Author Topic: Bird watch  (Read 216876 times)

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2960 on: June 18, 2022, 07:44:38 pm »
Bee-eaters are nesting in Norfolk, for anyone who lives that way or fancy travelling a bit

details here
https://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/Content/Norfolk_quarry_hosts_breeding_Bee_eaters.aspx?s_id=538646111

Aww, such pretty things.
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Offline El_Frank

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2961 on: June 19, 2022, 09:55:33 am »
Have the Bee-eaters been here before Armand?

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2962 on: June 20, 2022, 11:49:35 am »
Proper heart melt moment just now.  Driving up to the house and as we're approaching the gate a red legged partridge appeared from the long grass followed by about half a dozen of the tiniest chicks 🥰

Offline Armand9

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2963 on: June 21, 2022, 06:47:43 am »
Have the Bee-eaters been here before Armand?

we get european bee-eaters every year as what are known as overshoot spring migrants (species that summer around the med typcially but on their journey back from their wintering grounds in spring they travel that little bit too far and end up in the uk - purple herons, alpine swifts, hoopoes are typical examples and we know every year we'll get them as overshoots). Bee-eaters tho are rarer than the birds i've listed there and some years are good years for them, with a good few sightings, and some years are poor for them with very few sightings. So spring overshoots are still rare birds for us but we know they will happen.

if successful, i believe this will the the sixth time bee-eaters have bred in the uk, which is great for any who want to go see them, cos typically bee-eaters dont hang about and the vast majority of sightings are single observer sightings of birds flying overhead and never seen again, or a bird/s on wires for 20 minutes or so and then bugger off.

There are almost thirty species of bee-eater in the world, so they're quite a large family type and european bee-eater is the only one we can expect to get. Tho there is another bee-eater species that has occured in the uk but it is extremely rare with only a few records and that is the gorgeous blue-cheeked bee-eater (tho all bee-eaters are gorgeous really  ;D). The closest they breed to us is North Africa, so no surpise they are extremely rare to the uk, whereas european bee-eaters breed in southern europe.

Blue-cheeked Bee-Eater
« Last Edit: June 21, 2022, 06:55:52 am by Armand9 »
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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2964 on: June 21, 2022, 08:10:30 am »
It looks like the adult greenfinches we had on the feeders recently have had a successful brood as the young are now with them being fed 🥰

Offline Armand9

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2965 on: June 21, 2022, 09:22:39 am »
great news

greenfinches have been decimated from my area (and much of the uk), i dont even see them anymore
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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2966 on: June 21, 2022, 11:50:45 am »
great news

greenfinches have been decimated from my area (and much of the uk), i dont even see them anymore

I know their numbers are down and we didn't have any in the garden last year which was why it was lovely to see them a few weeks ago and now with their young.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2967 on: June 21, 2022, 12:36:13 pm »
There is a proper wild pond over the road from my house - I've just been over for a nose to see how the moorhen are getting on, and to my great surprise we have baby ducks  ;D  Couldn't see any baby moorhens though but I did see one of the adults.
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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2968 on: June 21, 2022, 12:39:10 pm »
great news

greenfinches have been decimated from my area (and much of the uk), i dont even see them anymore

I grew up in central Huddersfield in 1960s/70s and pretty much everywhere around me was terraced houses and old textile mills. The rec was the one bit of colour apart from the odd yellow-coloured Ford Anglia and the traffic lights - and even on the rec most of the grass had long gone. The mighty exception to all this were the greenfinches. All you needed to do was put a string sock of peanuts up in the yard and the place was absolutely in emblazoned with green and yellow. The green finches which came to feed were even more common than sparrows and starlings. They absolutely lit up the place and people loved them for that.

