Author Topic: #SHANKLY100 Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse  (Read 16578 times)

Offline Phil M

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#SHANKLY100 Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« on: February 18, 2010, 11:01:06 PM »

In 1970 Bill Shankly had to make some tough decisions, the team that had won two leagues, an FA Cup and reached
the final of the Cup Winners Cup was an ageing one and has been knocked out of the FA Cup by lowly Watford in the quarter finals. He decided, as ever, with the best interests of the future of LFC in mind to look for fresh young talent to take the club forward and build with and also to move some of the older players on.



Barrow born, Emlyn Hughes, just 23 at the time, had made his debut three seasons earlier in the spring of '67 after signing for a sum of £65,000 from Blackpool after making just 28 appearances for them. Emlyn survived the cull by Shanks along with the likes of Ian Callaghan and Tommy Smith.









As the story goes the prophetic Shanks was stopped in his car by the coppers as he drove his new signing back to Merseyside for the first time and said: "Don't you know who I've got in this car? The captain of England!" The policeman leaned in for a closer look and says ''Well I don't recognise him" to which Shankly retorted: "No son, but you will!"

Emlyn himself recalls the yarn here...

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/bMO9I-pTtM8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/bMO9I-pTtM8</a>

Emlyn soon settled into life at Anfield in what was a transitional time for the club. He gained his nickname 'Crazy Horse'
after less than a handful of games after he rugby-tackled Newcastle's forward Albert Bennett who was slipping through his grasp in just his fifth game for Liverpool. He had truly endeared himself to the Kop forever more.

Emlyn played in his preferred midfield role but Shanks later moved him to centre-half alongside
Phil Thompson who had coincidentally also been brought back from a midfield position. They almost immediately struck up a fantastic partnership, Thommo's first class distribution and ability to read the game was complimented by Hughes who although predominantly left sided was strong with both feet and also dominant in the air and despite his eagerness in the tackle which earned him his nickname he soon matured into almost the complete player. Shanks obviously saw something special for he rewarded Emlyn with the captain's armband, he had succeeded Tommy Smith, a move which infamously ignited a long running feud between the pair. Liverpool became renowned for their more continental style, maintaining posession and building attacks from the back with controlled passing.

Emlyn had yet to taste success however. In 1971 when we reached the cup final he was inconsolable when
we lost 1-2 in extra time to Arsenal. Legendary commentator Kenneth Wolstenholme remarked: "Emlyn Hughes there, really absolutely sick."



However it wouldn't be long before the future club captain would be on the winning side with a trophy to show for it.
The 1972/73 season was a history making one for the Reds and Crazy Horse was at the epicentre. He played an incredible 65 games that season which culminated in an unprecendented league and Uefa Cup double. And leading his side to league glory ahead of Arsenal must have felt all the sweeter. The merseyside derby of '73 was an unforgettable one for Emlyn who scored both goals in a memorable win at Goodison.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/E68XKOF9nfA&amp;feature=related" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/E68XKOF9nfA&amp;feature=related</a>
Later after the FA Cup semi-final replay in 1977, where Liverpool had won 3-0, Emlyn came out with what was to become a legendary quote “Liverpool are magic, Everton are tragic.”

1973, we dispatched Tottenham on away goals after a 2-2 aggregate draw in the semi-finals before meeting
Borussia Moenchengladbach, we famously won the first leg 3-0 but the travelling Kopites had to bite their nails
to the ends in the second leg when we held out to win the cup when Borussia put up a great display winning 2-0
but succumbing 3-2 on aggregate.
Liverpool's first Uefa Cup Trophy: (keep an eye out for Emlyn in the build up to the second)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/iuKU5_P7u-k" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/iuKU5_P7u-k</a>
 
1974 saw Emlyn climb the famous Wembley steps to lift the FA Cup as captain for the first time. This was our second FA Cup triumph and didn't we do it in style. We met the might of Newcastle United in the final....


 
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/zR0Y6-Pm6aU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/zR0Y6-Pm6aU</a>
 
Shanks embraces his skipper:





Unfortunately the Redmen had to settle for the runners up spot in the following couple of seasons when we lost out narrowly to Don Revie's Leeds United and in 74/75 to Derby County. Shanks bowed out but luckily Liverpool were able to count on Sir Bob Paisley to take up the reigns and almost seamlessly the 1975/76 season saw Liverpool back on top domestically. With just 5 defeats Liverpool were nigh on unstoppable as we held off the challenge of QPR to bring the title back where it belonged. This was to be another unforgettable season as we recorded another incredible league and Uefa Cup double. The title was successfully defended in 76/77 when we won our record setting tenth league title.


 
One of the most memorable games ever played at Anfield, the 1976 Uefa Cup Final first leg v Club Brugges.
A crowd of over 50,000 packed into Anfield on the night of the 28th of April 1976.
Here's what unfolded....
 
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/fwRf-n36DAs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/fwRf-n36DAs</a>

In the return leg Brugge went ahead with an 11th minute penalty only for Keegan to once again come
good and score our equaliser four minutes later, the game ended 1-1 and Liverpool had won the Cup again,
4-3 on aggregate. And here's the footage....

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/CxyG_oRloUU&amp;feature=related" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/CxyG_oRloUU&amp;feature=related</a>
 
A beaming Emlyn and his crew displaying their achievements from the
brilliantly successful 1975/76 season.



Those were the days my friend...

