Author Topic: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.  (Read 35589 times)

Offline Red Berry

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The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« on: December 27, 2015, 01:25:53 PM »
In my trundles around the Internet I've amassed quite a collection of positive and motivational images that I enjoy sharing on the likes of Facebook and Elefriends.  It's only just occurred to me that they could also benefit some of the lovely people here on RAWK.

Of course the thread is an open invitation for people to share what lifts them.  Funny images; inspiring quotes; strategies for keeping the Black Dog at bay.

The images and comments are meant to inspire and comfort - not provoke debate.  If something does not resonate with you or match your belief system then that is quite fine.  But let's avoid cluttering the thread up with comments along the lines of, "I don't agree with that" or "that doesn't work for me" or "that's way too simplistic".

I hope it helps. :)



« Last Edit: December 27, 2015, 04:12:46 PM by Red Beret »
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

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Offline smithy

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2015, 03:37:00 PM »
Made me smile after a tricky few days. Good idea. Cheers.

Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2015, 04:08:51 PM »
You're welcome mate.  I'll be adding daily.  :)

Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

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Online BlackandWhitePaul

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2015, 05:08:48 PM »
Next time Liverpool lose a game you want to go in the post match thread and direct some of the doom and gloom merchants to this thread.     ;)
Ashley, Ashley
When will those debt clouds disappear
Ashley, Ashley
When will you jump in the Tyne-and-Wear
With no salad in your bowl
And no money in your coats
You can say we're dissatisfied
Ashley, Ashley
 ©   PhaseOfPlay

Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2015, 05:40:08 PM »
Next time Liverpool lose a game you want to go in the post match thread and direct some of the doom and gloom merchants to this thread.     ;)

meh, just make them watch this.  8)

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/QUQsqBqxoR4" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/QUQsqBqxoR4</a>
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2015, 09:40:52 AM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

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Offline AnfieldCat

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2015, 08:33:27 PM »
As a huge anxiety sufferer seeing this one resonated with me and I try to remember it:

Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2015, 11:18:31 AM »
As a huge anxiety sufferer seeing this one resonated with me and I try to remember it:


Yeah.  I have several similar such captions relating to this.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2015, 11:22:59 AM »
I read these again and thought of RuncornRed.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

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Offline L666KOP

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #9 on: December 29, 2015, 12:12:58 PM »
Brilliant thread.

Cheers RB.
 :)
13mins - Bournemouth have gone home. Utd kicked off anyway. Still 0-0 as Smalling passes it back to De Gea.

Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2015, 12:20:06 PM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

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Offline Wigwamdelbert

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2015, 01:09:03 PM »
oops
Every man has a dream

Some just can't be spoken of in polite company

Offline Billy The Kid

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2015, 02:55:49 PM »
The poor man is not the man with the empty bank account. The poor man is the man without a dream
“When overtaken by defeat, as you may be many times, remember than mans faith in his own ability is tested many times before he is crowned with final victory. Defeats are nothing more than challenges to keep trying.” – Napoleon Hill.

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2015, 02:57:48 PM »
The poor man is not the man with the empty bank account. The poor man is the man without a dream

Some people are so poor all they have is money.

Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2015, 08:18:25 PM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

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Offline gazzalfc

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #15 on: December 29, 2015, 08:35:39 PM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/dg3PberzvXo" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/dg3PberzvXo</a>

Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2015, 09:38:27 AM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #17 on: December 31, 2015, 08:57:38 AM »
Happy New Year all.  8)
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #18 on: January 1, 2016, 10:28:22 AM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

PROJECT WAKE UP UK

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Offline rob1966

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #19 on: January 1, 2016, 11:38:15 AM »





Online Gerry Attrick

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #20 on: January 1, 2016, 11:40:25 AM »
Brilliant thread this

Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #21 on: January 1, 2016, 01:41:39 PM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

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Offline soxfan

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #22 on: January 1, 2016, 04:20:12 PM »
Great thread topic Red Beret. :) We all could use some positivity in our lives. We are bombarded with negativity by the media every day nonstop. I'll definitely contribute. If we can make a New Year's resolution, let's keep this thread alive all year. Let's not skip a week without updates. If a handful of us get behind it, we can do it. I'll pop some stuff in here over the weekend.


Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #23 on: January 1, 2016, 07:10:42 PM »
Great thread topic Red Beret. :) We all could use some positivity in our lives. We are bombarded with negativity by the media every day nonstop. I'll definitely contribute. If we can make a New Year's resolution, let's keep this thread alive all year. Let's not skip a week without updates. If a handful of us get behind it, we can do it. I'll pop some stuff in here over the weekend.