These days, it seems, I can go a whole year without seeing s single one.
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Offline El_Frank

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2969 on: June 21, 2022, 03:09:29 pm »
I'm not seeing many Greenfinches these days either, plenty of Goldfinches about but not Green. There's bloody loads of Chiffchaffs about though, I've never heard so many as I am doing this year.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2970 on: June 21, 2022, 04:33:20 pm »
that's good news on the chaffinches cos they've been hit alarmingly as well

in the last 11 years they've declined 30% - that is obviously a huge drop off and so quick that there is genuine concern for it's future in the uk, which seems crazy as it was once one of our most common birds

their decline is not fully understood but the disease that has so badly affected greenfinches is considered one factor - trichomonisis, a disease caused by a parasite - as will loss of habitat but there's more to it than that cos while trichomonisis has been widely reported in greenfinches from observations from the public, it hasn't been reported in chaffinches to the extent you'd expect for such a decline, so something is going on we're missing.

goldfinches have increased 250% since 1990, a genuine success finch story among the gloom.

all these population trends are, at least to some degree, attributed to the increase of garden feeding (including many do it year round now while before it was usually only in winter) and the spread of trichomonisis among finches (and other species) has been linked to dirty feeding and drinking stations in our gardens, ie many dont clean them and the disease is passed on via them. I dont know if it's as clearcut as that cos trichomonisis has a very short exposed lifespan outside the body, so it would appear to me it's mainly the congregating of birds together at feeding stations that is passing the parasite on, rather than the husbandry of those feeding stations directly, tho of course cleaning them is good advice.

on goldfinches, garden feeding has benefitted them in expanding but i'd thought it's also linked to the demise in greenfinches and now chaffinches as competing species

overall garden feeding has brought a lot of benefits to urban birds but we need to be mindful of having clean stations (food and water for drinking/bathing), so at least that element of the problem can be eliminated/reduced

tho if im looking at the problem in general and take my local patch, which i've been birding at regularly for 40 years or so, it's a huge man made lake bordered by woodland, grassland and meadows, in the middle of the countryside. it has had some parts opened up to the public but the habitat in those parts aren't much changed.

And yet the decline in small birds over that period is huge - from resident tits and finches to summer visitors like warblers. That can't be attributed to feeders alone and i'd argue not even a major degree (greenfinches may be the exception) and in many of the species isn't a factor at all cos they're not garden visitors, and it also can't be attributed to habitat loss either cos over those decades it hasn't really changed - still in the heart of countryside, the many surrounding farms pretty much the same practices, the many hedgerows still in tact, as are the woodlands. it really is puzzling and we've even lost some birds as a regular breeding species, like Marsh Tit but the food and habitat is still there, so to put it in scientific terms, fuck knows what's going on there. There's tons more i could say on the macro and micro level regarding passerines on my patch but this post is over long as it is
« Last Edit: June 21, 2022, 04:57:34 pm by Armand9 »
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Offline El_Frank

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2971 on: June 21, 2022, 06:40:53 pm »
Chiffchaffs man, Chiffchaffs!  ;D
But yeah, now you mention it, I haven't seen a Chaffinch in ages either and even then I'd only see them rarely near to houses with feeders right next to the edge of woodland. A little bit further out by the lake I'd sometimes see the Bullfinches there, but not in the gardens.
Always happy to hear more from you Armand.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2972 on: June 22, 2022, 12:20:00 am »
Only ever heard 2 cuckoo’s, both in the Lake District.

Offline Armand9

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2973 on: June 22, 2022, 06:24:50 am »
Chiffchaffs  ;D yeah, they're doing well, and they winter more regularly, or rather in greater numbers than they used to

cuckoos, another bird hammered over recent decades, there has been a lot of tagging them with locators in recent years with some amazing tracking going on, the most famous died this year - it was an old bird now, but they'd tracked that fucker for a whole bunch of years

i'd say from my own anecdotal experience that in recent years there's been a slight improvement, eg, as my local patch is full of reedbeds and therefore reed warblers (typically something like 700 pairs nest on my patch each year) and they're prime targets for cuckoos, i can assess the fall and rise of them locally at least - they were prolific years ago with tons of cuckoos on my patch in the appropriate season, then a massive decline to the point we didn't get any some years, till in the last say 7 years they're back with early spring maybe having between 2 to 5 birds - this is singing males (only the males 'cuckoo cuckoo' and this is by far the easiest way to assess numbers)

females are much more elusive, tho have a distinctive 'monkey' call (as i term it) and a more regularly heard 'bubbling' call, so you can pick them up on that or you might get lucky and see one out in the open - they fly somewhat similar to a small falcon, well it's not similar but to the inexperienced can be mistaken for a small falcon cos they give off that impression with their long tail and long pointed wings

female cuckoo 'monkey' call, you also get a blast of their more typical 'bubbling' call - i've seen it notated as 'female song', i dont view it that way as i usually hear it when they're flying, but they will do it in response to a male cuckooing, so make your own mind up
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« Last Edit: June 22, 2022, 06:29:14 am by Armand9 »
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Offline El_Frank