Doubles had almost become the norm around the fields of Anfield Road and in 1976/77 season one of the greatest Reds sides led by Emlyn was on course for an unprecedented treble of league, FA Cup and European Cup. Old Big Ears had eluded the Reds and indeed British sides in general up to that point, Leeds had reached the final in '75 when they lost to Bayern but it had been a long time since a British side had succeeded on Europe's biggest stage.
With Sir Bob at the helm however and the league title successfully defended this was about to change as Liverpool headed for Rome to contest the European Cup Final v
Borussia Mönchengladbach.  The FA Cup was also up for grabs, Just four days earlier Manchester United somehow managed to cruelly rob us of our treble dreams by inflicting a 1-2 Wembley defeat in the FA Cup. Emlyn was as distraught as he was in '71 but there were bigger wars to be won.
 
It was no easy ride to Rome in '77 however, in the quarter-finals we faced St.Etienne who were finalists in 1976. After a demoralising 1-0 defeat in France. A big effort would be required if we were to overcome this talented outfit at home.

One of the greatest nights the Kop ever witnessed....

The rest as they say is history.....”WE SHALL NOT BE MOVED!”

 <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/pY6ybFJg0_U&amp;feature=related" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/pY6ybFJg0_U&amp;feature=related</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ppavK4P7RhY&amp;feature=related" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ppavK4P7RhY&amp;feature=related</a>

After hammering Zurich 6-1 on aggregate and with the title wrapped up Emlyn confidently led
the Reds out at the Stadio Olimpico to a rapturous reception where the fans had almost literally painted the town Red.




<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/WGYoTYAOSwY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/WGYoTYAOSwY</a>






1977 also saw Emlyn rightfully crowned Football Writers Player of the year, this was a personal achievement, that Emlyn was honored to receive. It was a great end to one of his best seasons at Liverpool.


Emlyn sings 'Liverpool are magic, Everton are tragic' at the homecoming parade at St. George's plateau in 1977 while Phil Thompson, David Johnson and Jimmy Case crack up.....


Liverpool were denied a league three in a row by Brian Clough's great Nottingham Forest side
and Emlyn had to settle for a runners up medal.
We started the season by winning yet another European trophy, the first Super Cup which we lifted after hammering Hamburg 6-0 at home (7-1 on aggregate.) Defending the European Cup would be no easy feat but with the final being held at Liverpool's second home Wembley it was a further incentive for Bob's men. Dynamo Dresden and Borussia Mönchengladbach were dispatched and our old friends Brugges lay in wait on the 10th of May 1978.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/aX-FwEfUGFY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/aX-FwEfUGFY</a>






Emlyn's final squad picture ahead of the 1978/79 season:



At this stage in his LFC career, Emlyn's place came under pressure from the rapidly emerging young Scottish centre half
named Alan Hansen. But 16 appearances meant that Emlyn's final season at Anfield was another successful one as we lifted our 11th league title exacting revenge over the Nottingham Forest side who had beaten us in the League Cup final of '78.  At the end of the season after an illustrious Anfield career Bob felt it was time for Crazy Horse to move on.
Emlyn was sold to Wolves for a fee of £90,000 in August 1979.He made his Wolves debut at the Baseball Ground on Wednesday, 22 August 1979 in a 1-0 win over Derby County and went on to win the League Cup in his first season with Wolves - the only trophy he didn't win with Liverpool - and duly lifted it as captain after a surprise 1-0 win over Nottingham Forest at Wembley. He was later decorated with the OBE for services to football and featured on the television tribute show This Is Your Life.


Emlyn is the only Liverpool player to have lifted the European Cup as captain twice.
England:


Emlyn won the first of his 62 England caps against Holland in 1969 – and went on to captain his country 23 times
and was a non-playing part of the 1970 World Cup squad.

Funny clip of Emlyn from A Question Of Sport...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/question_of_sport/7720831.stm

'Come all without
Come all within
You ain't seen nothing like the Mighty Emlyn'


Emlyn Hughes Liverpool Stats
Appearances: 657
Goals: 48 goals

Honours with LFC:

* 4 Division 1 championship Winners medals (1973, 1976, 1977 and 1979)
* FA Cup winners medal (1974)
* 2 European Cup winners medals (1977 and 1978)
* 2 UEFA Cup winners medals (1973 and 1976)
* European Super Cup winners medal (1977)
* 3 Charity Shield winners medals (1974, 1976 and 1977)
* 3 First Division (Level 1) runners-up medals (1969, 1974 and 1978)
* 2 FA Cup runners-up medals (1971 and 1977)
* Football League Cup runners-up medal (1978)
* European Super Cup runners-up medal (1978)
* Charity Shield runners-up medal (1971)

* Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C (1979–1981) - 58 appearances, 2 goals
* Football League Cup winners medal (1980)
* England (1969–1980) - 62 caps, 1 goal
* Personal Honours
* Awarded the OBE in (1980)
* Football Writers Footballer of the Year (1977)

Football Writers Player of the Year: 1977
League appearances: Hughes 474
League goals: Hughes 35
Total appearances: Hughes 657
Total goals: Hughes 48

I end with a very fitting youtube tribute to our legendary former captain.
Emlyn you will never walk alone.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/mU9-3gv0K84" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/mU9-3gv0K84</a>

Emlyn's statue in his hometown of Barrow:

Emlyn Hughes 1947-2004




Other Rawk material on Emlyn:

http://www.redandwhitekop.com/forum/index.php/topic,43771.0.html
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 01:51:02 PM by The 92A »
It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

Offline Rococo

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2010, 11:20:48 PM »
Thanks for posting that, quality read about a player about whom I don't know as much as I should.