Cheers mate.  :)  I'm finding stuff every day so I'll posting in here at least once per day until I run out of images.  Then I'll probably repeat a few to keep people reminded.  You have to constantly bombard yourself with positive vibes every day to get out of a slump so there's no reason not to keep going back to the very beginning of this thread every once in awhile.  8)
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #24 on: January 2, 2016, 10:32:40 AM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

PROJECT WAKE UP UK

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #25 on: January 2, 2016, 08:15:52 PM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

PROJECT WAKE UP UK

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #26 on: January 3, 2016, 10:28:14 AM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

PROJECT WAKE UP UK

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #27 on: January 4, 2016, 10:52:51 AM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

PROJECT WAKE UP UK

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #28 on: January 5, 2016, 05:48:31 PM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

PROJECT WAKE UP UK

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Offline liversaint

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #29 on: January 5, 2016, 07:47:49 PM »
Next time Liverpool lose a game you want to go in the post match thread and direct some of the doom and gloom merchants to this thread.     ;)

Or the pre match thread
You say Honey? I say Fuck off.

You dont win friends with Salad

There is another option. Mr Ferguson organises the fixtures in his office and sends it to us and everyone will know and cannot complain. That is simple.

Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #30 on: January 6, 2016, 12:44:51 PM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

PROJECT WAKE UP UK

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #31 on: January 6, 2016, 08:43:12 PM »
9 Ways To Stop Overthinking

There is a fine line between thinking something through and overthinking. The problem is that not many people manage to control their thoughts efficiently and easily fall into the trap of overthinking. This kind of behavior can do more harm than you might think because it does not only prevent you from enjoying the present moment, but also deprives you from making an adequate decision that is not dictated by fear or misjudgement. Here is a list of ideas on how to escape that mind-trap.

Decision making deadlines

Giving yourself a set amount of time for decision making is a great way to avoid overthinking. Usually, when we are trying to decide what to do, whether or not to do something, we let our minds wonder and explore all the possible outcomes of the potential choices. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing but often the decision making process can keep on going for an excessive amount of time. Not only does this prevent us from taking action, but it also is a sure way to waste our precious time. So, next time when you catch yourself struggling with making a decision, give yourself a time-limit. For example, when it comes to a small decision, give it 1 minute to decide and when it comes to a big one- till the end of the day. This strategy is definitely worth trying because it’s simple and saves you some time and headaches.

Time-out

Giving yourself a break when you feel like you are not thinking straight helps a lot. We all have our moments of uncertainty and instability. In such times forcing yourself to think of a solution to a problem or making a decision can be really overwhelming. Taking a break from the negative thoughts by going for a walk or taking a nap can improve your thinking process significantly. You will feel refreshed and will be able to resolve the issue you were struggling with easier and more sufficiently.

Fight procrastination

Too many people nowadays are struggling with procrastination. Maybe this is because in the age we live in there are so many potential distractions that our minds get easily attracted to and fall into the trap of constantly delaying the work that should be done. But procrastinating can also serve you as an excuse to overthink different scenarios and situations and that can drain your energy really fast. This issue is not an easy one to resolve because it requires a strong mindset and tons of determination. But if you manage to actually become a person of action and fight the unresourceful habit of procrastination, you will not only have rarer occasions to overthink but it will also improve your life in many other aspects. So, train your mind into resisting the temptations that are distracting you and become a newer, stronger and more active YOU!

Working out


What does a great job at fighting overthinking is working out. Practicing a sport or simply going to the gym can not only boost your health but it can also help you organize your thoughts. Working out regularly can help you arrange your time more efficiently and can strengthen your will and determination. You will feel more productive and won’t waste time thinking insignificant thoughts.

Will this matter a week/month/year from now?

Asking yourself this question can help you realize the level of importance of the issue you are struggling with. If it is not going to matter even a month from now, why do you worry so much about it? Training yourself to use that method in order to get a wider and more adequate view of your situation, will make it easier for you to let go of the useless stories that you are obsessing with.

Be aware in the present moment


Being content in the now can help you stop overthinking because you will be focused on what you are doing and feeling right now. People usually think through things that have either already happened or things that can happen in the future. This is why practicing present awareness is so beneficial. What is more valuable than the present moment after all?

