Author Topic: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick  (Read 2711843 times)

Online Ray K

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58120 on: October 6, 2019, 01:32:33 PM »
Love his latest defence:
'It was a perfect call, the most perfect phone call ever, people were crying over how perfect it was.
Rick Perry made me do it. It was all his idea'.
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Offline rodderzzz

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58121 on: October 6, 2019, 02:43:55 PM »
Second whistleblower now come forward who was present for the call. Surely this is it now

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58122 on: October 6, 2019, 02:45:30 PM »
Second whistleblower now come forward who was present for the call. Surely this is it now
Trump has admitted it. The whistleblowers are almost irrelevant
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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58123 on: October 6, 2019, 02:47:39 PM »
2nd whistleblower comes forward after speaking with IG: Attorney

Quote
Mark Zaid, the attorney representing the whistleblower who sounded the alarm on President Donald Trump's dealings with Ukraine and triggered an impeachment inquiry, tells ABC News that he is now representing a second whistleblower who has spoken with the inspector general.

Zaid tells ABC News' Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos that the second person -- also described as an intelligence official -- has first-hand knowledge of some of the allegations outlined in the original complaint and has been interviewed by the head of the intelligence community's internal watchdog office, Michael Atkinson.

The existence of a second whistleblower -- particularly one who can speak directly about events involving the president related to conversations involving Ukraine -- could undercut Trump's repeated insistence that the original complaint, released on Sept. 26, was "totally inaccurate."

That original seven-page complaint alleged that Trump pushed a foreign power to investigate his political rival, Joe Biden, and Biden's son, Hunter, and that unnamed senior White House officials then tried to "lock down" all records of the phone call.

"This set of actions underscored to me that White House officials understood the gravity of what had transpired in the call," the first whistleblower stated, in a complaint filed Aug. 12.

Zaid says both officials have full protection of the law intended to protect whistleblowers from being fired in retaliation. While this second official has spoken with the IG -- the internal watchdog office created to handle complaints -- this person has not communicated yet with the congressional committees conducting the investigation.

The New York Times on Friday cited anonymous sources in reporting that a second intelligence official was weighing whether to file his own former complaint and testify to Congress. Zaid says he does not know if the second whistleblower he represents is the person identified in the Times report.

According to the first whistleblower, more than a half a dozen U.S. officials have information relevant to the investigation -- suggesting the probe could widen even further.

Quote
The White House had no comment.

https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/2nd-whistleblower-forward-speaking-ig-attorney/story?id=66092396

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58124 on: October 6, 2019, 03:40:06 PM »
Yep, they explained on Mueller She Wrote podcast that there's something like a 3 year period in which some of his wrong-doings can be considered. I suspect he'll have multiple investigations against him when he leaves the WH. Hopefully his entire family are dragged in to the inauguration investigation.

Wait, there’s a podcast called ‘mueller she wrote’?

Genius.

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58125 on: October 6, 2019, 03:53:36 PM »
Trump has admitted it. The whistleblowers are almost irrelevant

They're not.  There's a big difference between admitting and corroborating details.

Trump admits in a dismissive manner, as if to say everyone does it and if you don't you're stupid.  I'll be really interested in learning the context of "first hand" in this instance - that would suggest this person listened in on the call. 

Makes it very difficult for Trump to try and take the sting out of this now.  He can't admit to it twice, and the devil will truly be in the details.

Like I said, I fully expect that the GOP are already planning their exit strategy.  They'll cut Trump loose very quickly when the time comes.
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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58126 on: October 6, 2019, 07:44:34 PM »
Rolling Stone
Trump Blames Rick Perry for ‘Perfect’ Ukraine Call
 Peter Wade
16 hrs ago


It now appears as though the “perfect” call President Donald Trump made to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky needs a fall guy, and outgoing Energy Secretary Rick Perry may just be that man.

According to a report on Saturday, a source told Axios that the president told House Republicans during a conference call on Friday: “Not a lot of people know this but, I didn’t even want to make the call. The only reason I made the call was because Rick asked me to. Something about an LNG [liquified natural gas] plant.” Axios also reported that the president’s quote was confirmed by two other sources.

Earlier this week, Politico reported that Perry is expected to announce his resignation from the administration by the end of November.

Trump has been trying to sell that the call was not intended to put any pressure on Zelensky to investigate the president’s political foes, but was instead “perfect.” The news of the call along with the withholding of congressional approved funds by Trump moved Speaker Nancy Pelosi to accelerate the already-in-motion impeachment inquiry, and it now appears now that Trump might be looking for an out or a scapegoat.

Axios went on to report that this might not be the end of Trump’s blame Perry strategy, with one source telling them, “more of this will be coming out in the next few days.”

Congressional Democrats are already interested in a trip Perry made to the Ukraine in May when he attended Zelensky’s inauguration in place of Vice President Mike Pence. Further, according to Axios, the House’s subpoena of Rudy Giuliani includes documents related to Perry and Ukrainian leaders.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/trump-blames-rick-perry-for-perfect-ukraine-call/ar-AAIlhHy
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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58127 on: October 6, 2019, 07:47:32 PM »
FOX News
Rick Perry denies discussing Bidens with Trump or Ukraine officials: reports
 Dom Calicchio
8 hrs ago


Energy Secretary Rick Perry denies ever mentioning the Bidens during discussions with Ukrainian officials or with President Trump, according to reports.

Perry’s name has come up in connection with the Trump-Ukraine phone call saga, after news outlet Axios reported that Trump told House Republicans he made the July phone call to the Ukrainian president based on Perry’s recommendation.

The controversy surrounding the call centers on allegations that Trump requested Ukraine officials investigate business dealings in the country by former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden, as part of a “quid pro quo” arrangement for Ukraine to secure U.S military funding.

Democrats have alleged that such an arrangement could be grounds for Trump’s impeachment. But some Republicans say Capitol Hill testimony last week by former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Kurt Volker nullied any "quid pro quo" claim.

Although neither Biden has been charged with wrongdoing, Trump has raised questions about Hunter Biden’s appointment to the board of Burisma Holdings, a Ukrainian energy firm, and Joe Biden’s later efforts, while vice president, to oust a Ukrainian prosecutor who was investigating the company’s founder.

In its story, Axios cited three sources who claim Trump pointed to Perry as having suggested the president call his Ukrainian counterpart.

According to one source, Trump said words to the effect of: "Not a lot of people know this but, I didn't even want to make the call. The only reason I made the call was because Rick asked me to. Something about an LNG [liquified natural gas] plant," and the other two sources agreed with that recollection, Axios reported.

But on Friday, Perry -- the Republican former governor of Texas who has served as energy secretary since March 2017 -- told the Christian Broadcasting Network in an exclusive interview that his dealings in Ukraine were part of a U.S. effort to help clean up corruption there, but the Bidens’ names never came up during his discussions with Trump administration officials.

“I never heard, and I talked to the president about this,” Perry told the Christian network. “I had a conversation with - a phone call - with [Trump attorney] Rudy Guiliani about it. I've talked to the previous [U.S.] ambassador [to Ukraine]. I've talked to the current ambassador.

“I’ve talked to Kurt Volker, Gordan Sondland, the EU ambassador, every name that you've seen out in the media, and not once, not once as God is my witness, not once was a Biden name -- not the former vice president, not his son -- ever mentioned.

“Corruption was talked about in the country but it was always a relatively vague term of, you know, the oligarchs and this and that and what have you.”

In addition, Politico reported Saturday that its sources claim Perry never discussed a possible investigation of the Bidens with any Ukrainian officials. The same report disclosed that Perry’s dealing in Ukraine have been more extensive than had been publicly reported – including efforts to convince Ukraine’s state-owned natural gas company Naftogaz to add Americans to its board.

The ultimate goal of Perry’s efforts in Ukraine, the secretary told the Christian network, was to help eliminate corruption in the country so that U.S. companies could have confidence doing business there.

"This has been a very intense, a very focused push to get Ukraine to clean up the corruption,” Perry told the Christian network. “It's a very well-known fact that this was historically a corrupt place and the message was clear: You clean up the corruption and the United States will be certainly willing to come in and help you.

"I can't go in good faith and tell a U.S. company, ‘Go and invest here, go and be involved,’ if the corruption is ongoing," he added.

Last week Politico reported that Perry is expected to resign from the Energy Department in November, citing information from three sources, but the Energy Department responded with a statement downplaying the story.

“While the beltway media has breathlessly reported on rumors of Secretary Perry's departure for months, he is still the Secretary of Energy and a proud member of President Trump’s Cabinet,” department spokeswoman Shaylyn Haynes wrote. “One day the media will be right. Today is not that day.”