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2974 on: June 22, 2022, 09:00:20 am »
Cool, I never knew that about Cuckoos. I used to hear them (males) now and then years ago but haven't heard any in quite a few years. I get the occasional Tawny owl coming from the woods sometimes now instead.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2975 on: June 22, 2022, 04:44:01 pm »
Greenfinches used to be fairly common a when I was young. Lovely looking birds. But I swear I haven't seen a single one in over 10 years.
I think I read they fell victim to some disease unique to them.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2976 on: June 22, 2022, 05:18:45 pm »
unfortunately it's a parasite that causes trichomonisis and easily passed on

in other news, anyone who wants to read details of that cuckoo i mentioned yesterday, called PJ, that was tagged for years and clocked up 96,000 km before dying this year, article on it below

https://www.birdguides.com/news/bto-says-farewell-to-pj-the-cuckoo/


did the patch today, was slow going as you'd expect this time of year - spring migration is over basically, we even had some Wood Sandpipers on monday, worn adults which means they're on their way back! Failed breeders returning south to Africa already. Anyway, today i found a couple of male Common Scoters - a sea duck that migrates overland as well as around the coast, so on occasion do turn up on inland lakes - which was neat, one of my favourite ducks, an adult Yellow-legged Gull was new in - the mediterannean version of our herring gull, bit like a halfway house between herring and lesser black-backed gull, so it should be in the med but chose the west country, as you do  ;D and 6 species of raptor, which isn't shabby, so was a better day than i expected.

male common scoter - chunky beauty
« Last Edit: June 22, 2022, 05:42:53 pm by Armand9 »
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Offline El_Frank

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2977 on: June 22, 2022, 06:15:49 pm »
Awesome stuff. I can see why the Cuckoo was so revered, what a trek! I've seen the scoters before, can't remember where though, but know the shape. I like the Tufted ducks myself, they look like crime bosses of the duck world (males). Six raptors? Whoa, what kinds?

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2978 on: June 22, 2022, 06:18:14 pm »
Greenfinches used to be fairly common a when I was young. Lovely looking birds. But I swear I haven't seen a single one in over 10 years.
I think I read they fell victim to some disease unique to them.
Saw my first Greenfinch in a long time last week. First one I’ve seen since we’ve lived where we do now which is almost 7 years. Plenty of tits and goldfinches but was really chuffed to see a greenfinch. Sad to hear they’ve been badly affected by that disease
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Offline Armand9

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2979 on: June 22, 2022, 07:22:35 pm »
Awesome stuff. I can see why the Cuckoo was so revered, what a trek! I've seen the scoters before, can't remember where though, but know the shape. I like the Tufted ducks myself, they look like crime bosses of the duck world (males). Six raptors? Whoa, what kinds?

buzzards galore
6 red kites at least, had tons of sightings but knowing exactly how many birds it involves over time is tricky and you err on the side of caution cos you dont want to duplicate numbers
2 sparrowhawks
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tufted ducks are the bread and butter on my patch, we get thousands from autumn onwards and they're a very good carrier species - ie a common species that rarer species of birds will join cos their own species isn't around (basically go with what looks like you, the best fit). So once the flock starts to build up in the autumn we're forever scoping through the flock looking for anything unusual - species like Greater Scaup and Ferruginous Duck of the scarcer european ducks for us inland, and the north american species Lesser Scaup and Ringed-neck Duck are what we hope to find, over the years we've had plenty, my patch kinda comes into its own in that regard. There are also some ultra rare american ducks that could happen so you continually scan away all day in hope  ;D

as i said the scoters are a sea duck, very rare breeder in scotland but a winter visitor to coastal sites in the uk, so it's likely you saw them at the coast - the north wales coast is good for them around Llanfairfechan (not far if you're from liverpool), i've birded there a number of times, and twitched a Black Scoter there (north american version of our common scoter) in with the big flocks of common scoter some years ago
« Last Edit: June 22, 2022, 07:34:58 pm by Armand9 »
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Offline El_Frank