Being a control freak can only hold you back


Aiming to control everything that you can in your life isn’t going to take you far. On the contrary, it is more possible to hold you back. Thinking through something 60 times is a form of control obsession. When you catch yourself doing it, remind yourself that life is meant to be lived, not controlled or planned to the last detail. The sooner you realize that, the happier you will feel because even if you make a wrong choice or fail while trying to achieve a goal, you can always learn something new. And of course, next time you can try again more confidently and smarter. All the people that you look up to have failed at some point of their lives before they have achieved their dreams. And maybe thanks to these failures, they have succeeded.

Don’t think of what can go wrong, but what can go right

In many cases overthinking is caused by one emotion- fear. Falling into its mind-trap can cause big headaches and excessive worries. The sad truth is that fear controls many people’s lives. They are used to overthink the negative things that MIGHT happen to them, the ways that they can fail at life. This has unfortunately become an unresourceful thinking pattern that deprives people from unleashing their true potential and daring to dream big. If you recognize yourself in these lines, don’t worry. You have the power to overcome your fears and to do great things with your life. Next time you sense that you are falling into the trap of your fear and start getting obsessed with negative thoughts, tell yourself “STOP!” and think of what can go right, what you CAN achieve. Visualize your dreams and make them your motivation.

Be careful what you brainwash yourself with

We don’t always realize this but what we read, listen to, watch and who we hang out with have a great impact on our way of thinking. Be cautious with how you decide to spend your time. Choose books and blogs that help you be the version of yourself you have always dreamed of being. Overthinking can often be caused by things that influence us from the “outside” world. Hanging out with people who encourage you to grow and support you can really help with overcoming the habit of overthinking.

http://iheartintelligence.com/2014/12/01/stop-overthinking/?c=hp
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

PROJECT WAKE UP UK

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #32 on: January 7, 2016, 05:41:32 PM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

PROJECT WAKE UP UK

Popcorn's Art

Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #33 on: January 7, 2016, 08:05:53 PM »
23 Things People With Borderline Personality Disorder Want You To Know

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a mental illness affecting approximately 1.6% of adults in the U.S. Symptoms — usually beginning in adolescence and early adulthood — include emotional instability, extreme reactions, distorted sense of self, chronic feelings of emptiness, self-harm, and suicidal thoughts or attempts. Research on BPD is in fairly early stages, so many people either don’t know it exists or don’t know what it means. BuzzFeed reached out to six people with BPD — men and women, ages 19-36 — to find out what it’s really like.

1. BPD can make it incredibly difficult to regulate your emotions.

“I am extremely sensitive to emotional stimuli — emotional hypersensitivity is the core of my experience of BPD. Because of this, the speed at which my emotions fluctuate is breathtaking, and they tend to be extremes of emotion, such as elation or utter despair. I have to work hard at managing and regulating my emotions. This is very difficult, and sometimes I get overwhelmed.” —Andrea Shaw

2. One way people with BPD cope is by dissociating from their surroundings, which means psychologically or emotionally detaching themselves from what’s happening to or around them. But this can often be misinterpreted.

“Think of someone who is highly sensitive living in a cruel world. Not only does the cruel world not value sensitivity, but it inflicts trauma. That person experiencing pain will respond in genius ways such as dissociative coping, only to have others interpret this protective response as angry and manipulative. If our community valued sensitivity, and understood our responses to pain, we could enjoy life; we’d want to be present for it.” —Mary Hofert Flaherty

3. Dissociation or depersonalization can be incredibly scary.

“Depersonalization is basically a defense mechanism, usually after some kind of trauma, but when you get chronic depersonalization — like I did — you get caught in that state for months. And that’s what happened. I wasn’t depressed. The best way to describe it would be like this: When you’re really high on marijuana, and your hands don’t feel like they’re yours, or you’ll say something and you’re like, Did I just say that? That type of thing. It was very frightening, and doctors kept saying it was depression.” —Royal Cumings

4. BPD doesn’t make people inherently mean or angry.

“Most people with BPD that I’ve met are very gentle souls; they’re very kind people. It’s a sensitive brain combined with either trauma or invalidation. A lot of people have the impression that BPD folks are just assholes, just because the people who lash out are the loudest. The quiet ones are either misdiagnosed, or they’re just quiet. And there’s millions of us. Most us are very decent, sensitive people, and we don’t like hurting people. There’s this notion that we’re all angry.” —RC

