Author Topic: Space exploration thread  (Read 154921 times)

Offline Tepid T₂O

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2040 on: June 8, 2018, 07:22:39 AM »
Life elsewhere in the universe eh?


This may be pretty good evidence of it..
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2041 on: June 8, 2018, 05:53:48 PM »
Tanya Harrison has done a good break down to counteract some of the more misleading headlines: https://medium.com/@tanyaofmars/the-curious-case-of-methane-on-mars-a06526b30d87

Absolutely amazing whatever it proves to be.
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2042 on: June 11, 2018, 12:16:57 AM »
Tanya Harrison has done a good break down to counteract some of the more misleading headlines: https://medium.com/@tanyaofmars/the-curious-case-of-methane-on-mars-a06526b30d87

Absolutely amazing whatever it proves to be.

That's a good article.  Flipping through wikipedia seems to suggest a couple of other possibilites for methane origin as well:

Quote
The principal candidates for the origin of Mars' methane include non-biological processes such as water–rock reactions, radiolysis of water, and pyrite formation, all of which produce H2 that could then generate methane and other hydrocarbons via Fischer–Tropsch synthesis with CO and CO2.[66] It has also been shown that methane could be produced by a process involving water, carbon dioxide, and the mineral olivine, which is known to be common on Mars.[67] The required conditions for this reaction (i.e. high temperature and pressure) do not exist on the surface, but may exist within the crust.[68][69] A detection of the mineral by-product serpentinite would suggest that this process is occurring. An analog on Earth suggests that low-temperature production and exhalation of methane from serpentinized rocks may be possible on Mars.[70] Another possible geophysical source could be ancient methane trapped in clathrate hydrates that may be released occasionally.[71] Under the assumption of a cold early Mars environment, a cryosphere could trap such methane as clathrates in stable form at depth, that might exhibit sporadic release.[72]

A group of Mexican scientists performed plasma experiments in a synthetic Mars atmosphere and found that bursts of methane can be produced when a discharge interacts with water ice. A potential source of the discharges can be the electrification of dust particles from sand storms and dust devils. The ice can be found in trenches or in the permafrost. The electrical discharge ionizes gaseous CO2 and water molecules and their byproducts recombine to produce methane. The results obtained show that pulsed electrical discharges over ice samples in a Martian atmosphere produce about 1.41×1016 molecules of methane per joule of applied energy.[73][74]

With the clathrate concept it doesn't give a mechanism for release; some form of geological activity would seem most likely but the emissions seem to be seasonal so this seems unlikely. 

The latter study seems to suggest methane release is possible without the need for liquid water but is there any device at Mars able to detect the electrical discharges required for it to happen?
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2043 on: June 14, 2018, 06:23:39 AM »
Wish Opportunity good luck! Fourteen years and counting... And I'm still counting. MER (Spirit and Opportunity) was so much better mission than MSL (Curiosity), which is better yet than Mars 2020 (just IMHO).

http://www.dw.com/en/massive-dust-storm-threatens-mars-rover-opportunity/a-44213514

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2044 on: July 23, 2018, 11:40:34 PM »
It never ceases to amaze me.

Just watched a wonderful 6 minute transit over the sky here in Devon, west to east, of the ISS and as a bonus, about three minutes after and on its trail what I assume was Cygnus.

A few other sat's also visible moving in the heavens, south to north, at a guess likely gps ones meandering around.

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2045 on: July 25, 2018, 08:14:08 PM »
Seems to be evidence for an underground lake (like 1.5km underground) on Mars. If the evidence from radar holds up, then it's possible it's not the only one. Remarkable to be at this point in exploring Mars, huge achievement by those who've contributed to the missions and the analysis. Fingers crossed.

National Geographic has a good summary of the story, with all the appropriate caveats.
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Offline John C

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2046 on: July 27, 2018, 10:55:40 PM »
Best moon ever since God was born and it's fucking cloudy here in Liverpool. fml.