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2980 on: June 22, 2022, 08:45:38 pm »
I saw a raptor once and wish I could replay it in my mind in slow motion because it went so fast I couldn't identify anything about it other than it being smaller and quicker than the female Sparrowhawks I sometimes see. I suppose it could have been a male Sparrowhawk, can't say I've ever saw one in flight mind, but I've always wondered if it could have been a Hobby, but there's absolutely no way of knowing. They have always been my favourites, any bird of prey, I don't know why but ever since I was a kid they were the ones I took to, they were the ones I drew all the time.
I remember seeing a female Sparrowhawk a few months back glide over the road, round a hedge, along the front of someones house at head height and turned 90 degrees to go down the side of the house. Incredible agility and effortlessly done. Amazing things they are.
My local lake has become pretty sparse for waterfowl. There's really only the typical Mallards, a few Coots and Moorhens and a few Grebes, the occasional Mute swan. Even the Canada geese seem to have retreated to different areas. Although, an industrial estate does flow into it, more so than it used to do as well. I guess they have the sense to steer clear of it considering one end looks like someone's tipped barrels of red diesel in it now and then.  ::)
Oh, and I saw a Grey Heron twice in two days the other day. I actually sometimes get one perch up on the bungalow roof at the end of my garden (I assume they have a pond) - you don't realise how big those things are until you see them so close and in such strange places too!

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2981 on: June 22, 2022, 09:14:17 pm »
Herons are ace. I remember when my son was in a buggy and I was pushing him round the park we saw one perched motionless in the pond (as you do). Got home and one (no idea if it was the same one) was randomly on the lamppost behind our house that backed onto allotments.

There’s one who lives in the village in Northern Ireland we go to. Always see him along the river or just in the shallows where it meets the sea. When it takes off it looks absolutely huge.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2982 on: June 23, 2022, 12:48:17 am »
Herons are ace. I remember when my son was in a buggy and I was pushing him round the park we saw one perched motionless in the pond (as you do). Got home and one (no idea if it was the same one) was randomly on the lamppost behind our house that backed onto allotments.

There’s one who lives in the village in Northern Ireland we go to. Always see him along the river or just in the shallows where it meets the sea. When it takes off it looks absolutely huge.
In Sefton Park the other week we were feeding the squirrels in a wooded area. It's fairly dense in there at this time of year, with just narrow pathways through the undergrowth. Who should walk up, but a Grey Heron. Stealthily creeping through looking for rats to eat. He wasn't bothered by us at all. We left him to it.
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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2983 on: June 23, 2022, 04:00:33 pm »
Looks like we might have Kestrels nesting in a big tree on the main road behind ours. Just watched one fly over the house and leisurely fly into the top of the tree, can't see if it went into a nest as the leaves are too thick.
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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2984 on: June 28, 2022, 09:16:00 pm »
Honey Buzzard on the patch today, only second one i've ever had on the patch, very rare for my place

and 4 adult sandwich terns returning south was also nice, they're annual on my patch but very few and typically dont hang around, so was nice to have them fishing just off the hide and calling, love their calls

we had some waders new in today as well, failed breeders heading back south. Seems to me this year that returning birds have kicked in a tad early
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Offline El_Frank

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2985 on: June 28, 2022, 10:38:06 pm »
I'd love to see a Honey Buzzard. I saw something a few years back on the ground in a farmers field, about the size of a Buzzard but very grey in colour. That one has always mystified me too.
Saw some Warbler-types this morning that I think may have been female or juvenile Whitethroats after consulting my trusty bird book. The white under the beak was the standout feature but need to hopefully see them again for more of an idea. I don't think anything else similar is likely population-wise.
There's also a spot along the canal where I have heard Goldcrests this past week, but I can't find the little buggers. I've seen them there before so I know it's them but not quite as easy as last time when there were about ten of them constantly on the move.