5. People with BPD can’t just choose to be a different way.

“People who suffer with BPD do not choose to be this way. Through lots of research and soul searching I have come to the conclusion that my BPD was caused by a combination of two factors: a genetic predisposition and growing up in an invalidating environment.” —Shelley Fisher

6. And they’re not doing this for attention.

“I have encountered a large amount of stigma throughout my illness, mainly from people who assume that I have chosen to behave in a certain way for attention (normally surrounding self-harming or suicidal behaviors). I would like to make it clear that choosing to harm myself was a very traumatic experience.” —SF

7. People with BPD can go through years of misdiagnoses — and it’s incredibly disheartening.

“I was diagnosed bipolar a couple times, major depression, general mood disorders, but nothing felt right. When one doctor finally said it sounded like BPD, and the more I learned about it, the more I read about it, I was like — this is me. Finally I’m home; I have a diagnosis. We know what’s wrong and we know what to do now. ” —RC

8. So when they finally get the right diagnosis, it can be a huge relief.

“It felt really good to know I wasn’t alone in struggling with it. Once I found out it was something a lot of people struggle with, I felt better, because I suddenly felt like it wasn’t just me, that I wasn’t just the crazy one.” —Erika Hanson

9. Once that diagnosis comes, it can still be an exhausting process trying to find help for it.

“It’s been a lot of handing off. The first time I got help, the adviser in my high school — in my boarding school — noticed I had cuts and forced me to go to the counseling center, but even there they didn’t really know how to help me. Eventually they told me to go home to find a new therapist. I can’t even tell you how many therapists I’ve gone to just because they’re like, ‘We don’t know how to work with you; try this therapist!’” —EH

10. But just one supportive health professional can make a world of difference.

“I eventually developed a life-changing relationship with a psychologist — the first and only mental health professional who competently and compassionately responded to my presentation of BPD. It was this relationship that facilitated my full acceptance of and burgeoning insight into the basic concept of BPD, and its role in my life.” — MHF

11. A lot of times, people living with BPD are also living with other disorders — often substance abuse, depression, anxiety, and eating disorders.

“Borderline is really related to my eating disorder and they’re treated concurrently. Restricting and purging have been ways for me to manage these strong emotions that I face, and that I have difficulty regulating. I feel like I can’t be happy and I can’t be sad, and I just want to be numb, and the behaviors I’ve used to do that have definitely not been healthy.” —EH

12. BPD can make it really hard to maintain relationships.

“BPD has an enormous impact on my personal relationships. Because I am so emotionally sensitive, I can often overreact to things that friends or family do or say and might then behave in a way that is unhelpful to both me and the other person. This makes maintaining friendships very difficult.” —Andrea Shaw, email

“The very essence of BPD is that it has a direct impact on your ability to communicate, and maintain relationships with the people closest to you. You pull people in close in an intense relationship, and then with no warning push them away as hard as possible. This cycle repeats over and over again because, until you get treatment, you lack the skills to maintain relationships at a functional level. On top of that, BPD causes a large fear of abandonment — think, ‘I hate you, don’t leave me!’” —SF

13. But it may even make your emotional ties stronger.

“I’ve had the privilege of spending most of the past decade in long-term, committed relationships with people — people whom I’ve loved fiercely, and who have loved me back just as fiercely. BPD provides for a more intense, emotional experience, which, in terms of my romantic relationships, has been more of a gift than a curse.” — MHF

14. Trust is hugely important.

“Something that helps is my rock-solid relationship with my husband. He is extremely supportive — I trust him 100% so I don’t experience the same relationship problems with him that I do with others.” —Andrea Shaw, email

“In my case, BPD stems from childhood trauma — the abuse and neglect I suffered from my father. I was left feeling worthless and unlovable, with major trust issues. I live in constant fear of being rejected by the people I love, and make frantic efforts to prevent it.” —Marra Yates

15. So is validation.

“For many years, ever since I was around 12, my parents thought that I was just trying to get attention using my behaviors — self-harm, crying spells, depressive symptoms. They didn’t believe I had a problem, so for a long time they didn’t support my treatment and didn’t want to pay for my treatment. It was really hard; I felt really invalidated for a long time.” —EH

16. And patience.

“I am lucky to be in a relationship with someone patient, who will understand when I ‘overreact’ to things like taking too long to text me back. To me, canceling a dinner date may as well be breaking up. And seeing my best friend spend time with her coworker makes me believe that I am alone and unloved. I can’t help feeling this way, but I do my best to not let BPD keep me from living a normal life and forming healthy relationships.” —MY

