Author Topic: #SHANKLY100 Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson  (Read 6173 times)

royhendo

  • Guest
#SHANKLY100 Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« on: February 25, 2009, 03:46:03 PM »
When I was picking my side for the All Time Draft, I was lucky enough to pick up this fella. This was my little write-up.

  Left Wing/Mid: Willie Stevenson

Already a European Cup semi finalist with Rangers before arriving at Anfield, he was ahead of his time. A tactically intelligent player's player whose defensive graft and offensive silk was key to our passing and movement. Won everything and then some in the strongest Scottish League of all time, then won the league for us in 64 and 66. Arguably the key player in our 65 Cup Final win, and a standout in the club's first big assault on Europe. 
---
[Please check out the draft thread, and vote now or Sarge will Roger Hunt you down and kill you - that's Roger you, and then Hunt you... and then kill you.

http://www.redandwhitekop.com/forum/index.php?topic=236236.0 ]

---



So what's the big deal with Willie Stevenson?

Well, let's see. If you get a bunch of old men in a room and ply them with a few whiskies, no matter where you are in the world (save for maybe an AA meeting) it's likely that talk is going to turn to the beautiful game, and the beautiful play they've witnessed over the years.

That's a memory I have of my formative years, being at my cousin's wedding, and listening to my Dad chewing the cud with his brothers and their mates over some of the players they'd admired over the years.

Now this was the early 1980s, and I was a sat on my old boy's knee listening without much of a clue who most of these people were, but when they compared the older players with a Davie Cooper, or a Kenny Dalglish, you'd get a handle on what they meant, and you'd build up a long list of questions in your head for the next day.

One of the main themes I remember was the 'great wingers' debate. Naturally talk turned to Jimmy Johnstone before all others - such is life north of the border - but then inevitably people would trot out the names of greats like Slim Jim Baxter, Willie Henderson, and, as mentioned above, Davie Cooper.

But one player my Dad and Uncle insisted on namechecking was Willie Stevenson.

This largely led to blank looks around the table as I recall, but they were insistent. He was a class act, and it was a disgrace more people didn't realise it.

You see, Stevenson, long before his call from Shanks, had been a first team regular at Glasgow Rangers.

He played 73 first team games between 58 and 62 under Scott Symon, which seems pretty nondescript... but then you realise that two of those seasons saw the emergence of a young Jim Baxter. Baxter in his day was a mercurial talent. A player with extravagant swagger whose talents are lauded to this day in Scotland much like Johnstone's are from the other side of the sectarian divide.

His rise saw Willie Stevenson become gradually marginalised at Rangers, but that said, he'd started out as a first team regular. In his time there, Rangers won the League in 1959, Scottish Cup in 1960, the League and League Cup in 61 (the year Jock Stein's Dunfermline side won the Scottish Cup), and both domestic cups in 62. They reached the European Cup semi finals in 1959-60, only to lose to Eintracht Frankfurt... who then went on to face Puskas and Di Stefano in a nondescript contest at Hampden.

It's easy to dismiss Scottish football these days but at that time it was one of the strongest leagues in Europe. Rangers got to the final of the Cup Winners Cup and the semis of the European Cup, and in 63 Dundee got to the semi final of the European Cup under a certain Bob Shankly - formerly of Glenbuck, Ayrshire.

Willie Stevenson held his place in the most successful side in the country at a time when Hibs were just falling into decline after their 'famous five' years, and Hearts, Dundee, Kilmarnock, and Dunfermline were all fighting for trophies. Celtic were having a hard time of it and ended up nabbing the young whippersnapper who was in charge of Dunfermline. It turned out that fella was ahead of his time aswell though, and Celtic promptly went on to win 9 leagues in a row, and some diddy trophy in Lisbon.

So it's probably safe to say Stevenson was an accomplished player at the time... a first team regular in the strongest team in what was, at the time, a very strong league.

But he was an enigma. He wasn't your archetypal left winger - he was a modern left half - and there wasn't much scope for his talents in Symon's plans. Symon wanted little skilful lads who could beat their man and get a cross in. His was a team that, like most other teams of the era, favoured two traditional wingers who'd get paint on their boots and not concern themselves with the finer points of the tactical game.