The Politico story said Perry’s possible departure was not related to the Ukraine situation.

Meanwhile, the Axios story said Trump suggested that more information about Perry's role in the Ukraine situation "will be coming out in the next few days."

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/rick-perry-denies-discussing-bidens-with-trump-or-ukraine-officials-reports/ar-AAIlPlK



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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58128 on: October 6, 2019, 08:12:13 PM »
The Washington Post
‘Out on a limb’: Inside the Republican reckoning over Trump’s possible impeachment
 Robert Costa, Philip Rucker
50 mins ago


A torrent of impeachment developments has triggered a reckoning in the Republican Party, paralyzing many of its officeholders as they weigh their political futures, legacies and, ultimately, their allegiance to a president who has held them captive.

President Trump’s efforts to pressure a foreign power to target a domestic political rival have driven his party into a bunker, with lawmakers bracing for an extended battle led by a general whose orders are often confusing and contradictory.

Should the House impeach Trump, his trial would be in the Senate, where the Republican majority would decide his fate. While GOP senators have engaged in hushed conversations about constitutional and moral considerations, their calculations at this point are almost entirely political.

Even as polling shows an uptick in support nationally for Trump’s impeachment, his command over the Republican base is uncontested, representing a stark warning to any official who dares to cross him.

Across the country, most GOP lawmakers have responded to questions about Trump’s conduct with varying degrees of silence, shrugged shoulders or pained defenses. For now, their collective strategy is simply to survive and not make any sudden moves.

This account of the anxiety gripping the Republican Party is based on interviews with 21 lawmakers, aides and advisers, many of whom spoke on the condition of anonymity to speak candidly.

Trump has been defiant in his defense, insisting his conduct with foreign leaders has been “perfect” and claiming a broad conspiracy by the Democratic Party, the intelligence community and the national media to remove him from office. Yet few Republican lawmakers have been willing to fully parrot White House talking points because they believe they lack credibility or fret they could be contradicted by new discoveries.

“Everyone is getting a little shaky at this point,” said Brendan Buck, who was counselor to former House speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.). “Members have gotten out on a limb with this president many times only to have it be cut off by the president. They know he’s erratic, and this is a completely unsteady and developing situation.”

Republican officials feel acute pressure beyond Trump. The president’s allies on talk radio, Fox News Channel and elsewhere in conservative media have been abuzz with conspiratorial talk of a “deep state” coup attempt and accusations that House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.) and House Democrats are corrupting the impeachment process.

The GOP’s paralysis was on display this past week in Templeton, Iowa, where a voter confronted Sen. Joni Ernst (R) at a town hall meeting Thursday over her silence about Trump’s conduct.

“Where is the line?” Iowa resident Amy Haskins asked in frustration. “When are you guys going to say, ‘Enough,’ and stand up and say, ‘You know what? I’m not backing any of this.’ ”

“I can say, ‘Yea, nay, whatever,’ ” Ernst replied. “The president is going to say what the president is going to do.”

Trump’s extraordinary public request that China investigate 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden — adding to his previous pressure campaign on Ukraine — has sparked divergent reactions among other Republican senators, including over whether the president was being serious when he delivered his plea.

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah), the most outspoken of his colleagues, tweeted Friday: “By all appearances, the President’s brazen and unprecedented appeal to China and to Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden is wrong and appalling.”

By contrast, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) dismissed it as a joke. “I don’t know if that’s a real request or him just needling the press, knowing that you guys were going to get outraged by it,” Rubio told reporters.

On Saturday, Trump on Twitter swatted back at Romney by calling him “a pompous ‘ass’ who has been fighting me from the beginning” — a flashing signal to other Republicans that there would be consequences to speaking out against the president.

Romney called a rough transcript of a phone call between President Trump and the Ukrainian president “deeply troubling.”
Some House Republicans have tried to offer a more forceful defense than their Senate compatriots.

But House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s shaky appearance last weekend on CBS’s “60 Minutes” was widely panned, even among senior GOP aides, and raised questions about whether he was up to the task of protecting Trump. The California Republican falsely accused his interviewer, Scott Pelley, of misrepresenting a key phrase in the transcript of Trump’s July 25 call with Ukrainian president.

But some Trump aides privately said the president likes the messages sent by surrogates such as McCarthy and White House policy adviser Stephen Miller, who are willing to sit for a grilling and disparage the media, according to two Republicans close to the president.

Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), an informal Trump adviser, insisted the president had done “nothing wrong” and denounced those who act “as if he’s guilty until he’s proven innocent.”

“For Republicans to get weak, well, they have a very short memory,” Meadows said, noting that his colleagues facing competitive primary races will need Trump’s support.

Former Republican senator Jeff Flake, a Trump antagonist, said his former colleagues believe the foreign leader interactions under investigation in the House represent “new territory” compared with past challenges, including the Russia investigation.

“There is a concern that he’ll get through it and he’ll exact revenge on those who didn’t stand with him,” Flake said. “There is no love for the president among Senate Republicans, and they aspire to do more than answer questions about his every tweet and issue. But they know this is the president’s party and the bargain’s been made.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff. Trump’s allies on talk radio, Fox News Channel and elsewhere in conservative media have been abuzz with conspiratorial talk of a “deep state” coup attempt and a corruption of the impeachment process by House Democrats.

The responses from most Republicans have infuriated and distressed Democrats, who consider Trump’s conduct a brazen and unconstitutional abuse of power.

“My Republican colleagues’ silence seems unsustainable and inexcusable, given the threat to our national security as well as the integrity of our democratic institutions,” said Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.).

The frenetic reactions underscore how Republicans are navigating this moment on their own, without direction from the White House or clear guidance from the congressional leadership.

Many Republicans also said in interviews last week that Trump’s ability to nominate and confirm dozens of conservative federal judicial nominees and pass an overhaul of the tax code makes it harder to argue to their voters that he is now a burden on the party’s policy agenda.

This is not the first such crossroads, of course. Republicans largely stood behind Trump in 2016 after the release of the “Access Hollywood” tape on which he bragged of sexual assault, as well as during the darkest days of the Russia investigation and in the wake of racist comments.

“It feels like we’ve been constantly moving the line,” said Tom Rath, a GOP fixture in New Hampshire. “We say, ‘Don’t cross this line.’ Okay, you crossed it. So, ‘Don’t cross this line.’ We’re finally at a point where patience is exhausted, reason is exhausted and, quite frankly, the voters are exhausted.”

A Republican strategist who is close with several senators and spoke on the condition of anonymity to share a candid assessment called the situation “a disaster.” This consultant has been advising clients to “say as little as possible” about impeachment developments to buy time.

Since last month’s whistleblower complaint sparked the impeachment inquiry, 48 percent of Americans support impeachment and 46 percent oppose it, according to an average of polls analyzed by The Washington Post. Among Republicans, however, 11 percent support impeachment and 86 percent oppose it, the analysis found.

“There just hasn’t been pushback, and in part it’s because of this perception that he’s like Rasputin with the base with magic powers,” said GOP consultant Mike Murphy, a Trump critic.

Fox News personality Tucker Carlson, who is admired by Trump and occasionally speaks with him, co-wrote an essay in the Daily Caller last week offering a road map for Republicans, writing that “there’s no way to spin” Trump’s request that a foreign leader investigate one of his domestic opponents as proper, but that it did not rise to the level of an impeachable offense.

Veteran party figures said a true break with Trump is possible, but could take months, if not years. Senate Republicans are taking their cues from Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), a taciturn operator who has labored to maintain an uneasy but transactional relationship with Trump.

Though a loyal Republican, McConnell has a history of expressing public concern with an embattled president in his own party. In 1973, McConnell, then a budding Kentucky politician, called the Watergate affair “totally repugnant” and denounced the conduct of President Richard Nixon and some in his administration, as documented by McConnell biographer John David Dyche.

In a new campaign ad released over the weekend, McConnell remained firmly at Trump’s side, saying, “The way that impeachment stops is a Senate majority with me as majority leader.”

Despite anxiety from Senate Republicans, Trump has been defiant in his defense, insisting his conduct with foreign leaders has been “perfect.”
Other than Romney and Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), who also has criticized Trump’s conduct with Ukrainian and Chinese counterparts, others who might break with the president include Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, who is retiring next year, and Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr of North Carolina, according to two top Republicans in close touch with senators.

Still, many more Republicans would have to join them to reach the two-thirds majority in the upper chamber required to convict the president and remove him from office.