Offline stockdam

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2010, 11:32:01 PM »
I had the pleasure of watching Emlyn. A truly great and inspirational player. He always gave 100%.

Legend.
#JFT96

Offline StevenLFC

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2010, 11:38:11 PM »
A great piece worthy of a great man.

Offline MidwestWool

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2010, 11:39:21 PM »
Cracking post, Phil. Stopped doing my homework to read this and I'm glad I did. I learnt a lot more about a legend of our's. Like Shanks, he embraced the culture of the city and the people. And it's difficult to describe just how good he was for us.

Didn't they say that he had a smile "as wide as the Mersey"?

R.I.P. Crazy Horse

Offline SalisburyRed

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2010, 11:44:48 PM »
That's a great read. Thank you very much for posting that.

Offline Phil M

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2010, 11:47:02 PM »
I had the pleasure of watching Emlyn. A truly great and inspirational player. He always gave 100%.

Legend.

I envy you mate, he was before my time but what a player and person he was. I imagine he was the epitomy of
a captain in Shanks eyes. Oh and thanks for the comments folks, really appreciated.
It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

Offline paisley1977

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2010, 11:53:00 PM »
Had a few,probally more than normal and just read that post and it really brings home what a great player and Captain Emlyn was.And how lucky i've been to have witnessed the time he was at our club.It brings a tear to the eye to remember how good we were great post.

I've been here during the bad times,we finished second once.

Offline Paranoid Red

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2010, 11:55:31 PM »
A great read. Many many thanks.

Offline electricghost

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2010, 12:08:17 AM »
Super stuff again Phil, thanks for going to the trouble of putting all of that together. Sadly my memories of him only extend to A Question of Sport.
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Offline gomez

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2010, 12:16:12 AM »
Fantastic post, enjoyed reading that. Emlyn is my favorite player ever and that tribute was superb.

Thanks for taking the time to construct that Phil, loved it mate.

Offline rednich85

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2010, 12:17:19 AM »
Brilliant that.

Pleasure reading it Phil

Thanks!
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Offline ALPH1217

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2010, 12:20:31 AM »
Great work, Phil. Emlyn was special.

Offline Mutton Geoff

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2010, 12:21:14 AM »
great work Phil a fitting tribute for the man i regard as the greatest Liverpool player of the last fifty years, yes even ahead of Kenny and miles ahead of Stevie!
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Offline southern scouse

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2010, 12:28:18 AM »
A great player and captain with a fantastic character, epitomised everything Shanks and Pailsey stood for with LFC.

That 75/76 photo I think started a little game when we won everyting in sight in the glory years, so many trophies you could play spot the ball and still kin miss it ha, those were the days indeed

Brilliant read and sadly missed.

R.I.P. Crazy Horse, the mighty Emlyn

Offline Shankly!Shankly!

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2010, 12:33:49 AM »
beauty of a post. thanks you very much. time definately spent well.
are there any other vidoes of him on question of sport?
'At a football club, there's a holy trinity - the players, the manager and the supporters. Directors don't come into it. They are only there to sign the cheques.'

Offline kevinbrodie

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2010, 12:59:11 AM »
excellent post. i'm old enough to have watched him. Spent a few minutes with him in the town center before Heysel as well. He was quality with the supporters.
Rafa is my Shankly

Offline Phil M

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2010, 01:02:45 AM »
beauty of a post. thanks you very much. time definately spent well.
are there any other vidoes of him on question of sport?

Will look for some mate but in the meantime have a listen to this.....
(sorry can't do anything about that bitch on the front ;) )

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/bMO9I-pTtM8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/bMO9I-pTtM8</a>

Just realised he's telling the yarn I mentioned about Shanks & the copper, great stuff.   :D

« Last Edit: February 19, 2010, 01:10:14 AM by Phil M »
It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2010, 01:03:24 AM »
Thanks for posting, brilliant.

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2010, 01:09:08 AM »
Excellent piece Phil, thanks for that mate..
"If you can't support us when we lose or draw, don't support us when we win"

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Rest in peace Ray Osborne/shanklyboy

Offline shanklyboy

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #20 on: February 19, 2010, 02:30:54 AM »
Great read that Phil....I really enjoyed that.
Thought  some of you lads might enjoy this.
You can't get enough of this lad........Oh to have him now!


shanklyboy

Emyln Hughes

                                                             

I’m going to stick my neck out here and ask you not to watch the video at the end before you read this. Then you will understand what I am waffling on about.
                                     
No you are not mistaken, this is the section for centre-backs.
‘Crazy Horse‘…‘Emmer‘….‘Yozzer‘….‘Emlyn’. He almost had a nickname for each position he could play.
Centre-back, left back, centre midfield , right and left midfield.He could play them all like he was born for the position. Excellent in the air and as two footed as they come.
For those too young to have seen Emlyn play. Think of him as a latter day Steven Gerrard.
Some players suffer for their versatility, not Emlyn. In his case it was an asset. You would always find a place for ‘Yozzer’ in your side.

                                                   

Wherever and whenever Emlyn Hughes played his enthusiasm and will to win shone through like a beacon. Shankly saw many of his own qualities in the gangly kid who he predicted  was ‘A future captain of England’.
That was one of the main reasons Shankly signed the 19 year old from Blackpool for £65,000 in 1967. Even though  the Barrow born youngster had played only 29 games for The Tangerines.
The prediction did come true as Emlyn went on to be Liverpool’s most capped player and England capt.