Here's a quote from Willie himself on the subject...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2001/sep/18/guardianobituaries.brianglanville

Quote
"When you look back at that year, our lack of knowledge was laughable. Alex Scott, for instance, had tremendous ability to beat a man, but he was not allowed to stray from his touchline and intrude on other people's territory."


He eventually tired of not getting first team football and headed off on loan to Australia of all places - a strange footballing choice in those days.

The trip wasn't really suiting him, however, and as it happened, Shanks saw his chance and he took it. He rustled up Ł20,000 out of the men in the grey suits and in October 1962, Willie Stevenson became a Red.

So what did Shanks buy, and how did he fit into the jigsaw?

Well, as mentioned above, he wasn't a left winger - he was a 'modern left half'. Possibly that hints at aspects of his play that defied traditional 'pigeonholing' in those days. You might say he was ahead of his time.

First of all, his movement with and without the ball. When good football writers talk about Stevenson, they use words like "glide" and "silk".

You get the impression of a player who fits the bill as the archetypal old-fashioned left half, but also a modern midfield player with the defensive strength and tactical cuteness to complement and improve the game of those around him. He could use the ball, his passing was excellent, and he also got forward in support of his forwards with intelligent movement.

He seems to have been the kind of player, in short, who Rafa would like in the squad. A Level 3 player, if you'll excuse me the tag.

The point of these threads is to cajole you guys into letting us into your memories of these players, but before we do that, here are a few sample descriptions from some of RAWK's finest.


The team of Lawrence, Lawler, Byrne, Milne, Yeats, Stevenson, Callaghan, Hunt, St John, Smith and Thompson was the finest group of players ever assembled in my life so far and we were capable of winning everything. My personal favourite at this time was Willie Stevenson, he was pure class, he played the role that in later years Ray Kennedy made his own. But Stevenson's distribution of the ball was second to none. If you consider rolling Souness and Kennedy into one, you would have what Willie was.

Willie was strong in the tackle, but he was also a classy player with a sweet left foot.  The arrival of Peter thompson in the 63/64 season saw Willie's form improve further, and most observers made him man of the match in the '65 cup final with Leeds when, after a wait of over 70 years, the F.A. cup finally made its way into Liverpool's trophy-cabinet for the first time.  Willie was known as the dressing room joker and did a lot for the morale of the side. Willie won a second championship medal in 1966 and was also a regular member of the side in the first few exciting years of European club competition...

A Thompson cross from the left was deflected by Harris, straight into the path of the forward running Stevenson. His delicate lob left Mae West totally flat footed. The blue fans fell silent...

...Another run by Thompson led to the fourth. He had done Wright twice again, before he pulled back the ball to Stevenson. Willie's cross was met by a stooping Sir Roger. 4-0 and the Kop decided to raise the noise levels even more. ?We want five, we want five? echoed around the ground.

From 'The Liverpool Football Book'  edited by Derek Hodgson 1970:

'The test was to come in the First [Division] where, as one famous manager put it, 'they don't give you room to spit'. Shrewd observers not blinded by allegiance to the Liverpool flag, had dark reservations about the side's re-entry into the top flight.

Such was the background to the arrival, via Australia, of Willie Stevenson in October 1962, for a transfer fee variously reported at Ł20,000 and Ł35,000....whatever the price, it turned out to be a gilt-edged investment....

...Shankly wanted blend - that hard-to-define aspect of every successful side. He found it, possibly to a finer degree than the most successful manager of the Sixties had dared to hope for in one of his most optimistic moods.

Stevenson brought a new element to the side. He gave Liverpool an extra finesse in a hard-working side which allowed him to express his talent and flair for attack from midfield. Often Stevenson took his game to and even beyond that of any midfield player imported from Scotland since the war.....

...A lesser character than Stevenson would have developed permanent doubts about his ability. After two 'glorious years' which saw the Rangers of Glasgow win both League and Cup, Stevenson drifted into a dispute with his club.

He emigrated, perhaps impulsively, to Australia, where he agreed to join the Apia club in Sydney. A wage of Ł30 for playing and Ł30 as a storekeeper, plus sunshine, sounded like paradise regained until a technical difficulty over his registration with FIFA...exploded about him.

In three months, Stevenson did not play. He had not kicked a ball in serious competition for six months when he decided to pay his fare of Ł326 for the 12,000 mile flight and headed back towards Glasgow.