“Nobody wants to be the zebra that strays from the pack and gets gobbled up by the lion,” a former senior administration official said in assessing the current consensus among Senate Republicans. “They have to hold hands and jump simultaneously … Then Trump is immediately no longer president and the power he can exert over them and the punishment he can inflict is, in the snap of a finger, almost completely erased.”

Yet with Washington as polarized as at any time in recent history, political winds may not blow strongly enough. As long as impeachment is a Democratic priority driven by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.), it will be difficult — if not impossible — for Senate Republicans to get on board, argued Alex Castellanos, a longtime GOP strategist.

“The more passions swell in Pelosi’s world, the more McConnell will deflate them,” Castellanos said. Impeachment proceedings, he predicted, will be “an overhyped movie with an unsatisfying end.”

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/out-on-a-limb-inside-the-republican-reckoning-over-trumps-possible-impeachment/ar-AAIm4V3?ocid=spartanntp
“Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”

― Ronald Wright, A Short History of Progress

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58129 on: October 6, 2019, 08:15:20 PM »
Hahaha I bet you trump has a big wheel in his office called “whoass fault it are?”  And he just spins it every time there’s a controversy that he created

Offline Red Berry

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58130 on: October 6, 2019, 10:51:36 PM »
Like I said, the GOP are looking for an exit strategy.  More than a dozen GOP senators are retiring next year, and I realise they don't want to muck up the primaries the Republican candidates they would prefer to replace them.  But it will get to a point where a number of them realise, "damned if I do, damned if I don't"; where they know turning on Trump is political suicide, but that they'll likely be fucked if they stick by him - possibly worse.

They have images to save, losses to cut.  They can look to take a time out for a couple of years, rebuild their political stock, and have another crack later on.  Some of the smarter, younger ones will want to sell that message in 10 years time: "I stood up to Trump when it counted".

Even if Trump survives a Senate vote, if just one or two Republicans turn on him to give a small majority in favour of impeachment it could prove to be very damaging.
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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58131 on: October 7, 2019, 12:33:03 AM »

They have images to save, losses to cut.  They can look to take a time out for a couple of years, rebuild their political stock, and have another crack later on.  Some of the smarter, younger ones will want to sell that message in 10 years time: "I stood up to Trump when it counted".


Once you're out you don't want back in.

Since the Net, it's dangerous and hateful to the nth degree.  Shit money - for the hours and lifestyle, little job satisfaction, loads of mither, constant criticism, tough, tough choices.

To be elected in America, you've got to profess to love God  ::) and be squeaky clean.

Once in, you've got to be all things to all people. 

America has a scumbag as President.  In light of the world today many Yanks are fine with that.
“Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”

― Ronald Wright, A Short History of Progress

Offline jambutty

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58132 on: October 7, 2019, 12:42:00 AM »
Speaking of scumbags, here's a treatise on the Yanks economy you might enjoy:

The American Dream Is Killing Us
October 27, 2016
23 minute read
by Mark Manson


Imagine this: you’re a kid again, and you want to sell lemonade in your neighborhood. So you set up your little lemonade stand with your cardboard sign written in crayon and get to work.

The first day, one person comes and buys some lemonade. Then the second day, two people come. Then the third, three. And the fourth, four.

Within a month, you’re serving dozens of people lemonade every day and the demand just keeps growing.

But it gets better. Not only does the whole neighborhood want a taste of your sweet, citrus squeeze, but the price of lemons just seems to keep getting cheaper. At first, you can get five lemons for a dollar. Then the next week you can get eight for a dollar. Then the next you can get twelve. And on and on. Within a few months, you’re a lemonade money-making machine.

Of course, news gets out about your magical lemonade neighborhood. And pretty soon other kids are setting up their lemonade stands all around you.

But it doesn’t matter, the demand just keeps growing. So you welcome these other kids. You tell them, “This is the neighborhood of opportunity, where anyone can sell lemonade and make money.” Meanwhile, as if by magic, more people show up every day for lemonade, and the price of lemons just keep getting cheaper.

You and the other kids realize something: it is impossible to not make money in this neighborhood. The only way not to make money is to be either lazy or completely incompetent.1 Your lemonade opportunities are only limited by the time and energy you’re willing to put into it. The sky is the limit, and the only thing standing between you and your dreams of lemonade riches is yourself.

Unsurprisingly, a culture starts to develop around the neighborhood. Narratives are formed about certain kids who sell lots of lemonade and other kids who don’t. This kid is a genius and sells lemonade 20 hours a day. This kid is a loser who couldn’t sell ice water in a desert, not to mention he probably drinks half of his own stash.

Kids come to see life in a pretty simple way: people get what they deserve. Or put similarly: people deserve whatever they get. And if they want something better, they should have been smarter and/or worked harder for it.

Time goes by. And news of this magical lemonade neighborhood — now serving lemonade to thousands of customers daily — starts to spread widely. Kids start bussing in from faraway neighborhoods to try their hand at making it in the lemonade world. They take the worst jobs squeezing lemons and throwing out garbage because they know that with the boundless opportunity in the lemonade neighborhood, it’s merely a matter of time before they move up and start making good money themselves.

This goes on for months, and the kids in the neighborhood begin to realize something else: that their neighborhood is special. It seems to be chosen by God. After all, if kids are bussing in from all over town just to sell drops of lemonade here, there must be something truly special about the opportunities present. The kids here have far more money. And they work twice as hard as kids anywhere else. This really must be an exceptional place.

But then one day, things begin to change. First, you hear that the Japanese kids across town have figured out how to produce twice the lemonade for half the price, making it impossible for you to compete. Then, there are rumors that the massive influx of poor Chinese kids are undercutting your prices and stealing away your customers.

more…………………………………………


https://markmanson.net/american-dream
“Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”

― Ronald Wright, A Short History of Progress

Offline jambutty

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58133 on: October 7, 2019, 12:57:43 AM »
One of his most cogent points:

The Spanish and Portuguese saw their New World territories as something to be exploited and pillaged. As a result, they did not invest any energy into generating an infrastructure for a sustainable civilization in South or Central America. In fact, they did the opposite. They intentionally kept their populations impoverished and helpless. The British, on the other hand, wanted to build up self-sustaining colonies that it could add to its global network of commerce. The residue of these two European approaches goes a long way to explaining the difference between the North and South that continue today.↵
“Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”

― Ronald Wright, A Short History of Progress

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58134 on: October 7, 2019, 01:00:25 AM »
The Hill
Powell: 'The Republican party has got to get a grip on itself'
 Justine Coleman
2 hrs ago


Former Gen. Colin Powell said the Republican party needs to "get a grip on itself" as Republicans flock to defend the president while the impeachment inquiry continues.

The former secretary of state told a crowd at The Jefferson Series, an event hosted by The New Albany Community Foundation, that Republican leaders need to be comfortable speaking up when they see something wrong.

"The Republican party has got to get a grip on itself," Powell said. "Republican leaders and members of the Congress, both Senate and the House, are holding back because they're terrified of what will happen to any one of them if they speak out."


@CNN
“The Republican party has got to get a grip on itself,” Former Secy. of State Colin Powell on the state of the current GOP. “Republican leaders and members of the Congress… are holding back because they’re terrified of what will happen [to] any one of them if they speak out."


Powell added that the country's foreign policy is "in shambles right now."

"I see things happening that are hard to understand," he said.

The former secretary, who describes himself as a "moderate Republican," referenced the controversy surrounding the president's reported Sharpie extension of the path of Hurricane Dorian to reach Alabama and the administration's efforts to back up the president.

"This is not the way the country is supposed to run," he said. "And Congress is one of the institutions that should be doing something about this."

"We got to remember what the Constitution started with: "We the People," not "Me the President," he added.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/powell-the-republican-party-has-got-to-get-a-grip-on-itself/ar-AAImThM?ocid=spartanntp
“Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”

― Ronald Wright, A Short History of Progress

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58135 on: October 7, 2019, 02:15:13 AM »
Associated Press
AP sources: Trump allies pressed Ukraine over gas firm
 By DESMOND BUTLER, MICHAEL BIESECKER and RICHARD LARDNER, Associated Press
28 mins ago


KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — As Rudy Giuliani was pushing Ukrainian officials last spring to investigate one of Donald Trump's main political rivals, a group of individuals with ties to the president and his personal lawyer were also active in the former Soviet republic.

Their aims were profit, not politics. This circle of businessmen and Republican donors touted connections to Giuliani and Trump while trying to install new management at the top of Ukraine's massive state gas company. Their plan was to then steer lucrative contracts to companies controlled by Trump allies, according to two people with knowledge of their plans.