                                                                                   


When I was jotting down my memories of Emlyn to do this, I was surprised by the fact that he made his debut for the Reds the year after I started going to the game. It surprised me because one of my earliest memories of going to the game was wearing a rosette nearly as big as my head which had a picture of Emlyn on it. Maybe it just seemed that he’d been there for ever.
It was my sisters rosette who was in love with Emlyn. Her love affair has never died. The rosette did however….ripped off in the sway of The Kop. She still has the replacement which unless she reads this  she wasn’t aware of. This is in fact the picture…..


                                                                       

When Shank’s started his re-building job at Liverpool , Hughes was at the heart of his thoughts. His incredible durability and versatility must have saved the club a fortune as he covered in many positions as Shanks tried to find the right players and the right blend to make the club a force again.

It’s worth remembering that Emlyn came into a side that although it was ageing, it contained many players that will go down in Liverpool fokelore. However trophies were very thin on the ground. As we hadn’t won the League for 2 years and expectations at Liverpool had become increasingly high.
Although Emlyn was a key member of the F.A Cup Final team of 1971 it would take until 1973 for another major trophy to find it’s way into the Anfield trophy cabinet.

                                                                             


It was the start of a period where Emlyn was involved in all of Liverpool’s glory for almost a decade. A period which saw the club establish itself  as the epitome of Shankly’s vision of a ‘Bastion of Invincibility’. It’s no exaggeration to say that Emlyn was at the centre of that revolution.

It’s an indication of Emlyns ability and the faith Shankly bestowed upon him when he was paired with Phil Thompson as our main centre-backs. Neither were the tallest but Shankly wanted a more European ball playing partnership that could also compete in the physical quagmire that was the English League. Emlyn was comfortable in any arena.


                                                                           



Emlyn’s place in our history was guaranteed even before he became not only the first Liverpool player to lift The European Cup but the first British player ever to lift it twice.
He went through his entire 12 years at Anfield without ever being asked to play in a reserve game.
Emlyn’s physique made him one of the toughest defenders to play against. It also protected him from the injuries his position attracted, allowing him to miss just three games in his first nine years at Anfield.



                                                                         


Some years back a gang of Reds were talking about different players and Emlyn came up. A mate of mine told how in a European game we were being taken apart down our right hand side by some tricky, speedy winger. The mists of time cloud out who he or the opposition were, but it could have been Eintracht Frankfurt. My mate was in the paddock and Emlyn was playing  as a left sided centre back. He’d had enough of this player and once he’d broken through again, Emlyn came right across the field and tackled the player by the paddock. My mate said it was the hardest tackle he’d ever seen. He said that grown men whinced as  Emlyn hit him. He won the ball cleanly, but hit him so hard you could hear the crunch of bone on muscle and all the air coming out of the players body, not only when he got hit, but when he also hit the paddock wall. He never bothered us after that.


                                                                   

So don’t for one minute think Emlyn was just some jovial, all smiling nice feller. He was ferocious when he needed to be. This was a player who would have died for the club and played every game as though his own life depended on it.
The biggest compliment I can pay him is that he had 2 things in common with Dalglish.
Just say his first name to any red and they will know who you mean then look at the joy on his face when he scored.


                                                                                     
 
                                                                                                  EMLYN HUGHES

                                                                                                                  Born:                  Barrow, 28.8.47
                                                                                                                  Died:                  Sheffield, 9.11.04
                                                                                                                  Signed:               Feb 1967
                                                                                                                  Transfer Fee:           £65,000
                                                                                                                  Games:                        657
                                                                                                                  Goals:                           48
                                                                             
                                                                                                                                       Honours:
                                                                                                                          European Cup 76/77, 77/78
                                                                                                                             UEFA Cup 72/73, 75/76
                                                                                                       League Championship 72/73, 75/76, 76/77, 78/79
                                                                                                                                     FA Cup 73/74
                                                                                                       The football writer's "Player of the Year " award 77
                                                                                                                         England Caps 62 (1 goal)

                                                                     <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/mU9-3gv0K84" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/mU9-3gv0K84</a>

After the comments at the end of the video by Shankly I could have just left it there but I wanted to try and do justice to the man.
Emlyn Hughes did have it all.
I don't mind admitting that I look at that video with a tear in my eye and a shiver down my spine.
God Bless you Emlyn lad.


                                                                                             

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Offline KopThat

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #21 on: February 19, 2010, 02:42:47 AM »
A true legend of the game, always loved to watch him play, and can't wait for those sort of glory days to return to Anfield.

Excellent work Phil, I really enjoyed the trip down amnesia lane

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #22 on: February 19, 2010, 02:55:45 AM »
Great read that Phil....I really enjoyed that.
Thought  some of you lads might enjoy this.
You can't get enough of this lad........Oh to have him now!


I never actually browsed that thread Shanks apologies if it seems like I plagiarised it.
I had intentions of doing something more compact like yours but once I started I had to keep going,
thanks for posting it mate.
It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #23 on: February 19, 2010, 02:55:47 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/3HxjgKbZkfE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/3HxjgKbZkfE</a>
If you never saw him play then this clip tells you everything you ever wanted to know about Emlyn Hughes.
It was one of the best goals I've ever seen live. It was against Southampton and a week before the 1971 Cup Final.
(I posted it on youtube recently after a request from Dr Beaker, who was also there and remembers it with great affection).
Intercepts in his own box and ten seconds later is at the other end to whack it into the net.
And as for that "smile as wide as the Mersey Tunnel...."