It was time for Stevenson to take stock of himself after what he admits was a 'nightmare experience', now knowing that Liverpool were to be the winners among a horde of English clubs willing to sign him. Shankly had not forgotten the slim youngster whose only club attachment used to be Hibs in Edinburgh.

Life had been good at Rangers....'like walking on air'. The sky was Rangers' blue only to be suddenly clouded. 'I lost form,' recalled Stevenson. 'They dropped me. I was playing terribly. I struggled even in the reserve side. In the end I came to the conclusion that I was burned out by the years at the top as such a young player  among so many great names like Jimmy Millar and Ralph Brand, to name but two'.

The talent, however, was still there waiting to be roused. Shankly did it with his own special brand of inspiration and leadership. Despite Stevenson being desperately short of training, Shankly and the Liverpool delegation swooped.

Stevenson repaid the confidence in full, making his debut (in a losing side) at Anfield against Burnley to begin a prosperous reign that lasted until the start of the 1968/69 season when Emlyn Hughes exploded on the scene after his transfer from Blackpool.'

Willie Stevenson would be another choice of mine.

While all around him received praise, it was rare to hear Willie's name being called from the kop in the early days.
Hunt and St John took all the praise from the kop.

If I had to compare him with a more recent player, he was at least equal to Ray Kennedy.

Wiilie was a very cultured player, he had a grace about the way he strolled around the left flank, supplying deadly through passes for the strikers or wingers of the day.

In my opinion, which some may doubt or knock, Willie Stevenson won us the FA Cup in 1965.

If you ever get a chance to watch the game, concentrate of Stevo's performance, it was awesome.

Stevenson was the silent type of player. Never got flustered, rock solid and rock hard. Was know as the granite kin, being from Aberdeen. Had a rocket like shot, but could also place a ball into the back of the net from outside the box. Great tackler and passer of the ball. Very really did Willie give away stray passes.

Being the quiet type he never received the credit he often deserved.

There's a few clips on youtube that are worth watching. Some of his movment and passing around the box is fantastic. Cliche... but it looked well ahead of it's time, just simple give and go some of it but so effective and practically impossible for the other team to counter.

I've watched him in the FA Cup final countless times. He was pure class in that game.

I think it's the Inter game as well when he stands out. It's funny. When I fell in love with Liverpool in the early 70s and swotted up on its lore and legends, Willie Stevenson's name didn't loom very large. His photos didn't appear in Topical Times or Football Monthly and he couldn't compete in the fame stakes with Yeats, St John, Hunt, Smith, Thompson, Callaghan, Lawler. Just writing those names sends a shiver down the spine. They were phenomenal players in a phenomenal team. But I wonder if Stevenson wasn't up there with them. When you see old footage of that team it's Stevenson's beautiful, economical glide across the turf that catches the eye. He looks supremely comfortable on the ball and quick to do things.

I've got a pal who made his Kop debut in '58 and thinks Stevenson was the best of the lot. (I occasionally try and get him to post on RAWK but he's a lurker not a poster!). But I'd love to hear from anyone who saw Willie Stevenson in his pomp. 

I can tell you that Willie was the best player on the pitch in the '65 Final without question.

Yes, he was a great player but you don't hear much about him now as we were never on TV those days. He was the one who slipped it through to Gerry Byrne for the first goal in the 1965 Cup Final, if I remember right. He was also one of the best penalty takers we ever had. Can't remember him missing many.
He was my granddad's favourite player too. It took him a long time to appreciate Emlyn Hughes. He didn't see boundless energy as a substitute for pure class!

Willie Stevenson brought a special touch of class

---

Anyway - please take it from here fellas. I can't do him nearly the justice you guys can. Before finishing off though, check this out - it's a nice read.

It is probably worth quoting from The Shankly Years for those who do not know the story remembered by Barry Farrell.

Negotiations were complete and Shanks was showing Willie (Stevenson) around Anfield. One incident sticks in my memory. Shanks stepped out of a car with Willie and they were about to enter the players' entrance. There was a small group of wide-eyed Liverpool kids waiting by the entrance pens ready, hoping to obtain the autographs of any of their heroes who might happen to pass by. Willie went to walk into the entrance when Shanks exclaimed, 'Willie, son! You've forgotten something.' Liverpool's latest acquisition looked bemused as he wondered what his new boss was talking about. 'You've forgotten something, son,' Shanks repeated. Willie was still none the wiser. 'Willie, son, go and sign the children?s books,' Shanks quietly ordered. Willie looked relieved and was only too happy to comply with his manager's wishes. It may appear an insignificant incident, but it gives an example of how Shankly was eager to display to a new signing that the Anfield brethren, whether young or old, come first.