Their plan hit a snag after Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko lost his reelection bid to Volodymyr Zelenskiy, whose conversation with Trump about former Vice President Joe Biden is now at the center of the House impeachment inquiry of Trump.

But the effort to install a friendlier management team at the helm of the gas company, Naftogaz, would soon be taken up with Ukraine's new president by U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry, whose slate of candidates included a fellow Texan who is one of Perry's past political donors.

It's unclear if Perry's attempts to replace board members at Naftogaz were coordinated with the Giuliani allies pushing for a similar outcome, and no one has alleged that there is criminal activity in any of these efforts. And it's unclear what role, if any, Giuliani had in helping his clients push to get gas sales agreements with the state-owned company.

But the affair shows how those with ties to Trump and his administration were pursuing business deals in Ukraine that went far beyond advancing the president's personal political interests. It also raises questions about whether Trump allies were mixing business and politics just as Republicans were calling for a probe of Biden and his son Hunter, who served five years on the board of another Ukrainian energy company, Burisma.

On Friday, according to the news site Axios, Trump told a group of Republican lawmakers that it had been Perry who had prompted the phone call in which Trump asked Zelenskiy for a "favor" regarding Biden. Axios cited a source saying Trump said Perry had asked Trump to make the call to discuss "something about an LNG (liquefied natural gas) plant."

While it's unclear whether Trump's remark Friday referred specifically to the behind-the-scenes maneuvers this spring involving the multibillion-dollar state gas company, The Associated Press has interviewed four people with direct knowledge of the attempts to influence Naftogaz, and their accounts show Perry playing a key role in the effort. Three of the four spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation. The fourth is an American businessman with close ties to the Ukrainian energy sector.

A spokeswoman for the U.S. Energy Department said Perry, a former Texas governor and Republican presidential candidate, was not advancing anyone's personal interests. She said his conversations with Ukrainian officials about Naftogaz were part of his efforts to reform the country's energy sector and create an environment where Western companies can do business.

The Trump and Giuliani allies driving the attempt to change the senior management at Naftogazt, however, appear to have had inside knowledge of the U.S. government's plans in Ukraine. For example, they told people that Trump would replace the U.S. ambassador there months before she was actually recalled to Washington, according to three of the individuals interviewed by the AP. One of the individuals said he was so concerned by the whole affair that he reported it to a U.S. Embassy official in Ukraine months ago.

THE BUSINESSMEN

Ukraine, a resource-rich nation that sits on the geographic and symbolic border between Russia and the West, has long been plagued by corruption and government dysfunction, making it a magnet for foreign profiteers.

At the center of the Naftogaz plan, according to three individuals familiar with the details, were three such businessmen: two Soviet-born Florida real estate entrepreneurs, Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, and an oil magnate from Boca Raton, Florida, named Harry Sargeant III.

Parnas and Fruman have made hundreds of thousands of dollars in political donations to Republicans, including $325,000 to a Trump-allied political action committee in 2018. This helped the relatively unknown entrepreneurs gain access to top levels of the Republican Party — including meetings with Trump at the White House and Mar-a-Lago.

The two have also faced lawsuits from disgruntled investors over unpaid debts. During the same period they were pursuing the Naftogaz deal, the two were coordinating with Giuliani to set up meetings with Ukrainian government officials and push for an investigation of the Bidens.

Sargeant, his wife and corporate entities tied to the family have donated at least $1.2 million to Republican campaigns and PACs over the last 20 years, including $100,000 in June to the Trump Victory Fund, according to federal and state campaign finance records. He has also served as finance chair of the Florida state GOP, and gave nearly $14,000 to Giuliani's failed 2008 presidential campaign.

In early March, Fruman, Parnas and Sargeant were touting a plan to replace Naftogaz CEO Andriy Kobolyev with another senior executive at the company, Andrew Favorov, according to two individuals who spoke to the AP as well as a memorandum about the meeting that was later submitted to the U.S. Embassy in Kiev.

Going back to the Obama administration, the U.S. Energy Department and the State Department have long supported efforts to import American natural gas into Ukraine to reduce the country's dependence on Russia.

The three approached Favorov with the idea while the Ukrainian executive was attending an energy industry conference in Texas. Parnas and Fruman told him they had flown in from Florida on a private jet to recruit him to be their partner in a new venture to export up to 100 tanker shipments a year of U.S. liquefied gas into Ukraine, where Naftogaz is the largest distributor, according to two people briefed on the details.

Sargeant told Favorov that he regularly meets with Trump at Mar-a-Lago and that the gas-sales plan had the president's full support, according to the two people who said Favorov recounted the discussion to them.

These conversations were recounted to AP by Dale W. Perry, an American who is a former business partner of Favorov. He told AP in an interview that Favorov described the meeting to him soon after it happened and that Favorov perceived it to be a shakedown. Perry, who is no relation to the energy secretary, is the managing partner of Energy Resources of Ukraine, which currently has business agreements to import natural gas and electricity to Ukraine.

A second person who spoke on condition of anonymity also confirmed to the AP that Favorov had recounted details of the Houston meeting to him.

According to Dale Perry and the other person, Favorov said Parnas told him Trump planned to remove U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch and replace her with someone more open to aiding their business interests.

Dale Perry told the AP he was so concerned about the efforts to change the management at Naftogaz and to get rid of Yovanovitch that he reported what he had heard to Suriya Jayanti, a State Department foreign service officer stationed at the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv who focuses on the energy industry.

He also wrote a detailed memo about Favorov's account, dated April 12, which was shared with another current State Department official. Perry recently provided a copy of the April memo to AP.

Jayanti declined to provide comment. Favorov also declined to comment.

On March 24, Giuliani and Parnas gathered at the Trump International Hotel in Washington with Healy E. Baumgardner, a former Trump campaign adviser who once served as deputy communications director for Giuliani's presidential campaign and as a communications official during the George W. Bush administration.

She is now listed as the CEO of 45 Energy Group, a Houston-based energy company whose website describes it as a "government relations, public affairs and business development practice group."

This was a couple of weeks after the Houston meeting with Favorov, the Naftogaz executive. Giuliani, Parnas and Baumgardner were there to make a business pitch involving gas deals in the former Soviet bloc to a potential investor.

This time, according to Giuliani, the deals that were discussed involved Uzbekistan, not Ukraine.

"I have not pursued a deal in the Ukraine. I don't know about a deal in the Ukraine. I would not do a deal in the Ukraine now, obviously," said Giuliani, reached while attending a playoff baseball game between the New York Yankees and Minnesota Twins. "There is absolutely no proof that I did it, because I didn't do it."

During this meeting, Parnas again repeated that Yovanovitch, the U.S. ambassador in Kyiv, would soon be replaced, according to a person with direct knowledge of the gathering. She was removed two months later.

Giuliani, who serves as Trump's personal lawyer and has no official role in government, acknowledged Friday that he was among those pushing the president to replace the ambassador, a career diplomat with a history of fighting corruption.

"The ambassador to Ukraine was replaced," he said. "I did play a role in that."

But Giuliani refused to discuss the details of his business dealings, or whether he helped his associates in their push to forge gas sales contracts with the Ukrainian company. He did describe Sergeant as a friend and referred to Parnas and Fruman as his clients in a tweet in May.

As part of their impeachment inquiry, House Democrats have subpoenaed Giuliani for documents and communications related to dozens of people, including Favorov, Parnas, Fruman and Baumgardner's 45 Energy Group.

Baumgardner issued a written statement, saying: "While I won't comment on business discussions, I will say this: this political assault on private business by the Democrats in Congress is complete harassment and an invasion of privacy that should scare the hell out of every American business owner."

Sargeant did not respond to a voice message left at a number listed for him at an address in Boca Raton.

John Dowd, a former Trump attorney who now represents Parnas and Fruman, said it was actually the Naftogaz executives who approached his clients about making a deal. He says they then met with Rick Perry to get the Energy Department on board.

"The people from the company solicited my clients because Igor is in the gas business, and they asked them, and they flew to Washington and they solicited," Dowd said. "They sat down and talked about it. And then it was presented to Secretary Perry to see if they could get it together.

"It wasn't a shakedown; it was an attempt to do legitimate business that didn't work out."

THE ENERGY SECRETARY

In May, Rick Perry traveled to Kyiv to serve as the senior U.S. government representative at the inauguration of the county's new president.

