Author Topic: Steven Gerrard  (Read 4010 times)

Offline andspecks

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Steven Gerrard
« on: December 8, 2016, 02:29:22 AM »
They don't seem to be reopening the old thread so thought I'd throw this up.

Quote
Gerrard not in line for Liverpool Under-23s, but closes in on Academy role

Melissa Reddy

The Anfield legend is expected to be unveiled as a youth coach with the Reds in the new year, with his appointment in no way related to Michael Beale's exit

Steven Gerrard’s return to Liverpool will not come in the capacity of the club’s Under-23 coach, but he is due to join the Academy in January.

The 36-year-old is not being viewed as a replacement for Michael Beale, who is close to being unveiled as Sao Paulo’s assistant manager.
Instead, it is anticipated the Reds’ former captain, who called time on his playing career on November 24, will assume a floating position within the youth set-up to start with, although nothing has been signed and set in concrete yet.

Having held advanced talks with Liverpool before making his retirement announcement, Gerrard underlined his desire to learn and develop in the next phase of his career at Kirkby.

It is likely that his work with the club would dovetail with a function through the FA in England’s structures.

If Gerrard, who has been in attendance at Anfield for the 2-0 victories over Sunderland and Leeds, is to be put in charge of a team at Liverpool, it is expected he would oversee a younger age group as part of his own willingness to work his way up, as well as the Academy’s inclination to promote through the levels.

Jurgen Klopp also believes this is the correct approach. When the Reds boss was asked about Gerrard’s next move, he stated: “Maybe you can help make more English managers in England in the future if they can start working at the beginning, and not in the middle or the end.”

The Liverpool legend still has other offers to ponder, but all indications point to a return to his boyhood club in the new year.

http://www.goal.com/en-gb/news/19272/melissa-reddy/2016/12/04/30155032/gerrard-not-in-line-for-liverpool-under-23s-but-closes-in-on

Offline Medellin

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #1 on: December 8, 2016, 10:02:00 AM »
Will be great to have him back at the club.
Its news & its a good source which warrants a thread of its own on the main board as Steven Gerrard the youth coach/trainer.
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Offline gatcliffe

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #2 on: December 8, 2016, 10:04:23 AM »
Be fantastic to have him back around his beloved home.
Like a bottle of wine the reds get better and better.

Offline jeopardise

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #3 on: December 8, 2016, 11:06:59 AM »
That's a great quote from Klopp too, sums up the issue with the lack of good English managers.
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Offline redgriffin73

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #4 on: December 8, 2016, 11:37:33 AM »
That's a great quote from Klopp too, sums up the issue with the lack of good English managers.

Yep, contrast that with that ridiculous article by Robbie Savage about Ryan Giggs.
Rafa Benitez: "I'll always keep in my heart the good times I've had here, the strong and loyal support of the fans in the tough times and the love from Liverpool. I have no words to thank you enough for all these years and I am very proud to say that I was your manager. Thank you so much once more and always remember: You'll never walk alone."

Offline elsewhere

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #5 on: December 8, 2016, 12:59:00 PM »
approach from Klopp is spot on.

Offline andspecks

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2016, 05:56:56 PM »
Exclusive Steven Gerrard Q&A - My life at Liverpool, my favourite moments and why fear drove me on
The Anfield legend speaks to the ECHO after being named number one in our Liverpool Premier League 25 countdown

It's official – Steven Gerrard has been voted Liverpool 's best player of the Premier League era.

Our team of writers, and a select group of writers on fans websites, were asked to rank their favourite Reds players over the past 25 years.

Ian Doyle caught up with Gerrard to look back on his Anfield career and pick some of his best moments.

Quote
Hiya, Stevie. How are you?

Not too bad, thanks.

You've been named the best Liverpool player of the Premier League era in our special ECHO poll. Well done!