Offline jillc

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2047 on: July 27, 2018, 11:03:07 PM »
Best moon ever since God was born and it's fucking cloudy here in Liverpool. fml.

There is supposed to be another one in January, let's hope the cloud has disappeared by then. It's so frustrating some wonderful images in the Guardian of it. 
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2048 on: July 27, 2018, 11:27:48 PM »
Best moon ever since God was born and it's fucking cloudy here in Liverpool. fml.

It's so annoying.

We've had beautiful clear skies every night for weeks on end down here in Devon and then today and tonight, cloudy.

I've been popping out at intervals all evening in vain hope and the Moon has finally just started to appear through breaks in the cloud but of course, it's now past eclipse time....





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Offline red1977

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2049 on: July 31, 2018, 10:29:13 PM »
Mars at its closest to Earth today since 2003: https://www.space.com/41329-mars-closest-to-earth-2018.html


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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2050 on: August 1, 2018, 04:16:27 AM »
Mars at its closest to Earth today since 2003: https://www.space.com/41329-mars-closest-to-earth-2018.html


Fuck, did I miss the boat?

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2051 on: August 1, 2018, 07:45:10 PM »
JAXA (the Japanese space agency) is currently in the middle of landing something on an asteroid again to try and get a sample to bring back to Earth. Hayabusa2 has a twitter feed in English which is pretty cool as it posts the pics as they come in.

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2052 on: August 31, 2018, 03:17:35 PM »
In other news, New Horizons has imaged it's next target, now being called Ultima Thule, still more than four months away from its Janary 1 2019 encounter.

Quote


Ultima in View

The figure on the left is a composite image produced by adding 48 different exposures from the News Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), each with an exposure time of 29.967 seconds, taken on Aug. 16, 2018. The predicted position of the Kuiper Belt object nicknamed Ultima Thule is at the center of the yellow box, and is indicated by the yellow crosshairs, just above and left of a nearby star that is approximately 17 times brighter than Ultima.

At right is a magnified view of the region in the yellow box, after subtraction of a background star field "template" taken by LORRI in September 2017 before it could detect the object itself. Ultima is clearly detected in this star-subtracted image and is very close to where scientists predicted, indicating to the team that New Horizons is being targeted in the right direction. The many artifacts in the star-subtracted image are caused either by small mis-registrations between the new LORRI images and the template, or by intrinsic brightness variations of the stars. At the time of these observations, Ultima Thule was 107 million miles (172 million kilometers) from the New Horizons spacecraft and 4 billion miles (6.5 billion kilometers) from the Sun.

Image credits: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

This is a very significant and positive development.  I don't think the team was expecting to image UT effectively until it was bare weeks away; but now not only is it where they were expecting it to be - so they've nailed the orbit spot on - but they can also start checking for potential hazards and refining the fly by details several months in advance of the actual encounter.
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2053 on: August 31, 2018, 07:11:38 PM »
Been following the Opportunity story on Mars via space force twitter.



NASA/JPL are giving it 45 days more of actively trying to contact the rover, which got covered by a huge dust storm, before switching to passive listening. Some of the former staff members/engineers etc. are a little grumpy with how short a time is being given, saying that continuing on to January would give a better chance of picking things back up.

Quote
The rover’s last communication with Earth was received June 10, and Opportunity’s current health is unknown. Opportunity engineers are relying on the expertise of Mars scientists analyzing data from the Mars Color Imager (MARCI) aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) to estimate the tau near the rover’s position.

“The dust haze produced by the Martian global dust storm of 2018 is one of the most extensive on record, but all indications are it is finally coming to a close,” said MRO Project Scientist Rich Zurek at JPL. “MARCI images of the Opportunity site have shown no active dust storms for some time within 3,000 kilometers [about 1,900 miles] of the rover site.”