17. Some forms of therapy work better than others — it depends on the patient, and the practitioner.

“Cognitive behavioral therapy doesn’t go far enough for me. I’m not dissing it — I think for certain people it works great. In DBT [Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, a specific kind of therapy developed for people with BPD], the skills are aimed at exactly what we deal with. The core of it is mindfulness. It’s also much more intensive than other therapies. It’s at least a year, and you go twice a week, once in a group or class, and also one-on-one with a therapist. And your therapist is your coach, almost like a sponsor in AA. If you start dysregulating and you’re about to freak out or do something stupid — whether it be cutting yourself or drinking or lashing out — you call them and they talk you down. They don’t engage with anger, or ignore you, which other people do and only makes things worse. It’s basically a rewiring of the brain — and if you practice, practice, practice every day, you’ll get good at it. It changes your behavior, and your thinking. It just works for me.” —RC

18. But there’s often a waiting list for DBT, which can make getting treatment difficult.

“Treatment for BPD in the UK is very patchy and non-existent in many localities. The mainstay of treatment is DBT or a couple of other specialised psychotherapies, and in many areas it just isn’t available, or is extremely heavily rationed so that only a tiny proportion of those diagnosed with BPD get access to it. I personally have not had any BPD-specific treatment since being officially diagnosed almost five years ago.” —Andrea Shaw, email

“The only really well-known treatment for it is DBT — which, even if you live in a town that offers it, you have to go on a waiting list. Some of it is because they don’t have the room, but a lot of it is insurance stuff. For a while I was able to do it, traveling three hours up to Cincinnati, paying out of pocket, and it really helped. But I had to stop for personal reasons, go on disability. I’m back on a waiting list — also waiting for my Medicaid — but I’ll at least be eligible again in March. It feels like I’m treading water. I just want to be my old, normal self again.” —RC

19. This can make it feel like people with BPD have to fend for themselves.

“When I was diagnosed with BPD and I researched it, I realized that I really needed to get myself some DBT. Sadly the waiting list in my area for this therapy was more than two years, so I decided to buy some books written by Marsha Linehan (the creator of DBT) which were aimed at therapists — and teach myself the therapy.” —SF

20. Sometimes the most important factor in recovery is love, support, and reassurance.

“People with BPD want and need to be loved, but their behavior can push and drive the people closest to them away. They end up alone, scared and consequently cannot see the point in continuing. What they need is the support and empathy to get the help they need, and hopefully more sufferers can follow the path I eventually did — to recovery.” —SF

21. If we don’t talk about BPD — and break the stigma — it might keep people from getting help.

“Stigma is the reason, more so than the actual impediments of symptoms, that I’ve struggled in my career; and it’s the reason BPD research, treatment development, peer support, and community resources are so underfunded.” —MHF

22. Visibility matters.

“I really do want to recover, and I’m taking all the steps I can to work toward recovery, and I’ve seen it happen in other people. It gives me hope that maybe it could happen for me.” —EH

23. People with BPD are stronger than you know.

“My extreme emotional reactions are so ingrained in my brain that I can’t prevent myself from experiencing them, and instead I have to manage them. Living with BPD is incredibly hard work and anyone who manages to stay alive in the face of such intense pain is a hero in my book.” —AS

http://www.buzzfeed.com/ariannarebolini/things-people-with-bpd-want-you?bffbhealth&utm_term=.wqoajdnB5d#.taglLYPk7Y
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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #34 on: January 8, 2016, 03:45:19 PM »
.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

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Offline alonsoisared

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #35 on: January 8, 2016, 04:18:07 PM »
.
"confidence is about knowing, and loving yourself enough to not compare yourself to others...but here's a picture of a blonde with a cracking arse all you ladies would love to look like"

Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #36 on: January 8, 2016, 09:32:28 PM »
"confidence is about knowing, and loving yourself enough to not compare yourself to others...but here's a picture of a blonde with a cracking arse all you ladies would love to look like"

You have a problem with the image or did you just feel the urge to make a tongue in cheek comment?
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

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Offline Red Berry

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #37 on: January 8, 2016, 09:32:49 PM »
.
« Last Edit: January 8, 2016, 09:34:24 PM by Red Beret »
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

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Offline Red Berry

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Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

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Offline Broad Spectrum

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Re: The RAWK Positivity and otherwise Uplifting thread.
« Reply #39 on: January 8, 2016, 11:25:28 PM »
Great thread.