In a private meeting with Zelenskiy, Perry pressed the Ukrainian president to fire members of the Naftogaz advisory board. Attendees left the meeting with the impression that Perry wanted to replace the American representative, Amos Hochstein, a former diplomat and energy representative who served in the Obama administration, with someone "reputable in Republican circles," according to someone who was in the room.

A second meeting during the trip, at a Kyiv hotel, included Ukrainian officials and energy sector people. There, Perry made clear that the Trump administration wanted to see the entire Naftogaz supervisory board replaced, according to a person who attended both meetings. Perry again referenced the list of advisers that he had given Zelenskiy, and it was widely interpreted that he wanted Michael Bleyzer, a Ukrainian-American businessman from Texas, to join the newly formed board, the person said. Also on the list was Robert Bensh, another Texan who frequently works in Ukraine, the Energy Department confirmed.

Gordon D. Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, and Kurt D. Volker, then the State Department's special envoy to Ukraine, were also in the room, according to photographs reviewed by AP. The person, who spoke on condition of anonymity due to fear of retaliation, said he was floored by the American requests because the person had always viewed the U.S. government "as having a higher ethical standard."

The Naftogaz supervisory board is supposed to be selected by the Ukrainian president's Cabinet in consultation with international institutions, including the International Monetary Fund, the United States and the European Union. It must be approved by the Ukrainian Cabinet. Ukrainian officials perceived Perry's push to swap out the board as circumventing that established process, according to the person in the room.

U.S. Energy Department spokeswoman Shaylyn Hynes said Perry had consistently called for the modernization of Ukraine's business and energy sector in an effort to create an environment that will incentivize Western companies to do business there. She said Perry delivered that same message in the May meeting with Zelenskiy.

"What he did not do is advocate for the business interests of any one individual or company," Hynes said Saturday. "That is fiction being pushed by those who are disingenuously seeking to advance a nefarious narrative that does not exist."

Hynes said the Ukrainian government had requested U.S. recommendations to advise the country on energy matters, and Perry provided those recommendations. She confirmed Bleyzer was on the list.

Bleyzer, whose company is based in Houston, did not respond on Saturday to a voicemail seeking comment. Bensh also did not respond to a phone message.

As a former Texas governor, Perry has always had close ties to the oil and gas industry. He appointed Bleyzer to a two-year term on a state technologies fund board in 2009. The following year, records show Bleyzer donated $20,000 to Perry's reelection campaign.

Zelenskiy's office declined to comment on Saturday.

In an interview Friday with the Christian Broadcasting Network, Perry said that "as God as my witness" he never discussed Biden or his son in meetings with Ukrainian or U.S. officials, including Trump or Giuliani.

"This has been a very intense, a very focused push to get Ukraine to clean up the corruption," Perry said in the interview. "I can't go in good faith and tell a U.S. company, go and invest here, go and be involved if the corruption is ongoing."

He did confirm he had had a conversation with Giuliani by phone, but a spokeswoman for the energy secretary declined to say when that call was or whether the two had discussed Naftogaz.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/ap-sources-trump-allies-pressed-ukraine-over-gas-firm/ar-AAInI5H?ocid=spartanntp
“Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”

― Ronald Wright, A Short History of Progress

Offline soxfan

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58136 on: October 7, 2019, 02:26:59 AM »
White evangelicals love Trump and aren't confused about why. No one should be.
By Anthea Butler

Focusing on the disconnect between Trump's actions and the moral aspects of evangelicals' faith misses the issue that keeps their support firm.

Liberals have a tendency to wring their hands at the strong support President Donald Trump — he of the three wives and multiple affairs, and a tendency to engage in exceedingly un-Christian-like behavior at the slightest provocation — continues to receive from the white evangelical community. White evangelical support for Donald Trump is still at 73 percent, and more than 80 percent of white evangelicals voted for him in 2016.

But focusing on the disconnect between Trump's personal actions and the moral aspects of their faith misses the issue that keeps their support firm: racism. Modern evangelicals' support for this president cannot be separated from the history of evangelicals' participation in and support for racist structures in America.

Evangelicals, in religious terminology, believe that Jesus Christ is the savior of humanity. They have a long history in America, and include a number of different groups, including Baptists, Pentecostals, Methodists and nondenominational churches. After the schism among the Baptists, Methodists and Presbyterians in the 1850s over slavery, conservative denominations like the Southern Baptists — who defended slavery through their readings of scripture — came into being. And because the primary schisms between northern and southern denominations was over the issues of slavery, in the pre- and post-Civil War years, African American Protestants formed their own denominations.

Evangelical denominations formed from these splits in the South were usually comprised of people who had made money from slavery or supported it. After the Civil War many were more likely to have supported the Ku Klux Klan and approved of (or participated in) lynching. The burning cross of the KKK, for instance, was a symbol of white Christian supremacy, designed both to put fear into the hearts of African Americans and to highlight the supposed Christian righteousness of the terrorist act.

During the civil rights movement, many white evangelicals either outright opposed Martin Luther King Jr. or, like Billy Graham, believed that racial harmony would only come about when the nation turned to God. in the 1970s, evangelicalism became synonymous with being "born again" and also against abortion and, with the rise of the Moral Majority in the late 1970s, they began to seek not only moral, but political power.

Ronald Reagan, who also counted evangelicals among his most vociferous supporters, started his presidential campaign on the platform of states’ rights from Philadelphia, Mississippi, where Michael Schwerner, James Chaney and Andrew Goodman were murdered by several Klansmen with the participation of local law enforcement in 1964, while attempting to register African Americans to vote. Decades later, the Rev. Jerry Falwell, the evangelical leader, opposed sanctions on South Africa's apartheid regime and insulted Bishop Desmond Tutu, a Nobel Prize Peace winner, as a "phony."

After 9/11, many evangelicals vilified Islam and created cottage industries and ministries promoting Islamophobia. And when Barack Obama was elected president, they regrouped, bought guns and became Tea Partiers who promoted fiscal responsibility and indulged in birtherism, promoted by no less than the son of Billy Graham, Franklin.

Still, evangelicals have worked to make a good show of repenting for racism. From the racial reconciliation meetings of the 1990s to today, they have dutifully declared racism a sin, and Southern Baptists have apologized again for their role in American slavery — most recently in 2018 via a document outlining their role.

But statements are not enough. Proving how disconnected they are from their statements about atoning for the sin of racism, the 2019 Annual Convention of the Southern Baptists was opened with a gavel owned by John A. Broadus, a slaveholder, white supremacist and the founder of their seminary. In the meantime, the most visible Southern Baptist pastor, Robert Jeffress of First Baptist Dallas, recently said of Trump that “he does not judge people by the color of their skin, but whether or not they support him,” calling that "the definition of colorblind." (Jeffress is such a supporter of Trump that he regularly extols him on Fox News, and even wrote a special song for Trump’s Campaign, "Make America Great Again.")

So it's not surprising that white evangelicals supported the Muslim ban, are the least likely to accept refugees into the country (according to the Pew Foundation) and, though a slim majority oppose it, are the denomination most likely to support Trump's child separation policy. White evangelicals certainly are not concerned with white supremacy, because they are often white supremacists.

And Trump appeals to these evangelicals because of his focus on declension, decline and destruction, which fits into evangelical beliefs about the end times. When Trump used the term “American carnage” in his inaugural address, evangelicals listened; they too, believed America is in decline. Their imagined powerlessness, and the need for a strong authoritarian leader to protect them, is at the root of their racial and social animus. Their persecution complex is a heady mix of their fear of “socialists,” Muslims, independent women, LGBT people and immigration. Their feelings of fragility, despite positions of power, make them vote for people like Donald Trump — and morally suspect candidates like Roy Moore. Rhetoric, not morality, drives their voting habits.

All of this has made a mockery of white evangelical protestations about morality and the family. Moral issues once drove white evangelical votes but, first when Obama was elected and then when the Supreme Court struck down the federal ban on same sex marriage in June of 2015, what remained was their fear. Trump promised justices and a return to a time when they felt less fear, and he delivered, at least on the former. White evangelical fealty to him is firm. Evangelicals in America are not simply a religious group; they are a political group inexorably linked to the Republican Party.

Trump delivered evangelicals from the shame of losing, and they will back him again in 2020 to avoid losing again. So perhaps we should take evangelicals at their word that they will support Trump come hell or high water, rather than twisting ourselves into knots trying to figure out why.

Anthea Butler is an associate professor of Religious Studies and Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of "Women in the Church of God in Christ: Making A Sanctified World" (The University of North Carolina Press) and her forthcoming book is tentatively titled “From Palin to Trump: Evangelicals, Race, and Nationalism” (The New Press).

https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/white-evangelicals-love-trump-aren-t-confused-about-why-no-ncna1046826


Offline Red Berry

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58137 on: October 7, 2019, 07:44:56 AM »
Once you're out you don't want back in.