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #24 on: February 19, 2010, 02:56:44 AM »
If you never saw him play then this clip tells you everything you ever wanted to know about Emlyn Hughes.

I was hoping someone would have some more clips, that's brilliant mate cheers.
It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #25 on: February 19, 2010, 03:01:47 AM »
I never actually browsed that thread Shanks apologies if it seems like I plagiarised it.
I had intentions of doing something more compact like yours but once I started I had to keep going,
thanks for posting it mate.


No problem mate, I can tell you did it from the heart.
I know what you mean about not being able to stop typing........I had the same problem.
Fortunately...or unfortunately Sarge would have battered me if I'd have done my usual 68 page 'summary'.
The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie — deliberate, contrived and dishonest — but the myth — persistent, persuasive and unrealistic.

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2010, 03:06:02 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/3HxjgKbZkfE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/3HxjgKbZkfE</a>
If you never saw him play then this clip tells you everything you ever wanted to know about Emlyn Hughes.
It was one of the best goals I've ever seen live. It was against Southampton and a week before the 1971 Cup Final.
(I posted it on youtube recently after a request from Dr Beaker, who was also there and remembers it with great affection).
Intercepts in his own box and ten seconds later is at the other end to whack it into the net.
And as for that "smile as wide as the Mersey Tunnel...."

I love that goal mate....sums him up.
Did you clock the defender just after Emlyn turns away....throwing his hands down as though to say " Ahhhhh fucking hell...it's not fair this"
The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie — deliberate, contrived and dishonest — but the myth — persistent, persuasive and unrealistic.

John F. Kennedy.
www.savelfc.org

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #27 on: February 19, 2010, 03:13:20 AM »
Brilliant post Phil.  :wellin

You too shanklyboy.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2010, 03:15:45 AM by Freezing Cold »
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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #28 on: February 19, 2010, 03:13:35 AM »
Absolutely fantastic post, an hour very well spent. Miss that man so much.
Anyone got a link to the question of sport bit with princess anne, so funny!!
Mamadou Sakho...

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #29 on: February 19, 2010, 03:19:43 AM »
Quote

 Obituary: Emlyn Hughes
By John May

Emlyn Hughes will be remembered as somebody who did everything to the maximum.

Whether it was as a swashbuckling footballer whose style earned him the nickname Crazy Horse, or as a television quiz show captain who rubbed shoulders with royalty, Emlyn Hughes never did things by half.

He made his name at Liverpool, making 665 appearances between 1967 and 1979, and helping establish the club as the top team in Europe, leading the side to its first European Cup.

He went on to win 62 England caps and was awarded the OBE for services to football before he left the sport for his second career, in television.

Emlyn Hughes was born in Barrow in August 1947, into a sporting family.

His father Fred played rugby league for Great Britain, as did his uncle and brother, while one of his aunts was a hockey international.

He signed for Blackpool as a teenager, but his all-action style soon brought him to the attention of Liverpool boss Bill Shankly.

The astute Shankly saw enough in Hughes to splash out the then huge sum of £65,000 for a 19-year-old who had made just 29 appearances for the Tangerines, describing him as "a future England captain".

Hughes was an archetypal Shankly player, matching skill with boundless reserves of drive, enthusiasm and battling qualities.

EMLYN HUGHES' HONOURS
# 2 European Cups
# 2 Uefa Cups
# 4 League Championships
# 1 FA Cup
# 1 League Cup
# 1 European Super Cup

The versatile Hughes could slot in anywhere along the back line, or take his combative, all-action style into midfield.

Wherever he played, Hughes' performances were characterised by powerful, surging runs which earned him his nickname.

Having built his team around Hughes, Shankly handed the legacy on to successors Bob Paisley and Joe Fagan.

Hughes was the body and spirit of the all-conquering Liverpool side of the mid to late 1970s, and his reputation grew as his and Liverpool's trophy cabinets bulged.

He replaced Tommy Smith as skipper in 1973 and moved from full-back to the centre of defence to partner Phil Thompson.

Four years later, he became the first Liverpool captain to get his hands on the European Cup when he lifted the trophy in Rome after the 3-1 win over Borussia Moenchengladbach.

He took possession of the trophy again a year later following the 1-0 win over Bruges at Wembley, and he also led Liverpool to the European Super Cup.

Hughes was also able to boast five League Championship medals, two Uefa Cup winnners medals, and an FA Cup winner's gong.

Inevitably, the qualities that made him a success at Liverpool were coveted by a similarly driven man, England boss Sir Alf Ramsay.

Hughes won the first of his 62 England caps against Holland in 1969 - going on to captain his country 23 times - but his career co-incided with one of the leanest spells in the international side's fortunes and he never appeared in a World Cup.

After making 665 first-team appearances for Liverpool, Hughes extended his career when he joined Wolves in 1979 for £79,000.

Hughes' leadership qualities were still intact, and he led Wolves to a League Cup triumph in 1980, filling the gap in his trophy cabinet with the only domestic honour he had never captured at Liverpool.

INTERNATIONAL HONOURS
# 62 England Caps
# Captained England 23 times
# 1st cap v Holland 1969

He was awarded an OBE in 1980 for his services to football and after his playing days ended following spells at Hull, Mansfield and Swansea, he tried his hand at management.