More a reflection on Shanks than Willie himself... but a nice one eh?
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 01:35:49 PM by The 92A »

royhendo

  • Guest
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2009, 04:00:31 PM »
Did I mention that you can vote on the All Time Draft thread? Did I?

http://www.redandwhitekop.com/forum/index.php?topic=236236.0

:wave   ;D

Offline rednich85

  • Gargantuan Wanker. Intimately linked to Keys and Gray.
  • RAWK Supporter
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 17,633
  • Stay Black. That's the most important thing.
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2009, 04:32:53 PM »
Cheers Roy, as per usual, great read.

Never knew nothing about him (bar the name)

Thankks
"Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons."

@rednich85

Offline Phil M

  • RAWK’s most prolific poster. (NB. Hit 50k posts and someone at the top didn't like it!) Currently the subject of a Rawk mod conspiracy.
  • RAWK Supporter
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 57,700
  • “Bravery is believing in yourself" Rafael Benitez
    • I coulda been a contenda.....
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2009, 04:52:54 PM »
Nice one Roy, another excellent piece on a forgotten Red hero.
It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

Offline El Denzel Pepito

  • Tight-fisted and unimaginative moany wannabe feedback tourist. More Michael O'Leary than Dermot...but will also give out noshes.
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 14,134
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2009, 04:53:41 PM »
Great read mate :thumbup

Offline Polo

  • Main Stander
  • ***
  • Posts: 121
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2009, 06:32:35 PM »
Two things I noted about Stevenson.   1.   He made a decent stop-gap centre-half!
2.  He wasn't the fastest thing on two legs but he made up for that with his football brain.

Offline bigbear

  • offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to arrest and imprisonment of the international porridge thief and furniture wrecker Goldilocks
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 24,567
  • We all Live in a Red and White Kop
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2009, 07:37:02 PM »
My dad always talked him up as a truly good player.

I've watched the 65 cup final and highlights of the 65 era (Inter etc) and he looked very easy on the eye. I was amazed to see he was never capped.

Was he a drinker ? I only ask as I feel I'd heard it somewhere else and the story of the disillusioned scottish footballer heading to Australia when he was as good as he was makes one think.

royhendo

  • Guest
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #7 on: March 4, 2009, 02:23:58 PM »
Seems Willie is genuinely forgotten eh? :(

Offline gabialonso

  • Kemlynite
  • **
  • Posts: 44
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #8 on: March 4, 2009, 06:56:22 PM »
no never forgotten, just the memories fade. He was pure class.

royhendo

  • Guest
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #9 on: March 5, 2009, 10:28:52 AM »
no never forgotten, just the memories fade. He was pure class.

Did you see much of him playing Gabialonso?

Offline gabialonso

  • Kemlynite
  • **
  • Posts: 44
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #10 on: March 5, 2009, 06:56:53 PM »
yes but just a kid and the memories are all too vague. You're left with general impressions rather than being able to point to specifics ( or at least I am when I try to recall the 1960s team). Stevo always gave the impression of moving with grace and doing things with effortless ease. You've got Cally working away like a train and Roger running all day and chasing down every chance and a lot of our play based on power but Willie was never hurried and it just seemed natural. I dont think that type of player exists now, or at least could exist at the pace the Prem is played at now. In fact you could say that when Shanks bought Emlyn he was buying into the future because Emlyn at a100 mile an hour was everything Willie wasn't.

Offline redtel

  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,876
  • Sir Roger-Scored first goal ever on MOTD.
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #11 on: March 5, 2009, 08:16:00 PM »
Although he was the quiet man of the team all the fans at that time rated him as our most cultured player.

By that, I mean he could pass the ball as well as Gordon Milne, but he moved about the pitch in a smoother way, appearing not to be using as much energy. Graceful I suppose.

Had a hell of a strong shot as well, and like all great players seemed to have time on the ball. This was amazing because he wasn't the fastest man in the team but often appeared in space moving alone before slipping a pass to another red shirt.