Since the Net, it's dangerous and hateful to the nth degree.  Shit money - for the hours and lifestyle, little job satisfaction, loads of mither, constant criticism, tough, tough choices.

To be elected in America, you've got to profess to love God  ::) and be squeaky clean.

Once in, you've got to be all things to all people. 

America has a scumbag as President.  In light of the world today many Yanks are fine with that.

Nah. It's a drug. They always want to come back. Look at Mitt Romney.  The likes of McConnell, and even Biden,  should be enjoying retirement.

When you have a taste of power, the perks and the privileges, you dont just shake that off. Especially if you start to feel some orange skinned numb nuts chased you out of the game. They'll ho back in.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

I don't always visit Lobster Pot.  But when I do, I sit.

PROJECT WAKE UP UK

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58138 on: October 7, 2019, 10:29:20 AM »
Associated Press
New whistleblower may give House Democrats fresh leads
 By ERIC TUCKER, RICHARD LARDNER and JILL COLVIN, Associated Press
2 hrs ago


WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats leading an impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump's dealings with Ukraine may have fresh information to work with after a new whistleblower stepped forward with what the person's lawyer said were firsthand knowledge of key events.

With Congress out for another week and many Republicans reticent to speak out, a text from attorney Mark Zaid that a second individual had emerged and could corroborate the original whistleblower's complaint gripped Washington and potentially heightened the stakes for Trump.

Zaid, who represents both whistleblowers, told The Associated Press that the new whistleblower works in the intelligence field and has spoken to the intelligence community's internal watchdog.

The original whistleblower, a CIA officer, filed a formal complaint with the inspector general in August that triggered the impeachment inquiry. The document alleged that Trump had used a July telephone call with Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to investigate a political rival, Joe Biden, and his son Hunter, prompting a White House cover-up.

The push came even though there was no evidence of wrongdoing by the former vice president or his son, who served on the board of a Ukrainian gas company. Trump and his supporters deny that he did anything improper, but the White House has struggled to come up with a unified response.

A second whistleblower with direct knowledge could undermine efforts by Trump and his allies to discredit the original complaint. They have called it politically motivated, claimed it was filed improperly and dismissed it as unreliable because it was based on secondhand or thirdhand information.

A rough transcript of Trump's call with Zelenskiy, released by the White House, has already corroborated the complaint's central claim that Trump sought to pressure Ukraine on the investigation.

Text messages from State Department officials revealed other details, including that Ukraine was promised a visit with Trump if the government would agree to investigate the 2016 election and a Ukrainian gas company tied to Biden's son — the outline of a potential quid pro quo.

Rep. Jim Himes, D-Conn., a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said word of a second whistleblower indicates a larger shift inside the government.

"The president's real problem is that his behavior has finally gotten to a place where people are saying, 'Enough,'" Himes said.

On Sept. 25, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi initiated an impeachment inquiry against President Trump, following the whistle-blower complaint over his dealings with Ukraine. Select Congressional committees returned to the Capitol to continue impeachment proceedings throughout the week as Congress remains on recess.

Democrats have zeroed in on the State Department in the opening phase of their impeachment investigation. The Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs committees have already interviewed Kurt Volker, a former special envoy to Ukraine who provided the text messages, and least two other witnesses are set for depositions this week: Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, and Marie Yovanovitch, who was abruptly ousted as the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine in May.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., one of Trump's most vocal backers, provided perhaps the strongest defense of the president. He said there was nothing wrong with Trump's July conversation with Zelenskiy and said the accusations look like a "political setup."

As for Trump, rather than visiting his nearby golf course in Sterling, Virginia, for a second day, he stayed at the White House on Sunday, where he tweeted and retweeted, with the Bidens a main target.

"The great Scam is being revealed!" Trump wrote at one point, continuing to paint himself as the victim of a "deep state" and hostile Democrats.

Aside from Trump's attempt to pressure Zelenskiy, the July call has raised questions about whether Trump held back near $400 million in critical American military aid to Ukraine as leverage for an investigation of Burisma, a Ukrainian gas company.

Hunter Biden served on the board of Burisma at the same time his father was leading the Obama administration's diplomatic dealings with Ukraine. Though the timing raised concerns among anti-corruption advocates, there has been no evidence of wrongdoing by either Biden.

Joe Biden, a leading candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, wrote in The Washington Post that he had a message for Trump and "those who facilitate his abuses of power. ... Please know that I'm not going anywhere. You won't destroy me, and you won't destroy my family."

Additional details about the origins of Trump's July 25 call with Zelenskiy have emerged over the weekend.

Energy Secretary Rick Perry had encouraged Trump to speak with the Ukrainian leader, but on energy and economic issues, according to spokeswoman Shaylyn Hynes. She said Perry's interest in Ukraine is part of U.S. efforts to boost Western energy ties to Eastern Europe.

Trump, who has repeatedly has described his conversation with Zelenskiy as "perfect," told House Republicans on Friday night that it was Perry who teed up the July call, according to a person familiar with Trump's comments who was granted anonymity to discuss them. The person said Trump did not suggest that Perry had anything to do with the pressure to investigate the Bidens.

Himes appeared on CBS' "Face the Nation" while Graham spoke on Fox News Channel's "Sunday Morning Futures."

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/new-whistleblower-may-give-house-democrats-fresh-leads/ar-AAIo3nM?ocid=spartandhp
“Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”

― Ronald Wright, A Short History of Progress

Offline jambutty

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58139 on: October 7, 2019, 10:33:39 AM »
Washington Examiner
Trump accuses Pelosi of 'treason' and calls for her to be 'immediately impeached'
 Carlin Becker
5 hrs ago


President Trump accused House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of treason and called for her, along with House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, to be impeached.

"Nancy Pelosi knew of all of the many Shifty Adam Schiff lies and massive frauds perpetrated upon Congress and the American people, in the form of a fraudulent speech knowingly delivered as a ruthless con, and the illegal meetings with a highly partisan 'Whistleblower' & lawyer," he tweeted Sunday night.

The president continued, "This makes Nervous Nancy every bit as guilty as Liddle’ Adam Schiff for High Crimes and Misdemeanors, and even Treason. I guess that means that they, along with all of those that evilly 'Colluded' with them, must all be immediately Impeached!"


Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
Nancy Pelosi knew of all of the many Shifty Adam Schiff lies and massive frauds perpetrated upon Congress and the American people, in the form of a fraudulent speech knowingly delivered as a ruthless con, and the illegal meetings with a highly partisan “Whistleblower” & lawyer...

Trump has repeatedly railed against Schiff ever since the California Democrat read a summarization of the president's July phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, during which Trump asked the foreign leader to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, the 2020 Democratic front-runner, and his son Hunter.

In addition to calling on Schiff to resign, the president has accused the congressman of helping to write an intelligence community whistleblower's complaint about the call, which paved the way for House Democrats to launch an impeachment inquiry into Trump, after news broke that the unnamed CIA officer spoke with House Intelligence staff before filing the complaint.

Schiff has defended his rendition of Trump's phone call as "at least in part parody" but faced backlash for his earlier knowledge of the complaint. Over the weekend, a second whistleblower with more direct information on the president's dealings with Ukraine came forward.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/trump-accuses-pelosi-of-treason-and-calls-for-her-to-be-immediately-impeached/ar-AAInMiX?ocid=spartandhp


"I'm not a puppet!"  "You're a puppet!"
“Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”

― Ronald Wright, A Short History of Progress

Offline ShakaHislop

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58140 on: October 7, 2019, 01:03:41 PM »
US troops make way for Turkey operation against Kurds in Syria

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has confirmed that US troops have started withdrawing from positions in northern Syria.

Mr Erdogan spoke hours after the White House said American forces in north-east Syria will move aside and clear the way for an expected Turkish incursion.

The announcement has cast uncertainty on the fate of Kurdish fighters allied with the US against the so-called Islamic State group (IS).

Turkey has threatened for months to launch a military operation to drive away Syrian Kurdish fighters from a border region east of the Euphrates River.

Mr Erdogan said Turkey is determined to halt what it perceives as threats from the Syrian Kurdish fighters.

He also said he planned to travel to Washington next month to meet with US President Donald Trump.

The US move essentially abandons Kurdish fighters who fought alongside American forces in the years-long battle to defeat IS.

The Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) said the move comes as Turkey is preparing to attack Kurdish-held areas in north-east Syria.