Offline Armand9

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2986 on: June 30, 2022, 01:12:01 am »
goldcrests - pishing works on goldcrests so worth a go (i posted on pishing earlier in the thread)

with old world warblers it's extremely useful to nail it down to family first if unsure of ID, and the families you are gonna run into in the uk are:


Sylvia warblers - whitethroat, lesser whitethroat, dartford warbler, blackcap, garden warbler etc

Phylloscopus warblers (birders term 'phyllosc') - also known as leaf warblers, willow warblers and chiffchaff etc

Acrocephalus warblers (birder term 'acro') - largely reed and swamp birds, reed and sedge warblers etc

Locustella warblers - typically live in thick vegetation, grasshopper and savi's warblers (reed beds and rare)

Hippolais warblers (birders term 'hippo') - all these are rare to uk but some annual rarities (eg melodious and icterine warblers), so i wouldnt worry about them

useful general reading for a quick overview https://www.bto.org/understanding-birds/birdfacts/bird-families/warblers and you can click on the individual bird species (there are tons of rare and some extremely rare birds in there so i'd stick to looking at the common stuff)

from what you said if it does come down to whitethroat/lesser whitethroat, simplest clue even if a juvenile bird (not as distinctive) - if it's a whitethroat there will be some rufous tones in the wings, if it's a lesser whitethroat there wont be - calls are very different too (tho birds can turn up in unlikely places for its species, generally, the habitat and any calls are vital parts in helping IDing birds, so apart from what it looks like, always be mindful of everything else it's telling you)

many (there are always exceptions) warblers can be seperated into their family by how long the undertail coverts* are in relation to the tail, once known and practiced, this approach is very useful in quickly eliminating species and narrowing down your options with an unfamiliar bird - i was looking for a pic that illustrates this but can't find one online, if i ever come across one i'll post it and refer back to this post

i did start detailing how this works with the warbler families and looking for images of individual birds to illustrate the differences but it got so fucking long winded i'd take half a fucking thread lol - so annoying cos if i was stood next to you i could explain it in a minute

*



ah fuck it, just to illustrate very quickly two families to show you what i mean

two pretty plain birds that superficially look very similar and both are in reed beds - let's assume you cant hear the songs cos of traffic or distance etc and there's nothing else near it to give you an exact size, now you can look at head patterns, the tones of the plumage and other subtle clues trying to work out what you're looking at......... or





you can look at the undertail coverts and notice that the top image they are long, yes, but fall just over halfway down the tail

and in the second image you can see they are very long and almost reach the tail tip

the top image undertail coverts tell you immediately that you're looking at an acro, and the second image undertail coverts tells you immediately that you're looking at a locustella

so simply looking at the undertail coverts you've taken a huge shortcut and stopped tons of fucking around with much more difficult elements to assess

so let's say it's the bird in the second image you are trying to identify, you've gone fuck it, what's that, looks a little big but can't be sure, oh look at those undertail coverts, fuck me, it's a locustella - and the fact it's a plain bird singing in a reed bed gives you only one option, hold the fucking phones lads, i've just lucked in on a Savi's Warbler! woohoo im big billy bollocks for the day and the rest of the guys will be buying me drinks  8)
« Last Edit: August 4, 2022, 05:50:17 pm by Armand9 »
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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2987 on: June 30, 2022, 03:45:41 pm »
I'll try and take some of that on board next time I'm in the area where I saw them. It's a bit tricky for the likes of myself though because the calls & songs I'm not great with, and the further away from garden and woodland birds I get the more I'm at a loss there too. There's lots going on in the area with Blackcaps and Reed Buntings, loads of other smaller brown birds that I can't make out and sometimes plenty of others flitting about too. I think my best bet is with a visual ID, hopefully at the same kind of distance as last time but with a more analytical mindset to check for various markings. They weren't there this morning but I'll keep my eyes peeled. A quick look at your link for videos does gently support my theory for Whitethroats (female) due to a more rufous colouring rather than a bland greyish/greenish brown.