Like many great players, he was unable to transfer his success to the board room, and he lasted 20 months as manager of Rotherham United.

After his dabble with management, he carved out a career for himself in the media, where his face became known to non-football fans as the cheeky, long-serving captain on BBC TV's A Question of Sport, appearing opposite fellow skipper, rugby star Bill Beaumont, from 1984 to 1987.

Hughes' wide grin and infectious laugh became one of the show's trademarks and he propelled the show into national notoriety when he put his arm round the shoulder of team member Princess Anne when she appeared on the show.

It was typical of Hughes, who would not let protocol be a barrier to what he percieved to be an act of team bonding.

After leaving A Question of Sport, Hughes continued to be one of the most eagerly sought after-dinner speakers, and was also in demand as a motivational speaker.

He was diagnosed with brain cancer in August 2003 and underwent surgery during his 15-month fight against the disease.
Story from BBC SPORT:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/sport2/hi/football/3438023.stm

Published: 2004/11/09 11:19:50 GMT

© BBC MMX







Quote


Emlyn Hughes
Emlyn Hughes, who died yesterday aged 57, was the captain of Liverpool as it became the dominant force of the 1970s in both English and European football.
 

Published: 12:03AM GMT 10 Nov 2004
Emlyn Hughes
Liverpool captain Emlyn Hughes doffs his red top hat in celebration after his team's victory in the European Cup - Final - Liverpool v Borussia Monchengladbach Photo: EMPICS Sports Photo Agency

Hughes was signed by the club's inspirational manager Bill Shankly as a teenager in February 1967 for £65,000, a record fee for a full-back. He had then played fewer than 30 professional matches for his club, Blackpool, but Shankly had seen in him much of his own childlike enthusiasm for the game, as well as Hughes's innate stamina and drive.

In later years Hughes - who was not known for his modesty - liked to tell the story of how Shankly had pranged his car in his haste to driNve Hughes over from Blackpool to Lytham St Anne's to register him with the FA. As a constable began to take down Shankly's details, the increasingly irate Scotsman asked the officer if he did not know who was in the vehicle. "No - not me!" he went on, pointing at Hughes. "The future captain of England!"
 

Although Shankly's prediction was to be fulfilled, in his first few outings for his new team Hughes demonstrated that as yet his energy far outweighed his skill. His wild charges upfield, taken together with several tackles that more closely resembled illegal throws in Cumberland wrestling, brought him the nickname "Crazy Horse".

Yet he quickly settled down, and once more proved that Shankly had a genius for spotting unknown players - among them Kevin Keegan and Ray Clemence - whom he could groom to replace the likes of Ian St John, Ron Yeats and Roger Hunt, who had first made the club's modern reputation in the mid-1960s.

Hughes started as a left-sided defender, but soon moved to the centre, where he would forge successive partnerships with Larry Lloyd, Tommy Smith and then Phil Thompson. For all his coltish dynamism (never better exemplified than by his post-goal celebrations, in which he would frequently run the length of the pitch, frenetically windmilling his arms), Hughes was also a level-headed reader of the game, with a sound touch and good passing range.

This brought him into his own in the early 1970s, when Shankly decided that if Liverpool were to prosper in Europe they must dispense with the traditional type of English centre-half, to whom the ball was an unwelcome stranger, and build their attacks from the back. It was the team's subsequent ability to blend British aggression and workrate with a Continental style of movement that made them nigh-irresistible for the next 15 years.

Having missed the 1971 FA Cup Final defeat by Arsenal, Hughes's first trophies with Liverpool came two seasons later, when they took both the league title and the Uefa Cup, beating Borussia Moenchengladbach 3-2 on aggregate. The next year, following a row with Tommy Smith, Shankly made Hughes club captain in his place.

The change led to a long-running feud between Smith and Hughes that continued in print for decades after both had retired from the game, and led to tension in the dressing room, where the older players remained loyal to Smith and voiced their dislike of Hughes's chattiness (and parsimony in the pub).

Following Liverpool's 3-0 victory over Newcastle in the 1974 FA Cup Final, several players pushed Smith to the front of the celebrations, ahead of Hughes, but after Shankly's unexpected retirement in the close season Hughes was confirmed in the post by his successor, Bob Paisley.

Hughes never had the same personal bond with Paisley as he had had with Shankly, but on the pitch he became the driving force for the side, his passion for the club and enjoyment of football evident in every game - a characteristic that made him a great favourite with the fans.

With Hughes now frequently playing in central midfield, Liverpool embarked on their great run of triumphs by winning another double of the league and Uefa Cup (this time defeating Bruges) in 1976, and then in 1977 coming close to a treble triumph. They retained the championship, lost the FA Cup Final 2-1 to Manchester United, then four days later - in their 61st game of the season - comprehensively outplayed Borussia again in Rome to claim their first European Cup. Hughes, newly voted the Football Writers' Footballer of the Year, lifted the trophy with what the commentator Barry Davies called "the smile of the season".

That match was the last for Liverpool for both Smith and Keegan, and signalled the arrival of the player who was to take the team to still greater heights, Kenny Dalglish. Liverpool's triumph in Rome was to be the first of six consecutive victories for English clubs in the competition, a sequence that continued when Dalglish scored the winner in the European Cup Final against Bruges the next year. In 1979 Liverpool again won the league championship, this time with a record number of points won and fewest goals conceded (a mere 16 in 42 matches).