The group's statement warns the Turkish invasion would be a blow to the fight against IS militants.

The Kurdish Hawar news agency and the UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights also said American troops were evacuating positions near the towns of Ras al-Ayn and Tal Abyad on Monday.

The Syrian Kurdish fighters also accused Washington of failing to abide by its commitments to its key allies in the fight against IS.

The move marks a major shift in US policy.

There has been no immediate comment on the pullout from US officials.

Mr Erdogan has threatened for months to launch the military operation across the border.

He views the Syrian Kurdish forces as a threat to his country, as Ankara struggles with a Kurdish insurgency within Turkey.

In the US, Republicans and Democrats have warned that allowing the Turkish attack could lead to a massacre of the Kurds and send a troubling message to American allies across the globe.

The SDF said: "The American forces did not abide by their commitments and withdrew their forces along the border with Turkey.

"Turkey now is preparing to invade northern and eastern parts of Syria."

In March, the group captured the last sliver of land held by the extremists, marking the end of the so-called caliphate that was declared by IS's leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in 2014.

The SDF said: "We will not hesitate for a moment in defending our people" against Turkish troops, adding that it has lost 11,000 fighters in the war against IS in Syria.

A Turkish attack would lead to a resurgence of IS, it said. IS sleeper cells are already plotting to break free some 12,000 militants detained by Syrian Kurdish fighters in north-eastern Syria in a "threat to local and international security".

The Kurdish fighters also control the al-Hol camp, home to more than 70,000 mostly wives and children of IS fighters.

Turkish foreign minister Mevlut Cavusoglu tweeted that since the beginning of the crisis in Syria, "we have supported the territorial integrity of this country, and we will continue to support it".

He added that Ankara is determined to ensure the survival and security of Turkey "by clearing the region from terrorists. We will contribute to peace, peace and stability in Syria".

https://www.itv.com/news/2019-10-07/turkey-to-invade-northern-syria-says-white-house/

Offline Giono

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58141 on: October 7, 2019, 01:11:40 PM »

So Trump is abandoning the Kurds to Turkey. Convinced them to take down their defences with protection guarantees and then abandons them to Turkey. Foolish Kurds...if it is you vs Trump Tower there is only one winner.



Ivanka Trump (@IvankaTrump)
2012-04-20, 8:56 AM
Thank you Prime Minister Erdogan for joining us yesterday to celebrate the launch of #TrumpTowers Istanbul!




She's such a feminist ain't she...
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Offline thejbs

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58142 on: October 7, 2019, 01:47:06 PM »
So Trump is abandoning the Kurds to Turkey. Convinced them to take down their defences with protection guarantees and then abandons them to Turkey. Foolish Kurds...if it is you vs Trump Tower there is only one winner.

Relax, it's not like anyone in the region has been abandoned by the USA in the past and, as a result, gone on to form anti-western terror groups that caused hundreds of thousands of deaths... it's all fine...


Offline So... Howard Phillips

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58143 on: October 7, 2019, 02:01:58 PM »
Relax, it's not like anyone in the region has been abandoned by the USA in the past and, as a result, gone on to form anti-western terror groups that caused hundreds of thousands of deaths... it's all fine...

And it's not the first time the USA has abandoned the Kurds either.

Offline ShakaHislop

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58144 on: October 7, 2019, 03:12:49 PM »
Former Italian PM Renzi to sue former Trump aide over smear claims

Quote
ROME (Reuters) - Former Italian prime minister, Matteo Renzi, said on Friday he would sue George Papadopoulos, a one-time campaign aide for U.S. President Donald Trump, over allegations that Renzi had tried to undermine Trump’s 2016 election campaign.

In an interview published earlier on Friday, Papadopoulos told the Italian daily La Verita he believed Renzi had acted on the orders of former U.S. President Barack Obama to “strike a low blow” against Trump in the run-up to the 2016 vote.

Renzi denied the allegation in a post on Facebook, saying Papadopoulos’s accusation was “seriously damaging to my reputation.” He added: “See you in court.”

Papadopoulos shot back on Twitter, calling Renzi “the failed former Italian Prime Minister,” and reiterating his accusation that Renzi had attempted to interfere in the U.S. election.

Earlier in the day, Papadopoulos had tweeted that “The Italian spygate story will cost Matteo Renzi, Italy’s former socialist prime minister in 2016, his political career,” posting a photo of his interview with La Verita.

Papadopoulos, plucked out of obscurity to work as a foreign policy adviser for Trump's presidential run, pleaded guilty in October 2017 to lying to the FBI here about contacts with people who claimed to have ties to top Russian officials, in the first criminal charges alleging links between the campaign and Moscow.

U.S. intelligence agencies here and Special Counsel Robert Mueller have concluded that Russia interfered here in the 2016 election with a scheme of hacking and propaganda to boost Trump's candidacy and disparage his opponent Hillary Clinton.

Under his plea deal, Papadopoulos said the Maltese academic, Joseph Mifsud, had told him in April 2016 that Russia had “dirt” on Clinton, the Democratic candidate at the time for the presidency.

Papadopoulos first met Mifsud in Rome and he alleged in comments to La Verita that the CIA and FBI had used “people like Mifsud” to spy on him and to try to sabotage the Trump presidential campaign.

“I think it was impossible for such an operation to take place without the knowledge of the government of the day. Renzi was taking orders from someone and he was very happy to obey,” Papadopoulos was quoted as saying.

The case has returned to the fore following reports that U.S. Attorney General William Barr held secret meetings here with Italian intelligence agencies in Rome as part of an investigation by Trump's administration into the origins of the inquiry into Russian interference in the 2016 American election.

A source close to the matter told Reuters on Thursday that Barr met with Italian intelligence officials in Rome on Sept. 27.

Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte, who is in charge of Italy’s secret services, said on Friday the intelligence chiefs “committed no misconduct or anomaly.”

“Everything was done transparently,” Conte told reporters, adding he would only comment further on the matter in testimony to a parliamentary committee on security.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-italy-renzi-idUSKBN1WJ1SF

Offline ShakaHislop

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58145 on: October 7, 2019, 03:16:09 PM »
Trump says 'too costly' to back Kurdish forces in Syria

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday defended a decision to withdraw U.S. troops from northern Syria, saying it was too costly to keep supporting U.S-allied, Kurdish-led forces in the region fighting Islamic State militants.

“The Kurds fought with us, but were paid massive amounts of money and equipment to do so. They have been fighting Turkey for decades,” Trump said in a series of tweets.

“Turkey, Europe, Syria, Iran, Iraq, Russia and the Kurds will now have to figure the situation out,” Trump said.

The Trump administration’s move, which opens the way for a Turkish strike on Kurdish fighters long aligned with Washington, runs counter to the positions of even some of Trump’s top allies in his own party.

Lindsey Graham, a Republican senator who is generally a vocal Trump supporter, wrote in a series of Twitter posts that he was trying to set up a call with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and would introduce a Senate resolution opposing the withdrawal decision and calling for it to be reversed.

“It’s never in our national security interest to abandon an ally who’s helped us fight ISIS,” Graham said in an interview with Fox News Channel, using an acronym for Islamic State.

“This impulsive decision by the president has undone all the gains we’ve made, thrown the region into further chaos.”

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-syria-security-turkey-usa-trump/trump-says-too-costly-to-back-kurdish-forces-in-syria-idUSKBN1WM18K

Offline ShakaHislop

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58146 on: October 7, 2019, 03:28:22 PM »
Trump tax returns must be given to prosecutor, judge rules

A judge has ordered US President Donald Trump to hand over eight years of his tax returns to a New York state criminal investigation.

The judge rejected arguments by the president's lawyers that total immunity protects him while in office.

Mr Trump is the only presidential candidate since the 1960s apart from Gerald Ford not to release tax returns.

The ruling helps an investigation into hush money paid to two women who claim they had affairs with Mr Trump.

In his 75-page decision on Monday, Judge Victor Marrero said he could not allow a "categorical and limitless assertion of presidential immunity from judicial process".

"The only truly absolute about presidential immunity from criminal process is the Constitution' s silence about the existence and contours of such an exemption," he wrote.

Judge Marrero concluded that the president's argument, at its core, was "repugnant to the nation's governmental structure and constitutional values".

Mr Trump's lawyers immediately filed an emergency appeal with a higher court.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-49963910

Offline rafathegaffa83

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58147 on: October 7, 2019, 04:54:43 PM »
Donald J. Trump@realDonaldTrump
As I have stated strongly before, and just to reiterate, if Turkey does anything that I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits, I will totally destroy and obliterate the Economy of Turkey (I’ve done before!). They must, with Europe and others, watch over...