The 1965 FAC Final film shows him at his best if you can get a copy.
We are so fortunate to have got another great manager. We had a great manager in Rafa and collectively we fucked it up. If we'd all stood behind him there's no way the club would have found it so easy to sack him. So please, let's not fuck it up again.
Alan X

The man (Mourinho) plays cowards football on Real Madrid's budget.

Offline Phil M

  • RAWK’s most prolific poster. (NB. Hit 50k posts and someone at the top didn't like it!) Currently the subject of a Rawk mod conspiracy.
  • RAWK Supporter
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 57,700
  • “Bravery is believing in yourself" Rafael Benitez
    • I coulda been a contenda.....
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #12 on: March 5, 2009, 10:17:40 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/EXST6OXuxzM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/EXST6OXuxzM</a>

Lovely skill by Willie to set up Byrne who crosses for Hunt to put us in front :

<a href="http://www.dailymotion.com/swf/x1hmik_liverpool-21-leeds_sport" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.dailymotion.com/swf/x1hmik_liverpool-21-leeds_sport</a>

It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

royhendo

  • Guest
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #13 on: March 5, 2009, 10:47:06 PM »
Quality ;D

Love the way the Saint is "Sinjun"

Offline Terry de Niro

  • Cellar dweller feller, ya know
  • RAWK Scribe
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 45,198
  • Are you talkin' to me or chewin' a brick?
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #14 on: March 6, 2009, 12:06:38 AM »
I've only just noticed this. Sterling work again royhendo..  :wave
"If you can't support us when we lose or draw, don't support us when we win"

http://www.redandwhitekop.com/forum/index.php?topic=219996.msg7899639#msg7899639

Rest in peace Ray Osborne/shanklyboy

Offline gritsvanilla

  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,890
  • A Light Souffle With Razor Blades
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #15 on: March 6, 2009, 01:21:04 AM »
One of my arl fellas absolute fave players to ever pull on the red shirt, a tad before my time but i've been regaled with many stories about Willie's on the field exploits, i'm not sure if it was him or Peter Thompson but my dad used to say that he'd beat his full back once and then go back for another go! Good work Roy, always nice to read about the legends from the past, i'm appalled that some of the kids today don't know about the forgotten gems from my early years (Lindsay, Little Bamber, Cormack, Alun Evans etc) so it's always nice to read about those from just before my time.

royhendo

  • Guest
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #16 on: March 6, 2009, 08:36:22 AM »
One of my arl fellas absolute fave players to ever pull on the red shirt, a tad before my time but i've been regaled with many stories about Willie's on the field exploits, i'm not sure if it was him or Peter Thompson but my dad used to say that he'd beat his full back once and then go back for another go! Good work Roy, always nice to read about the legends from the past, i'm appalled that some of the kids today don't know about the forgotten gems from my early years (Lindsay, Little Bamber, Cormack, Alun Evans etc) so it's always nice to read about those from just before my time.

Well... next up for me is James Jackson Jr (courtesy of Zimmie5555's suggestion) but how do you feel about writing one for some of those guys, or working with one of the scribes on them?

Offline WaterfordRed

  • RAWK Supporter
  • Main Stander
  • ******
  • Posts: 176
  • We all Live in a Red and White Kop
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #17 on: March 6, 2009, 10:24:25 AM »
One of my arl fellas absolute fave players to ever pull on the red shirt, a tad before my time but i've been regaled with many stories about Willie's on the field exploits, i'm not sure if it was him or Peter Thompson but my dad used to say that he'd beat his full back once and then go back for another go! Good work Roy, always nice to read about the legends from the past, i'm appalled that some of the kids today don't know about the forgotten gems from my early years (Lindsay, Little Bamber, Cormack, Alun Evans etc) so it's always nice to read about those from just before my time.
Your Dad was absolutely right.
Willie Stevenson was a very special player and it is right that he should be properly remembered here.
Peter Thompson did the full back thing and it was a pleasure to watch.
Have just watched a Peter Cormack interview on lfc.tv
SOS 8040

royhendo

  • Guest
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2009, 09:15:29 PM »
10.30pm tonight on LFC TV, 60 Minutes with Willie Stevenson.