With skies clearing, mission managers are hopeful the rover will attempt to call home, but they are also prepared for an extended period of silence. “If we do not hear back after 45 days, the team will be forced to conclude that the Sun-blocking dust and the Martian cold have conspired to cause some type of fault from which the rover will more than likely not recover,” said Callas. “At that point our active phase of reaching out to Opportunity will be at an end. However, in the unlikely chance that there is a large amount of dust sitting on the solar arrays that is blocking the Sun’s energy, we will continue passive listening efforts for several months.”

The additional several months for passive listening are an allowance for the possibility that a Red Planet dust devil could come along and literally dust off Opportunity’s solar arrays. Such “cleaning events” were first discovered by Mars rover teams in 2004 when, on several occasions, battery power levels aboard both Spirit and Opportunity increased by several percent during a single Martian night, when the logical expectation was that they would continue to decrease.

Wasn't Opportunity designed to last just 90 days? Fantastic tribute to the engineering skills which have seen it through more than 14 years.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2018, 07:13:09 PM by Zeb »
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2054 on: August 31, 2018, 09:39:32 PM »
It will be very sad to see Opportunity expire in such a manner.  Hope it bounces back.  I've literally being following it every since it landed. Has to easily be in the top five robotic space explorations.  It's unexpected longevity gave us a vital glance into the Martian surface.
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2055 on: August 31, 2018, 11:20:39 PM »
It will be very sad to see Opportunity expire in such a manner.  Hope it bounces back.  I've literally being following it every since it landed. Has to easily be in the top five robotic space explorations.  It's unexpected longevity gave us a vital glance into the Martian surface.
Never fully liked that project, to be honest. So many compromises went in different decisions, the management was disjointed; we are capable of so much better quality work. Goddard had no oversight and messed up the SAM instrument, it would have been 1000 times more sensitive per design... Driving became an event when the wheels started breaking, so the geologists declared victory before even reaching the mountain; we should have been up there on the rocky slopes by plan.

And if you think that's bad enough, the next rover (Mars 2020) is even worse... SHERLOC, PIXL, SuperCam, sample cahce tubes, all have issues that shouldn't exist in the first place. The schedule has already slipped almost to the max and we jokingly call it Mars 2022 now.
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2056 on: September 1, 2018, 04:41:44 PM »
Never fully liked that project, to be honest. So many compromises went in different decisions, the management was disjointed; we are capable of so much better quality work. Goddard had no oversight and messed up the SAM instrument, it would have been 1000 times more sensitive per design... Driving became an event when the wheels started breaking, so the geologists declared victory before even reaching the mountain; we should have been up there on the rocky slopes by plan.

And if you think that's bad enough, the next rover (Mars 2020) is even worse... SHERLOC, PIXL, SuperCam, sample cahce tubes, all have issues that shouldn't exist in the first place. The schedule has already slipped almost to the max and we jokingly call it Mars 2022 now.

I'm assuming you're talking about Curiosity there?  We were discussing Opportunity.
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2057 on: September 1, 2018, 04:55:59 PM »
I'm assuming you're talking about Curiosity there?  We were discussing Opportunity.
You're right, my bad... We still call them MER, MSL, etc.; those public names are not too popular here.
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2058 on: September 21, 2018, 03:57:58 PM »
https://www.sciencealert.com/star-trek-vulcan-exoplanet-40-eridani-a-hd-26965-super-earth-dharma-planet-survey

Quote
Astronomers Just Found a Planet Where Star Trek's Vulcan Was Predicted to Exist
It might even be habitable.

MICHELLE STARR 19 SEP 2018
So far, astronomers have identified thousands of exoplanets out there beyond the reaches of the Solar System, but only a rare few are the stuff of legend. Such is the case with an Earth-like exoplanet, found orbiting a star called 40 Eridani A - Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry's preferred location for Vulcan, the home planet of Mr Spock.

Located around 16 light-years from Earth in the southern constellation of Eridanus, 40 Eridani A is part of a triple-star system. Although it was never mentioned in the original TV series of Star Trek, it had been put forward as a proposed location for the planet by related literature.

In 1991, Roddenberry and three astronomers from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics wrote a letter to Sky & Telescope magazine laying out their choice for Vulcan's location, and why.