Now, Goldcrests and pishing  ;D I VERY nearly did exactly this, this morning. I was along the canal where it gets quiet, totally on my own as it's very straight there so nobody within hundreds of metres either way, and across the canal I hear that high pitched tweeting. I stopped and there they were mixed in with Long-tailed tits and juvenile Blue tits. I was about to give the pishing a try but even with hundreds of metres of freedom I still felt too daft - maybe another day!  ;D

Two mores Herons along the canal within 100 yards of each other yesterday, both in the shallows on the far side fishing.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2988 on: June 30, 2022, 05:35:32 pm »
it all takes time my friend, main thing is to enjoy it and you'll pick things up as you go along for sure. No matter what someone says, no matter how many fieldguides you read (and fieldguides are important), you can't beat experience, being out in the field is what it's all about. Sometimes you go out just to see what's about, other times you have a goal, but whatever the reason, it has to be fun and learning is half the fun if not more (i learn something pretty much everyday, literally), so when you do nail that bird on call that you couldn't previously, you're right to feel 'sweet, i've got them sorted now'.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2989 on: July 2, 2022, 10:40:32 am »
There's so many fledglings in the garden this morning.  So far I've seen sparrows, chaffinches, green finches, blue tits, robins and blackbirds 🥰

I've had a productive morning cleaning all the feeders and making fat balls, though they usually attract huge gangs of starlings which causes chaos.
« Last Edit: July 2, 2022, 10:42:37 am by reddebs »

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2990 on: July 2, 2022, 07:27:22 pm »
We've had the second brood Starling chicks in the garden all day. It's like a toddlers tea party where they are all squabbling over the cake.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2991 on: July 3, 2022, 02:00:39 pm »
I had one of the daft buggers actually inside the fat balls feeder the other week. I'd left the top off, didn't realise.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2992 on: July 3, 2022, 02:04:49 pm »
Went for a walk before and there was a sparrow chick sitting on the floor chirping away. Couldn't see a nest to put it back into and didn't know what to do with it, I was 3 miles away from home, so just left it alone. What should you do in a situation like that?
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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2993 on: July 3, 2022, 02:08:20 pm »
Went for a walk before and there was a sparrow chick sitting on the floor chirping away. Couldn't see a nest to put it back into and didn't know what to do with it, I was 3 miles away from home, so just left it alone. What should you do in a situation like that?
I'd have left it. A parent bird was probably nearby sourcing food for it.

I'm assuming it was fully feathered and could get about.
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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2994 on: July 3, 2022, 02:10:37 pm »
I had one of the daft buggers actually inside the fat balls feeder the other week. I'd left the top off, didn't realise.
Same for us a few years ago. The top had come off and a Starling had got in but couldn't get out again. I had to use cutters to free it.

Unless the top is totally secure on a feeder now, I won't use it.
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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2995 on: July 3, 2022, 02:11:03 pm »
Went for a walk before and there was a sparrow chick sitting on the floor chirping away. Couldn't see a nest to put it back into and didn't know what to do with it, I was 3 miles away from home, so just left it alone. What should you do in a situation like that?

Leave it Rob.  The parents will be around and bringing it food.  They get too big for the nest so almost just fall out but stay hidden in undergrowth until they're able to fly and fend for themselves. 

If it gets predated then that's just nature doing it's thing.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2996 on: July 3, 2022, 02:31:47 pm »
I'd have left it. A parent bird was probably nearby sourcing food for it.

I'm assuming it was fully feathered and could get about.

Leave it Rob.  The parents will be around and bringing it food.  They get too big for the nest so almost just fall out but stay hidden in undergrowth until they're able to fly and fend for themselves. 

If it gets predated then that's just nature doing it's thing.

Cheers both, feel better now.

Yes, the bird was fully feathered and just sitting there on the floor, it was a bit out in the open though so likely will get taken by a cat or another bird.
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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2997 on: July 3, 2022, 02:41:51 pm »
So my window bird feeder has now become a Carolina wren nest


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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2998 on: July 4, 2022, 05:16:58 pm »
 ;D Mad buggers. How open is it on the front?

I had some good viewings this morning. Two Sparrowhawks, two Buzzards and two Herons. One of them was a Sparrowhawk trying to fend off a Buzzard with a prolonged aerial assault (ballsy little fella/lady!), and one of the Herons I stopped to watch in the hopes I'd see it catch a fish, which I did within five-ten minutes, caught it on camera too, though it was only a small Roach and not the whopping great Pike that I was hoping for.

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Re: Bird watch
« Reply #2999 on: July 4, 2022, 05:24:33 pm »
;D Mad buggers. How open is it on the front?


If you look at the front where the black bar goes all the way across that's where they land and feed. Everything above that is open.