:)

Offline bigbear

  • offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to arrest and imprisonment of the international porridge thief and furniture wrecker Goldilocks
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 24,567
  • We all Live in a Red and White Kop
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #19 on: October 26, 2009, 09:18:52 PM »
10.30pm tonight on LFC TV, 60 Minutes with Willie Stevenson.

:)
Cheers, just calling my dad to let him know (though he's normally glued to it anyway !)

royhendo

  • Guest
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #20 on: October 26, 2009, 10:38:03 PM »
Amazing how posh an Edinburgh accent he has.

Offline Sarge

  • Fucker
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 63,627
  • Ahh Ha!!
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #21 on: October 26, 2009, 10:41:51 PM »
roy we must start these off again.
If you don’t stand for something you will fall for anything.

royhendo

  • Guest
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #22 on: October 26, 2009, 10:47:02 PM »
I know mate. What happened to the closing stages of that cup?

Offline Sarge

  • Fucker
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 63,627
  • Ahh Ha!!
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #23 on: October 26, 2009, 10:49:59 PM »
I know mate. What happened to the closing stages of that cup?

True forgot about that. Who is next up then?
If you don’t stand for something you will fall for anything.

Offline CRAZY HORSE EMLYN

  • Lives for twats
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,070
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #24 on: October 26, 2009, 10:51:40 PM »
Funny you mention Glenbuck in the original post, actually met him there some years back along with Yeats when they unveiled the Shankly plaque. Was too young to have seen him play though!

royhendo

  • Guest
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #25 on: October 27, 2009, 07:28:23 AM »
Bob Shankly would have had a word with his brother you'd think eh?

Sarge - we wer about to play the semis and HBHR was getting us lathered up nicely. Shanks1965 is favourite in my book.

Offline Phil M

  • RAWK’s most prolific poster. (NB. Hit 50k posts and someone at the top didn't like it!) Currently the subject of a Rawk mod conspiracy.
  • RAWK Supporter
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 57,700
  • “Bravery is believing in yourself" Rafael Benitez
    • I coulda been a contenda.....
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #26 on: October 27, 2009, 07:26:36 PM »
Bob Shankly would have had a word with his brother you'd think eh?

Sarge - we wer about to play the semis and HBHR was getting us lathered up nicely. Shanks1965 is favourite in my book.

Was that not decided? Thought that thread had been concluded ages ago.
It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

Offline Fat Scouser

  • Trolley Dolly with a 54 2/3 inch waist - last seen shopping on Scottie Road for speedos. Is just a bit.....you know.....
  • RAWK Writer
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 23,906
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #27 on: October 27, 2009, 08:38:12 PM »
I saw Willie on lfctv last night. I saw Tommy Lawrence on there today an all. Could say loads, but will just say... both of them looked great. Really healthy and well for fellas of their age. In fact, The Flying Pig looked better than in his playing days - certainly slimmer anyway.
"A peasant you are. A peasant you will remain. And we shall use all our wealth and power, to make your lot even worse and keep you exactly where you are, Bondage!"    The Boy King, Richard II, after  putting down the The Peasants Revolt in 1381.

http://misterinobody.weebly.com/

royhendo

  • Guest
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2009, 06:57:15 AM »
Was that not decided? Thought that thread had been concluded ages ago.

Nah Phil - Shanks is straining at the leish. Semi final stages.

70 eh? What a top lad aswell.

Offline Phil M

  • RAWK’s most prolific poster. (NB. Hit 50k posts and someone at the top didn't like it!) Currently the subject of a Rawk mod conspiracy.
  • RAWK Supporter
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 57,700
  • “Bravery is believing in yourself" Rafael Benitez
    • I coulda been a contenda.....
Re: Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #29 on: October 28, 2009, 06:37:44 PM »
Nah Phil - Shanks is straining at the leish. Semi final stages.

70 eh? What a top lad aswell.

70? No way. Top bloke.
It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

Offline The 92A

  • Alberto Incontidor. Peneus. Phantom Thread Locker. Mr Bus. But there'll be another one along soon enough. Almost as bad as Jim...
  • RAWK Staff
  • Believer
  • ******
  • Posts: 7,028
Re: #SHANKLY100 Forgotten Heroes, part 3: Willie Stevenson
« Reply #30 on: August 26, 2013, 01:39:13 PM »
Zeb, bumped this cracking topic for the Shankly anniversary
Still Dreaming of a Harry Quinn