"Star Trek 2 by James Blish and Star Trek Maps by Jeff Maynard and others name the star 40 Eridani as Vulcan's sun. The Star Trek Spaceflight Chronology by Stan and Fred Goldstein cites Epsilon Eridani instead," they wrote in their letter.

"We prefer the identification of 40 Eridani as Vulcan's sun because of what we have learned about both stars at Mount Wilson … The HK observations suggest that 40 Eridani is 4 billion years old, about the same age as the Sun. In contrast, Epsilon Eridani is barely 1 billion years old.

"Based on the history of life on Earth, life on any planet around Epsilon Eridani would not have had time to evolve beyond the level of bacteria. On the other hand, an intelligent civilisation could have evolved over the aeons on a planet circling 40 Eridani. So the latter is the more likely Vulcan sun."

Epsilon Eridani does have one planet - an uninhabitable gas giant. Now astronomers on the University of Florida-led Dharma Planet Survey have found something that seems a bit more habitable orbiting 40 Eridani A.

More precisely, it's an object known as a super-Earth - a rocky planet around twice the size of Earth, orbiting 40 Eridani A just inside the system's habitable zone - not too hot and not too cold. It completes one orbit every 42 (Earth) days.

So life on the planet isn't unfeasible.

"The orange-tinted HD 26965 [40 Eridani A] is only slightly cooler and slightly less massive than our Sun, is approximately the same age as our Sun, and has a 10.1-year magnetic cycle nearly identical to the Sun's 11.6-year sunspot cycle," said astronomer Matthew Muterspaugh of Tennessee State University.

"Therefore HD 26965 may be an ideal host star for an advanced civilisation."

The aim of the Dharma Planet Survey, using the 50-inch Dharma Endowment Foundation Telescope (DEFT) on Mount Lemmon in Arizona, is a dedicated survey to find low-mass planets orbiting bright, nearby stars.

It uses the radial velocity method - detecting the very slight wobble in a star's position due to the gravitational pull of an exoplanet. The candidate exoplanet, named HD 26965b (but we'll probably call it Vulcan, obviously), is the first super-Earth found in the survey.

And if you're in the southern hemisphere, you can even go outside and look for it.

"This star can be seen with the naked eye, unlike the host stars of most of the known planets discovered to date," said astronomer Bo Ma of the University of Florida.

"Now anyone can see 40 Eridani on a clear night and be proud to point out Spock's home."


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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2059 on: September 22, 2018, 02:02:23 PM »
Jaxa have landed two rovers on asteroid Ryugu successfully. Picture from the English twitter feed taken by one of the rovers as it started its final descent onto the surface.





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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2060 on: September 28, 2018, 06:27:24 PM »
Just a bit more on those Japanese Landers.  These wont be the only ones.

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2061 on: October 8, 2018, 08:41:57 PM »
Hubble's lost full function of one of its gyros, meaning it's slipped into 'Safe Mode'.

https://www.space.com/42057-hubble-space-telescope-safe-mode-gyroscope-failure.html
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2062 on: October 8, 2018, 09:08:03 PM »
Ohhh


Still no JWST yet either..  this was always going to happen...

Still, it can still be used so it’s the end of the world
« Last Edit: October 8, 2018, 09:10:35 PM by Tepid T₂O »
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2063 on: October 8, 2018, 09:27:59 PM »
Ohhh


Still no JWST yet either..  this was always going to happen...

Still, it can still be used so it’s the end of the world
True, but JWST is now not schedued to fly until 2021 at the earliest, I'm wondering if the tech is going to be updated on board or will it already be somewhat redundant by the time it flies.

Schedule me a Soyuz to Hubble, I'll replace the gyros.  For free, I'm nice like that.
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2064 on: October 8, 2018, 10:19:26 PM »
True, but JWST is now not schedued to fly until 2021 at the earliest, I'm wondering if the tech is going to be updated on board or will it already be somewhat redundant by the time it flies.