Hughes's achievements at Anfield had not gone unnoticed by England managers. He won his first international cap against Holland at left back in 1969, and was a squad member during the 1970 World Cup in Mexico. Defeat there to West Germany, however, initiated a bleak era for English football, and though Hughes went on to win 62 caps, the last in 1980, the team failed to qualify for both the 1974 and 1978 tournaments. It cannot have helped that Hughes, who largely shared the captaincy with Keegan in the mid- and late-1970s, did so under four different managers. He led the team 23 times, then the most by any captain bar Billy Wright or Bobby Moore.

After his fourth championship win with Liverpool, in July 1979 Hughes, then rising 32, moved to Wolves. He had played 665 matches for Liverpool and, having a fine shot from distance, had scored 48 goals for them. In his first season with Wolves, as captain, he won the League Cup when his side defeated Nottingham Forest 1-0 with a goal from Andy Gray. In claiming his medal, Hughes thereby completed his remarkable and well-merited sweep of all the game's principal domestic and European club honours.

Emlyn Walter Hughes was born at Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, on August 28 1947. He came from a family that had close ties to rugby league, which his father had played as a forward for both Barrow and Great Britain. Young Emlyn soon showed his own abilities on the soccer field and represented North Lancashire Schools before signing for Blackpool, then struggling in Division One, in 1964.

Hughes moved on from Wolves to Rotherham as player-manager in 1981. Management, however, was not to be for him, and after he left the club in 1983 he had brief spells as a player at Hull, Mansfield and John Toshack's Swansea before retiring in 1984.

By then he had become a television personality, notably through his appearances on the long-running BBC quiz A Question of Sport. For most of the 1980s, Hughes - an open, voluble, tactile man with a somewhat high-pitched voice and dubious taste in knitwear - captained one team, presumably being cast as a fidgeting foil to his opposite number, the immobile Bill Beaumont.

Hughes's time on the show is perhaps best remembered for the moment when his relentless banter and easy familiarity with his guests became too much for one of them - Princess Anne - who, used to dealing with ill-disciplined puppies, showed no hesitation in putting him in his place.

Hughes was, in fact, an ardent monarchist, and in 1980, when he was due to collect his OBE at Buckingham Palace, feigned an excuse for not attending when he discovered that it was due to be presented to him not by the Queen herself but by Prince Philip. He later received the appointment from her, saying afterwards: "All I've ever wanted to do was meet her."

His television work petered out in the late 1980s, and he subsequently worked as an after-dinner speaker, occasional television pundit, and as the director of a firm producing novelty gifts. Until recently he had commented on sport for Real Radio, based in Yorkshire. He lived near Sheffield and was a keen follower of horse racing. In 2003 he was found to have a brain tumour, and underwent emergency surgery.

He is survived by his wife Barbara, their son Emlyn and daughter Emma.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/1476235/Emlyn-Hughes.html




Quote

Emlyn Hughes

Exhuberant left-half for Liverpool and England, who became a TV personality.

   

Emlyn Hughes, captain of Liverpool and England, a forceful and exuberant left-half, whose charging runs upfield earned him the nickname Crazy Horse, has died aged 57. He underwent surgery for a brain tumour in August last year and his condition deteriorated in the last few days.

In his 12 years at Liverpool, Hughes won the league title four times, the European Cup and Uefa Cup twice each, the FA Cup once, and the League Cup with his next club, Wolverhampton Wanderers. He won 62 England caps, 23 as captain.

After his playing career, Hughes became a popular figure on British television, appearing regularly as team captain on the BBC's A Question Of Sport. He was also a successful after-dinner speaker.

There is little doubt that his talents were seen to best advantage when he played in midfield, where he could give them the fullest expression. Essentially a right-footed player, he was never wholly at ease when used at left-back. His natural, adventurous instinct was to overlap down the flank, but whenever he did so, however many opponents he left behind, there was always that frustrating moment at the end of the run when he had to switch the ball from his weaker left foot to his powerful right, so that the cross was always an inswinger, after vital seconds had been lost. But he could play in three different positions.

Hughes was born in Barrow, the son of a Welsh international rugby league player who had toured Australia as a forward with the British Lions in 1946. At school he played rugby, but soccer appealed to him more, and he eventually succumbed to the offers of the manager of Blackpool, Ron Suart. Hughes was then an inside forward, but Blackpool turned him into a left-half, and as such he made his debut for them in the 1965-66 season.

The following season saw him gain a regular place in the side, watched from the terraces by his proud father, who was wont to extol his son's merits to surrounding fans. Hughes played 28 League games for the Seasiders that season, before Bill Shankly, the famously idiosyncratic manager of the Liverpool club, a tough Scotsman who had once played right-half for his country, brought him to Anfield for £65,000, then a record sum for a full-back, which at the time he was.

He was fast, he was strong, he tackled well and he showed an enthusiasm which was sometimes branded as excessive. Boyish to a degree, it was a quality which would never disappear from his game, and his high voice became familiar to those who could hear it from the field and those who, in later years, saw him on BBC television, not afraid to put his arm around even a princess.