It's always flattering when you win these type of polls. This one is slightly different, but whether it's journalists or fans, when it comes down to it being judged by people who watched you in action then it's always flattering. I know how closely they'll have watched my career over the years. Whether you are first, second or third or even in the top 10 or 20 of any best Liverpool players list, you have done well. There have been so many top players over the last 25 years, so to be anywhere near the top is an honour. I'm not really one for getting too excited about individual honours, I always wanted team ones as a player but I'd happily accept the individual ones along the way. So I'd like to say thank you.

No problem. We know how much of a fan of Liverpool you are. But just how exciting was it to make your debut against Blackburn Rovers back in 1998?

It wasn't exciting – it was scary! The build-up to it was more exciting, the chance to train at Melwood and having Gerard Houllier, Phil Thompson and Sammy Lee in my ear saying I was doing well. When it actually came to the moment to get my tracksuit off when I was going on, I was aware of the clock and that moment wasn't exciting. It was terrifying! I just remember that it was almost like the precise moment I was slapped in the face and made aware of the realism of running out in front of that many people. When I look at the footage and see myself in that big red kit... I was delighted about my debut afterwards, it was my dream come true. But for those few minutes, I was terrified. The more you play, the more comfortable you get. But if I'm really, really honest, I wouldn't say I was comfortable in the first team for the first 20 or 30 games. You're really just nervous, excited and you're desperate to do so well. You want to grab every opportunity, and you don't want anybody or anything to get in your way. You don't want anyone to ruin that chance.

Then there was your first goal against Sheffield Wednesday...

That helped me massively. You come into the first team and that sets you up, and you're being put in different positions – right wing-back, right-back, holding midfield. But it was because of that run and goal that people really began to think 'he could be a more attacking player'.That was the type of goal I'd score every so often when I was coming up through the ranks. I'd do decent stuff around the opposition area and not just make tackles and passes, which is what I was getting known for in the first team. It is still one of my favourite goals, definitely in my top 10.

How did you feel when you scored it?

The feeling was up there with more important goals, the really decisive goals. What you have to realise is what when I scored that goal and ran away, basically in front of supporters only a short time earlier I'd been part of, all my heroes were diving on my back, the likes of David Thompson and Danny Murphy, players I had done my apprenticeship under. I mean this in the right way, but when you make friends as you are coming up through the ranks, you want to leave those mates behind. It's that competitive. So to score that goal was special.

What was your favourite individual performance for Liverpool?

In terms of an all-round performance over 90 minutes and extra time, the West Ham performance was my favourite. In fact, I'd say it was a perfect performance. In every other performance, no matter how well you play, you'll always make minor mistakes and have periods where things don't go well. I just think that on that one day, I was on it. It was like I was on auto-pilot, everything I was trying was coming off. It was almost like a 'wow' performance from myself, when I look back at it.

In terms of my favourite moment, you won't be surprised. Istanbul. For what it means – not just for me but for the whole club, the fans, everyone – that is always going to be number one. You only have to look at the legacy it has left. In fact, it wasn't even just about the final itself, it was about the journey. We were underdogs all the way through, and how we did it was incredible. And to share that with team-mates... it'll always be my favourite moment.

Which leads nicely on to asking about your favourite atmosphere at Anfield...

Yeah, that's an easy one too! Chelsea in the semi-final of the Champions League that season was incredible. From about an hour before kick-off, the ground was virtually full and it was bouncing. The Kop was shaking, and while that's happened on many, many times during a game, I'd never experienced it for the full warm-up, the start of the game, the middle and all the way through to the end. That night, the whole place was absolutely rocking. It's hard to look beyond that night, although I had a lot of great times at Anfield.

You played with some pretty decent players at Liverpool. Who was your favourite player to play alongside? And who was the best?

My favourite player would always have to be Carra. I always felt more secure, I felt more invincible being in front of him because I always knew what I had behind me, I knew I had a leader and, well, a mouth! Everybody knows I'm not someone who shouts much on the field, as a captain I was more of a one-to-one speaker and more one to talk at the right time. Carra, though, did love a good shout. And I always felt better when he was behind me, I felt we had a better chance of success.