Donald J. Trump@realDonaldTrump
....the captured ISIS fighters and families. The U.S. has done far more than anyone could have ever expected, including the capture of 100% of the ISIS Caliphate. It is time now for others in the region, some of great wealth, to protect their own territory. THE USA IS GREAT!

Offline Chakan

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58148 on: October 7, 2019, 04:55:53 PM »
He's obliterated the economy of Turkey before?

Offline rafathegaffa83

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58149 on: October 7, 2019, 04:59:37 PM »
He's obliterated the economy of Turkey before?

Through his great and unmatched wisdom apparently

Offline Craig 🤔

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58150 on: October 7, 2019, 05:03:58 PM »
“Great and unmatched wisdom”

Fucking hell, if anyone needed any further evidence of this guys megalomanicatic tendencies then there it is...!

Offline Chakan

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58151 on: October 7, 2019, 05:04:42 PM »
Makes me all very sad this, you have to wonder how we ended up here.

Offline Red Berry

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58152 on: October 7, 2019, 05:12:45 PM »
Good grief... those tweets.  :o

Maybe he should add "God is Great" to the American flag?
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Offline ShakaHislop

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58153 on: October 7, 2019, 05:19:59 PM »
He's obliterated the economy of Turkey before?

I assume he's referring to the tariffs he increased in August 2018 when the two countries fell out over a US pastor that was being held in Turkey on suspicion of having links to those Turkey believes were involved with the failed coup there in 2016.

Trump doubles metal tariffs on Turkey as lira falls by 20%
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-45123607

Trump made similar threats to the ones he's made today back in January of this year.

Turkey dismisses Trump threat to economy over Syrian Kurds
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-46860902
« Last Edit: October 7, 2019, 05:25:04 PM by ShakaHislop »

Offline Kekule

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58154 on: October 7, 2019, 05:22:32 PM »
“In my great and unmatched wisdom”.

Aren’t dictators supposed to have people say that for them?  I guess saying it has been a step to far even his biggest sycophants so he has to try it out himself.

Ought to set a few more alarm bells ringing though.

Offline filopastry

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58155 on: October 7, 2019, 05:22:54 PM »
He's always been utterly nasty, but he just appears increasingly unhinged now

Offline jambutty

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58156 on: October 7, 2019, 05:41:11 PM »
Maybe he's parodying Liddle Shifty Adam Schitt.

A legend in his own mind.

Clearly unhinged.
“Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”

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Offline jambutty

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58157 on: October 7, 2019, 05:45:21 PM »
Associated Press
Trump's Syria withdrawal announcement draws GOP condemnation
 By ZEKE MILLER, LOLITA C. BALDOR and JILL COLVIN, Associated Press
48 mins ago


WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's sudden decision to pull back U.S. troops from northern Syria drew quick criticism Monday from some of his closest allies in Congress as well as Kurdish fighters who would essentially be abandoned to face a likely Turkish assault after fighting alongside American forces against the Islamic State.

The announcement threw the military situation in Syria into fresh chaos and injected deeper uncertainty into U.S. relations with European allies. Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham called it "a disaster," while Syria's Kurds accused the U.S. of turning its back on allies and risking gains made in the yearslong fight against ISIS.

Trump defended the move in a series of tweets, acknowledging that "the Kurds fought with us," but adding that they "were paid massive amounts of money and equipment to do so."

"I held off this fight for almost 3 years, but it is time for us to get out of these ridiculous Endless Wars, many of them tribal, and bring our soldiers home," he wrote, adding, in all capital letters, that "We will fight where it is to our benefit, and only fight to win."

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has threatened for months to launch a military operation across the Syrian border. He views the Kurdish forces as a threat to his country. Both Republicans and Democrats in the U.S. have warned that allowing the Turkish attack could lead to a massacre of the Kurds and send a troubling message to American allies across the globe.

U.S. troops "will not support or be involved in the operation" and "will no longer be in the immediate area," in northern Syria, White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said in an unusual late-Sunday statement that was silent on the fate of the Kurds.

There are about 1,000 U.S. troops in northern Syria, and a senior U.S. official said they will pull back from the area — and potentially depart the country entirely should widespread fighting break out between Turkish and Kurdish forces.

A U.S. official confirmed that American troops were already moving out of the security zone area, which includes the Syrian towns of Ras al-Ayn and Tal Abyad. That official was not authorized to speak for the record and was granted anonymity to comment.

Trump's move appeared to take even his closest allies by surprise during a pivotal moment of his presidency. House Democrats are marching forward with their impeachment inquiry into whether he compromised national security or abused his office by seeking negative information on former Vice President Joe Biden, a political rival, from foreign countries.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., did say Monday in an appearance on "Fox & Friends" that he had been briefed by the president about the decision. But he also said he had concerns.

"I want to make sure we keep our word for those who fight with us and help us," he said, adding that, "If you make a commitment and somebody is fighting with you, America should keep their word."

Graham, R-S.C., one of Trump's most vocal backers, also called in to "Fox and Friends" to share his dismay, calling the decision "short-sighted and irresponsible."

"This impulsive decision by the president has undone all the gains we've made, thrown the region into further chaos. Iran is licking their chops. And if I'm an ISIS fighter, I've got a second lease on life," he said. "I like president Trump. I've tried to help him. This to me is just unnerving to its core."

Former Trump administration officials also expressed alarm.

Nikki Haley, who served as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, said the U.S. "must always have the backs of our allies, if we expect them to have our back. The Kurds were instrumental in our successful fight against ISIS in Syria. Leaving them to die is a big mistake."

And Brett McGurk, a former senior diplomat who was the special envoy for the U.S.-led anti-Islamic State coalition until he resigned in protest, labeled Trump "not a commander in chief." He accused Trump of making "impulsive decisions with no knowledge or deliberation," sending military personnel into harm's way with no backing and leaving "our allies exposed when adversaries call his bluff or he confronts a hard phone call."

Sunday's announcement followed a call between Trump and Erdogan, the White House said Sunday.

The decision is an illustration of Trump's focus on ending American overseas entanglements — one of his key campaign promises. His goals of swift withdrawals in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan have been stymied by concerns from U.S. officials and American allies about the dangerous voids that would remain.

As he faces the impeachment inquiry at home, Trump has appeared more focused on making good on his political pledges, even at the risk of sending a troubling signal to American allies abroad.

In December, Trump announced he would withdraw American troops from Syria but was met with widespread condemnation for abandoning Kurdish allies. That announcement prompted the resignations in protest of Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and McGurk, and an effort by then-national security adviser John Bolton to try to protect the Kurds.

Since January, U.S. officials have tried to broker the creation of a "safe zone" in northern Syria to provide a security buffer between the Turkish military and Kurdish forces, but Turkey has repeatedly objected to its slow implementation.

Turkey considers the People's Protection Units, or YPG, an extension of the Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK, which has waged an insurgency against Turkey for 35 years.

The Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces threatened to respond forcefully to any Turkish incursion.

A Kurdish official speaking on condition of anonymity said Monday the Kurds expected a limited Turkish operation and were still working to ascertain what will happen with American forces in the region.

The White House said Turkey will take custody of foreign fighters captured in the U.S.-led campaign against the Islamic State group who have been held by the Kurdish forces supported by the U.S.

The Kurds have custody of thousands of captured Islamic State militants. They include about 2,500 highly dangerous foreign fighters from Europe and elsewhere whose native countries have been reluctant to take them back and another 10,000 or so captured fighters from Syria and Iraq.

Trump has repeatedly demanded that European countries, particularly France and Germany, take back their citizens who joined the militant organization. He wrote Monday that it will now be up to countries in the region to decide what to do with captured fighters, and warned of retribution in response to any future attacks.

"We are 7,000 miles away and will crush ISIS again if they come anywhere near us!" he wrote.

IS was defeated in Iraq in 2017. In Syria it lost its last territory in March, marking the end of the extremists' self-declared caliphate. Despite these battlefield defeats, IS sleeper cells have continued to launch attacks in Iraq and Syria.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/trumps-syria-withdrawal-announcement-draws-gop-condemnation/ar-AAIp0Wm
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Offline No666

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58158 on: October 7, 2019, 05:58:28 PM »
I thought that was a not very amusing p*sstake. He's unhinged.

Offline Garrus

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Re: Ill Douche - Fungal Dick
« Reply #58159 on: October 7, 2019, 06:16:36 PM »
"But the Democrats made me vote for Trump".

On this board, in 2016. How'd you like it now?