He played 10 first division games for Liverpool in 1967-68; thereafter he was an irreplaceable member of a team which grew steadily to dominate not only the English, but the European game. He broke into the England team in November 1969, as a left-back in a friendly game against Holland in Amsterdam. When he played against Portugal at Wembley the following December, a game which England won 1-0 in unconvincing fashion, one wrote of him, "England's attacking potential was further compromised by the choice of a left-back who won't use his left foot. Emlyn Hughes, a fine, forceful player for Liverpool, ran through often into the empty space on the left. Each time, alas, there was a mandatory hiatus when he carefully adjusted himself to centre with his right foot. This, in an epoch when every second counts, is perfectly absurd and might be distinctly costly were Hughes faced by a better right-winger, Jairzinho (Brazil) or Magnusson (Sweden), who would run him down the line."

Hughes never played in a World Cup. In 1970, he was a member of the England squad, which, as holders, competed in Mexico, but Alf Ramsey, the manager, preferred the left-footed Terry Cooper and the equally left-footed Bob McNab as cover.

Hughes, however, had a major international career, which lasted to the 1979-80 season when, having joined Wolves from Liverpool, he made his last three appearances for England, two as a substitute.

He was footballer of the year in 1977. With Liverpool, he won championship medals in the 1975-76, 1976-77, 1978-79 and 1979-80 seasons. He appeared for them in three Wembley Cup Finals: losers to Arsenal in 1971, winners against Newcastle United in 1974 and losers against Manchester United in 1977. He played 657 games for Liverpool, scoring 48 goals.

After Arsenal had won the cup with a late goal by Charlie George, Hughes told Shankly: "I'm very, very sorry Boss, that last goal was down to me; I was knackered!" "That's all right, Emlyn," Shanks is said to have replied, "everybody makes mistakes!" Only, as Hughes walked away, to remark unkindly that this was the man who had lost them the cup final. He was awarded the OBE in 1980.

Two of Hughes's finest achievements were to lead Liverpool to victory in the European Cup finals of 1977 in Rome, against Borussia Mönchengladbach and at Wembley, in 1978, against Bruges, each time in perhaps his best position, at left-sided centre-back.

After Wolves, he played for Rotherham United as player-manager, Hull City, Mansfield Town and Swansea City.

In addition to his TV appearances, Hughes worked for Yorkshire-based Real Radio as their main sports pundit for two and a half years. After launching their phone-in, he worked for the station until the end of last season. He was also vice-president of the Dystonia Society, concerned with the neurological disorder.

He is survived by his wife Barbara, son Emlyn Jr and daughter Emma.

· Emlyn Hughes, footballer, born August 28 1947; died November 9 2004

 http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2004/nov/10/guardianobituaries.media

 * guardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media Limited 2010



He was one of the old guard that had moved on just when I became hooked on football as a 10 year old.  I remember "Could Hansen really replace Crazy Horse?".  Continue the excellence - maybe and, eventually, yes.  Replace - no, not according to older lot. 

He passed away just before #5 and far too young

F cancer

YNWA



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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #30 on: February 19, 2010, 03:21:01 AM »
Absolutely fantastic post, an hour very well spent. Miss that man so much.
Anyone got a link to the question of sport bit with princess anne, so funny!!

down about half way   ;D

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/question_of_sport/qs_history/3042810.stm

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #31 on: February 19, 2010, 03:33:26 AM »
Absolutley brilliant posts Phil and Shanklyboy. Well done lads they're both cracking reads. I've sat here and watched every clip and read every word and I still want more. Well before my time unfortunately but I'm in awe of the man and what he achieved. As someone said above he seems almost the very definition of a 'Shankly' player.

Couldn't half hit a ball either judging by those clips! Love these kinds of posts and reading all the stories from those great days. Thanks again lads!
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Offline Mecca Kenny 77

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #32 on: February 19, 2010, 07:49:55 AM »
Thanks for the post. Good read. BTW in the 72-73 team photo does anyone realise that there were 2 Sami Hyypia lookalike (one is Thompson ofcourse) No wonder they were fantastic!

Offline colt

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #33 on: February 19, 2010, 08:20:43 AM »
Great read,thanks for that.:)
"If you can believe it and conceive it,you can achieve it." - Some random Liverpool fan after winning the 08/09 League.

Offline cornish exile

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #34 on: February 19, 2010, 08:37:31 AM »
great posts you 2.
those of us of a certain age were lucky to have seen emlyn play live.
what a player, what a captain, what a character he was.
cried when he died.
"He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion" – -- Unknown

Offline Billy1561

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #35 on: February 19, 2010, 08:57:52 AM »
What a fantastic opening post! Brilliant read and loads of great memories there.
Remember running out onto the school pitch many a time as Emlyn Hughes and crunching the 4 or 5 George Bests in the other team.  ;D
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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #36 on: February 19, 2010, 09:05:44 AM »
Nice one both of you (Phil and Shanklyboy). :)

Offline kopitekop1

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #37 on: February 19, 2010, 09:23:47 AM »
Fantastic tributes to a truly wonderful man and player. I dont mind admitting I am choked reading this.
Just a true Legend.
RIP Crazy Horse
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Offline finchy1972

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #38 on: February 19, 2010, 09:29:14 AM »
One of the most prized possesions i have is a framed picture of crazyhorse signed by the man himself , love the guy . Legend
Whatever we are , we are , whatever we will be is yet to be written .

Offline Phil M

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Re: Emlyn - A Tribute to Crazy Horse
« Reply #39 on: February 19, 2010, 11:24:41 AM »
Absolutely fantastic post, an hour very well spent. Miss that man so much.
Anyone got a link to the question of sport bit with princess anne, so funny!!

It's in the post mate, at the bottom, there's a link. Cheers everyone.
It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.