In terms of who shocked me about how good they were, Fernando Torres and Luis Suarez would be my two favourites. They would often have moments where you'd think 'wow, has he really just done that?'. I used to love playing with Michael Owen because of his movement and, speaking as a midfielder, whenever he was playing in front of me then I knew I had a chance of an assist. I was a massive fan of Robbie Fowler and he was my hero when I was trying to get into the team. I played with him more towards the end of his career – his best days were before I became a regular – but it was still an honour. As a midfielder, I do love a good striker.

Usually the best players are the ones who are good on a daily basis in training, the ones who are consistent. Xabi Alonso was one such player, I knew after five minutes of his first training session that he was some player, just from his passing technique. You can tell after a few days' training who is going to make it.

So what other on-field partnerships did you enjoy?

I used to love playing with Peter Crouch at times. Crouchy set up some of my favourite goals, such as the one in the FA Cup final against West Ham. It was underestimated how much work he put into the team.

I felt I could have got the same sort of connection with Andy Carroll had he featured for us a bit longer, because I did like a striker where I can bang the ball in and maybe get a knockdown off.

There are always certain players you like to play with. You can count Dirk (Kuyt) among them. Everybody knew the job he did for the team. But he had quality and he just knew he'd be there to snatch a big goal. You look back at some of our best results and there was Dirk, popping up with the important goals.

You scored 186 goals for Liverpool, some more famous than others. But what were your best ones from a technical point of view?

Probably the last-minute one in the Cup final against West Ham and the Olympiakos goal. They were the two that when you hit them, you know you've hit them like a dream. I remember both times hitting the ball and thinking 'yeah, this one has a chance'! Another favourite was one at home against Middlesbrough from a long way out. Then there was a strike in Marseille where I cut across myself and curled one into the top corner. I liked that one. I scored one similar to that at Goodison. So there's my best five.

You've spoken about assists. Do any in particular stick in the mind?


I remember one at Fulham in 2014. I hadn't played with Daniel Sturridge very long, and one thing I'd always try to do with new strikers is set them up for a goal as soon as I could, to give us both confidence. Daniel had been with us about a year when we went to Craven Cottage. For his goal, there wasn't a lot of space between the defence and the goalkeeper, so I saw the gap and had to put a bit of check on it to make sure it didn't run off, also while hitting it with the outside of my foot. In terms of natural ability, Sturridge is up there with the rest of them. He's so sharp and can get his shot off, as we saw against Everton last week. I don't think sometimes he realises how good he is.

Another assist I enjoyed was the FA Cup final one for Djibril Cisse, partly because of the distance it travelled. If you get an assist over a long distance, it's always very satisfying.

There was also one for Torres against Newcastle when we won 3-0 in 2008, I was happy with that one.

What about a favourite penalty? You took a few in your time...

Probably the one against Arsenal in the Champions League quarter-final in 2008 at Anfield. It was late on, they'd just got back to 2-2 to go ahead on away goals, and it was in front of the Kop. That was pressure. I remember having to put that one quite high. I used to like to go low because I could get decent power in those. Sometimes, though, you have to go for the distance away from the keeper, and I managed to stick that one in. That was a good moment.

Did you have a favourite away ground?


Goodison, without doubt. I used to love the atmosphere and the pitch was always great. I would thrive off the hatred and banter. I loved watching Liverpool play there, and when I got the chance to do so I always wanted to make the most of it. We won a few there too, of course.

So you must have enjoyed beating Everton the most...

Them and Manchester United would always be in the top two. They are the ones I would be fearful of losing to. I would struggle to sleep on the night before those games, but when you won it was a great feeling.

You've mentioned fear a few times now.

Fear is something that has driven me throughout my career. The fear of missing out or the fear of losing. I suppose that goes hand in hand with the buzz of winning. You have those two extremes, and I'm someone who is aware of both.

What about your favourite manager at Liverpool? You worked under some big names.

They were all different, so that's always a difficult question for me to answer. You can have good times under certain people. They may not be your favourite person, it's just when you're at the peak in your career, so my answer to that is always Rafa. He always wanted to mould me into a type of player who was more tactically aware and the way he set up the team was perfect for me. With the people he put in the team that were around me, I always felt at my best. You can also add in the fact I was coming up to being 24 or 25 so was going into my peak years. Tactically, of course, Rafa was also world class.