Schedule me a Soyuz to Hubble, I'll replace the gyros.  For free, I'm nice like that.
Sounds like an horrific job to be honest..  just incredible that they didn’t it once already...

They’ve been talking about JWST since the 90s... it sees, so long ago it’s untrue..  I don’t thye they will upgrade anything.  It’s much too difficult due to the absurd amount of testing they have to do..

It’s been pushed back so many times though...
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2065 on: October 9, 2018, 06:28:12 AM »
JWST is has been a disaster... Fist pitched as $0.8bn project it gradually went up to $9bn. And the delays have been incomprehensible. Goddard given the mission was a NASA blunder, if you ask me. The worst (I fear) is yet to come. You can go fix Hubble, but good luck going to the L2 point to fix JWST should that be required.
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2066 on: October 9, 2018, 04:56:35 PM »
You'd think the lessons of Hubble would have been learned well. Of course not.
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2067 on: October 9, 2018, 10:01:40 PM »
Scott Manley talks about the HST failure

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2068 on: October 11, 2018, 10:26:29 AM »
Astronauts are to make an emergency landing after their Russian Soyuz rocket malfunctioned on lift-off to the International Space Station.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45822845

Looks like the crew are alive though search and rescue are on their way to find the capsule

Astronaut Nick Hague of NASA and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of the Russian space agency landed in a 'ballistic descent mode'

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2069 on: October 11, 2018, 10:27:46 AM »
Rogue NASA

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 24m24 minutes ago

FYI ballistic descent mode means that the crew could experience over 9 G's of force upon re-entry.

Search and rescue crews will take approx 1.5 hours to find the capsule (landing somewhere in Kazakhstan)

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2070 on: October 11, 2018, 10:29:39 AM »
The crew has landed and are in communication with rescue teams.

They are awaiting contact with search and rescue.

The crew is in good condition.

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2071 on: October 11, 2018, 03:30:10 PM »
Looks like they were found safe and well.

The Russian Space agency have suspended their future manned flights until after an investigation. They have promised to be transparent and dont expect any issues with their relationship with NASA

What could develop into an issue is if they cannot find the issue as there are still astronauts on the ISS and the Soyuz rockets are the only ones with the ability to take/return them. Supplies aren't thought to be an issue though as they can be sent in unmanned rockets

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2072 on: October 11, 2018, 07:38:25 PM »
Some footage and summary of the Soyuz situation.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/cpqq0i4w_fM" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/cpqq0i4w_fM</a>
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2073 on: October 13, 2018, 08:45:05 AM »
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2075 on: October 14, 2018, 10:48:38 AM »
Not directly involved in this thread - but saw "First Man" yesterday - the story of Neil Armstrong - actually more about him than the mission, but really brings into relief the risks and pure terror of what they overcame to reach the moon.
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2076 on: October 14, 2018, 03:17:02 PM »
I've often wondered why Obama decided to cancel the Constellation program, which had NASA shift over to SLS?  Seemed to me that the former was just starting to come together, what with the test launch and everything.  Now it looks like stopping one project and starting the other has set America's whole manned spaceflight program back years.

If it was a cost measure then it looks like a major blunder.  I think EM-1 was originally supposed to fly this year I think but it's been pushed way back to 2020.

How do big contractors mess up like this when you've got these aggressive, up and coming independent commercial operators just getting things done?  Just seems so bloated and inefficient in their approach...
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2077 on: October 14, 2018, 05:51:53 PM »
I've often wondered why Obama decided to cancel the Constellation program, which had NASA shift over to SLS?  Seemed to me that the former was just starting to come together, what with the test launch and everything.  Now it looks like stopping one project and starting the other has set America's whole manned spaceflight program back years.

If it was a cost measure then it looks like a major blunder.  I think EM-1 was originally supposed to fly this year I think but it's been pushed way back to 2020.

How do big contractors mess up like this when you've got these aggressive, up and coming independent commercial operators just getting things done?  Just seems so bloated and inefficient in their approach...

