suspicious in the slightest!

Both of these also describe a certain cyclist who keeps falling off his bike...for marathons read Grand Tours...
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Online Ray K

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Re: Doping In Sport..
« Reply #1050 on: Yesterday at 04:39:24 PM »
Magnificent performances all round in the British Cycling/Dr Freeman tribunal. I'm certainly convinced that everything was above board and they all weren't doped to the gills like East German swimmers in the 1970s.

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Offline Ziltoid

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Re: Doping In Sport..
« Reply #1051 on: Yesterday at 06:04:49 PM »
Of course it was! 🤔😉
He's got a tattoo on his wrist that says "I hate blackie blackie blackie blacks, and I fucking love handballing it into the opponent's goal and away from my own goal, and biting people, and kicking young kids in the bollocks when they ask for autographs. And diving. I fucking love that."