To be honest, I enjoyed playing for all the managers. Kenny was one of my heroes, and I loved the football we played under Brendan Rodgers. I had good times personally under Roy Hodgson, and I felt I played well under him and it was a shame in some ways I couldn't work more with him. Plus, of course, there's a special mention to Gerard Houllier, who gave me my first start and helped me so much on and off the pitch in those early days.

If you could have one wish, would you change anything?

The run-in to the 2013-14 season.

You're back being a fan again, at least for now. What have you made of watching Liverpool this season?

I have loved it. I have loved watching them. The exciting thing for me is not so much where they are in the league, or the late derby win, although I did enjoy that. The positive thing is they should have won every single game they have played. Yes, they got some things wrong at Burnley and Bournemouth, and have dropped points elsewhere they shouldn't have. But they've always looked like they should win. And that's the most exciting thing for me. That tells me we are watching a top Liverpool team here.

Thanks Stevie.

No problem. And thanks again.

http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/sport/football/football-news/steven-gerrard-qa-life-liverpool-12367757

Offline andspecks

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #7 on: January 7, 2017, 10:26:25 PM »
Steven Gerrard went to visit an 11 year old girl Charlie, who has a rare form of brain cancer DIPG https://www.gofundme.com/2rwktaes

https://twitter.com/TOTK96/status/817830781993226240

Offline gatcliffe

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #8 on: January 7, 2017, 10:57:31 PM »
Steven Gerrard went to visit an 11 year old girl Charlie, who has a rare form of brain cancer DIPG https://www.gofundme.com/2rwktaes

https://twitter.com/TOTK96/status/817830781993226240
Class from the great man yet again long may he be associated with our great club.
Like a bottle of wine the reds get better and better.

Offline Halcyon Lissome

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #9 on: January 8, 2017, 05:39:14 PM »
Lovely stuff from Stevie. Honestly, I love Liverpool because our Legends are class...from Kenny to Stevie.  :)
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Offline stevieG786

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2017, 07:57:01 PM »
Steven Gerrard went to visit an 11 year old girl Charlie, who has a rare form of brain cancer DIPG https://www.gofundme.com/2rwktaes

https://twitter.com/TOTK96/status/817830781993226240

love

Offline MOOBS

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2017, 09:15:44 PM »
Stevie is to be honoured with the freedom of the city    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-merseyside-38554717



Seems only fitting seeing as he'd been given the freedom of Goodison park for the last 17 years
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Offline mikeb58

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2017, 03:40:54 PM »
Well deserved honour, not much chance we'll see another player in a red shirt of his ability, or to remain at the club for so long.

Add to that his charity work etc,the fella really is a legend in the true sense of the word.



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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2017, 05:41:14 AM »
Just a little tidbit from his book that will clear up an issue that puzzled many: just what happened to his shooting power and precision in his later years?