I think Elon Musk, Richard Branson and Jeff Bezos put paid to any government manned space program. Add to that the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster put safety back to the very top of the agenda which meant money which wasn't there after the market crash.

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2078 on: October 17, 2018, 05:03:57 AM »

Astronauts are to make an emergency landing after their Russian Soyuz rocket malfunctioned on lift-off to the International Space Station.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45822845

Looks like the crew are alive though search and rescue are on their way to find the capsule

Astronaut Nick Hague of NASA and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of the Russian space agency landed in a 'ballistic descent mode'

NASA Astronaut Describes What It Was Like to Fall to Earth When Soyuz Launch Failed
"One wild ride."


Last week, NASA astronaut Air Force Colonel Nick Hague faced death as he and his commander, Alexei Ovchinin, plummeted to Earth following an aborted Soyuz launch.

Outside, the world held its breath as the spacecraft returned in what NASA called a "ballistic descent mode". Inside the tiny capsule, according to Hague, things got pretty rough.


"We knew that if we wanted to be successful, we needed to stay calm and we needed to execute the procedures in front of us as smoothly and efficiently as we could," Hague told The Associated Press.

It's the kind of event pilots prepare for while hoping they never need to put it into practice.

Minutes after launch, following the jettisoning of side boosters, a second stage booster on Ovchinin and Hague's Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft system failed, leaving them no option but to abort the mission barely halfway to the edge of space.

Getting back down again was anything but a gentle ride, and there was no promise of success.

"Any time you're launching yourself into space and your booster has a problem when you're going 1,800 metres per second, things are pretty dynamic and they happen very fast," says Hague.

Most of us might turn into a blubbering mess. But two years of training in Russia kicked in for Hague, who not only stuck to emergency procedures during the half hour descent, but did so in a second language.


"All of my instincts and reflexes inside the capsule are to speak Russian," says Hague.

Both astronauts touched down safely on a plain in Kazakhstan without injuries, where they immediately called Mission Control, followed by their wives. Hague's call went to voicemail.

What do you say when you've just stared death in the face from nearly 50 kilometres (31 miles) above the surface?

"I told her, 'I'm fine and it was one wild ride,'" says Hague.

One wild ride is what most of us might call a Japanese roller coaster. This was something else.

Just as the team was seeing the horizon curve and the atmosphere fade to black, warning lights indicated a problem.

"I knew once I saw that light that we had an emergency with the booster, that at that point we weren't going to make it to orbit that day – so the mission changed to getting back down on the ground as safely as we could," says Hague.

With alarms blaring, the capsule was violently thrown clear from the booster. The steady acceleration towards space was swapped for a moment of weightlessness, followed by a build of force equal to nearly seven times Earth's gravity.


Finally the parachutes snapped into place with a bone-jarring crunch, slowing the descent enough to avoid a deadly collision with the ground.

It might not have been a leisurely float to safety, but the system was designed to be efficient, not pleasant.

Soyuz's safety mechanisms have been a part of the system for decades. And this is the first time they've been deployed.

"That's the system that saved our lives, and Alexey and I are standing because of that," says Hague.

"It's on every rocket, and for manned launches on the Soyuz, they haven't had to use that system for 35 years, but it's always been there. It's always been ready, and we proved that last week."

It's been 15 years since NASA lost the entire crew of the Columbia space shuttle soon after lift-off. Since then, their fatality record on space missions has fortunately been a clean one.

Hague doesn't attribute his fate to luck.

"The Soyuz is an engineering marvel," says Hague.

"That thing is reliable, and I'm just glad that there are so many people that have invested so many years of their life making that system as strong as it is."

https://www.sciencealert.com/nick-hague-describes-soyuz-aborted-mission

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2079 on: October 25, 2018, 08:31:02 PM »
Hubble is back in business.  They had a gyro in reserve.  It had been taken offline because it wasn't behaving correctly but they managed to wiggle it a bit and get it working properly, so it's being used to replace the gyro that failed. :)
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