There have been two occasions where Chris helped save my career, and my sanity, when all seemed threatened or lost. In 2011 it felt like my groin and my mind were ruined for ever, blown to smithereens by pain and despair. Chris came to my rescue.
I’d had groin problems my whole career, adductor muscle pain and numerous surgeries on my hernia. My groin, and the gracilis [a small muscle in the inner thigh] release I’d needed, had cost me my place in the 2002 World Cup. It was a chronic issue and I’d already had a revision of a previous hernia procedure to reinforce the lower abdominal wall. But in March 2011 I had suffered a groin avulsion. It’s an injury that’s as nasty as it sounds because, basically, the whole of your groin muscle comes off the bone.
It happened after I did a Cruyff turn at Melwood. I managed to walk off the pitch and get to the treatment room. As soon as I hobbled in, the medical team knew I was in trouble. ‘What happened?’ Chris said, worry lining his voice.
I shook my head. ‘My groin’s just exploded.’
It was a dramatic word, but ‘exploded’ had a measure of accuracy. They soon worked out that I had pulled the adductor longus tendon off at the bone. The avulsion had occurred where my adductor muscle attaches onto my pubic symphysis area.
Your adductor muscle primarily helps when you swing your leg across your body. It is possible for such an injury to heal itself because it can form a new attachment lower down. Some footballers actually play with a half-attached adductor and they get assigned a secondary cleft – a little gap which helps them manage their movements. But as soon as I heard from the surgeon that, if we followed that non-interventionist approach, I could lose power when making a trademark crossfield pass, I was adamant. I wanted surgery. If all went well, the surgeon assured me, the adductor muscle would feel as good as new.
I was happy to take his advice and he also reassured me that Frank Lampard had come back from the same injury. I would be out for twelve weeks but I would make a complete recovery. It ended my season but Chris said he would come out to Portugal with me in the summer. I would be ready to play again long before the start of the 2011–12 season.
It was vital to have a strong core around the groin and adductor area because, in a typical Premier League game, I would run eight miles and a mile of that distance would be covered at high speed. There was always plenty of twisting and turning of the groin and the adductor. Some players believed that massage was the key to everything but our medical team had a strong belief that active rehabilitation, strengthening and hard work were essential in ensuring that the surgery was successful.
I nodded. After the surgery I would be ready to put in as much hard work as we needed.
The operation seemed routine and it left me with a neat four-inch scar. It was another to add to the collection. But we soon hit a problem. I kept suffering from discomfort and, sometimes, pain in and around my pelvis. Chris, the Liverpool doctors Zaf Iqbal and Peter Brukner and the surgeon Ernest Schilders all examined me – and gave the all-clear. It was still early days. I just needed to relax and allow the adductor to heal.
We thought some sun would sort me out. I was longing to get to Portugal and feel back to normal again. Alex, the girls and I went out for our summer break – and Chris took a working holiday with us. We would go to the gym in the morning and evenings to work hard and he would leave me to enjoy my holiday with the family the rest of the time.
It was frustrating. We kept needing to pull back in terms of our targets for the first of July – the day I hoped to start preseason training. Anything as simple as a high knee-step or a lunge would hurt too much. They were the basic exercises we needed to strengthen the adductor.
We devised a new plan that we would pick up the pace at Melwood. I would, surely, be fully rested and recovered by then.

The plan went awry. On my first day back at Melwood, after we’d done some lengthy but gentle warm-up routines, we decided I would go for a little jog. I knew I couldn’t kick a ball but, surely, I could manage a ten-minute jog around the training fields. I had made some progress in the pool and on the alter-g, a weight-bearing treadmill which enables you to jog without placing any stress on your body.
I was looking forward to it, the simple mindless pleasure of being outside and moving one foot in front of the other at a steady pace. I had not run for a very long time.
My feet began to move. One, two, three … and by the time I had taken my ninth and tenth step I had to stop. My face was a mask of pain.
I could not run another step. It was excruciating; and it was frightening.
What was going on? I was a professional footballer and I couldn’t even run ten paces. My operation had been twelve weeks earlier. I was meant to be fit and flying by now.
It was obvious that the medics were also concerned. Part of their job was to study the clinical side and then pinpoint the reasons a player might be feeling pain. Such explanations always helped ease the stress and the worry. But they were not sure what to tell me. All the tests the doctors had since run showed that the surgery had been successful. Yet I still felt completely crippled.
They had explained years earlier that I picked up more injuries than many players because I was hyper-mobile. That meant I had real flexibility around my joints. It was great in the sense that flexibility helped my football. The downside was I was also more susceptible to injury. But my latest injury had apparently been resolved by surgery.
Chris and the doctors studied a new set of scans. They went through each of them in detail with me. They showed me that, when I tore off the adductor, I had also stripped away the ligament underneath the pubic symphysis. That explained why my movement was hampered and it perhaps indicated some instability. It was suggested that the gapping in my pelvic area was causing the pain. There was not much we could do about it except wait for the ligament to heal properly.
A week later, feeling a little better, we had a meeting with all the medics and it was decided I’d avoid running for a while. I’d switch to cycling.
Melwood felt very empty, with the first-team squad away on a preseason tour, but Darren Burgess, the club’s head fitness coach, soon called me. He asked me to do a twenty-four-minute bike ride. ‘Do this one for a physical hit,’ Darren said, ‘and let me know how you get on.’
The plan was to build on that first real test on the bike. Jordan Milsom, a good friend of mine and a top fitness coach, would be there to monitor me and the readings. I climbed on the bike and I began to pedal.
Wow, it was so painful. After two or three minutes, with sweat already beading my brow, and my face stretched into the wrinkly grimace of a very old man, it felt like I was having to ride all the way from Liverpool to the Trafford Centre in Manchester while sitting on a saddle of nails. That’s how agonizing it felt.
After five minutes I gave up. I had to stop. I surrendered.
I left a message on Darren’s voicemail. ‘You cannot put me through that again,’ I said. ‘Something’s not right. It feels serious.’
I was getting lower and lower. ‘It’s not feeling good,’ I told Jordan and Chris. ‘It’s excruciating.’
‘Where exactly are you feeling the pain?’ Jordan asked.
‘Sort of behind the balls,’ I said.
They looked worried.
‘Yeah,’ I said, ‘it feels like someone is trying to knife me behind the balls.’
We didn’t laugh. I was beginning to wonder if I would ever be able to kick a ball again. It had been almost four months since my fateful Cruyff turn. At this stage
I was meant to be ready for a full-scale game. But my body had given up.
The pain was sporadic. I could go for hours feeling fine and then it would suddenly knife me when I was doing something as simple as getting in or out of my car.
‘It sounds like the pain is being caused when you open up the pelvis,’ Chris suggested.
‘Could be,’ I said. ‘There’s something going on between my privates and the middle. There’s something underneath my pelvis. It feels like my pelvis is opening. It’s like a great big gapping.’
Zaf Iqbal and Chris took me back to the surgeon, Ernest Schilders, who had done the operation at the Yorkshire Clinic near Bradford. Schilders was a fine surgeon, from Belgium, whom the club had relied on for years as our hip and groin specialist. I trusted him and I was even more worried when he could not identify any reason for the stabbing pain. We told him about the aborted jog, and the abandoned bike ride. Schilders looked bemused. He again said that he was completely confident the surgery had been successful. Schilders thought we needed a fresh pair of eyes. He suggested I see a pelvic specialist down in London.
It was sounding more and more serious. I couldn’t jog. I couldn’t ride a bike. I couldn’t kick a ball. And there was no chance I could jump up in the air and head it. I wasn’t able to do much at all.
Zaf, Chris and I travelled down by train to London. I had plenty of time to talk to them. They tried to keep my spirits up but we all knew that there was a real danger I might not improve. We had to face the possibility that, over fourteen years as a first-team player, so much damage had been done around the joint that the whole pelvis had been made unstable. Without a supporting structure I was finished as a hyper-mobile player, and probably as any sort of player. As soon as I tried even the most basic movements my whole pelvis felt like it was shearing.
Zaf and Chris encouraged me. Maybe the pelvic surgeon would come up with a simple solution. Perhaps it would be possible to pin the pelvis?
I shuddered when it was explained that it would be similar to putting a bolt through the joint.
Terrific. I didn’t feel good as we met our latest specialist, the pelvic guy, and I waited to hear if he was about to tell me it really was all over. He was very thorough and, after a long examination, he went back to the scan taken that morning.
‘Look here,’ he said, pointing to a shadowy smudge. ‘You’ve got all of this white fluid here. I don’t know how much fluid you should have after this procedure because it’s not one that I do. But you need to find out what’s going on with this fluid. You’d better go back to Schilders.’
We were going round in circles. But, on the train journey back to Liverpool, Doc Iqbal explained that a build-up of fluid usually indicated an infection. It was confusing as he had already carried out a full battery of blood tests for infection. The clearest sign of an infection is a high white blood-cell count and mine had remained normal throughout the long haul. Maybe Schilders would have a brainwave.
An appointment back in Bradford was arranged with Schilders for later that week. Zaf and Chris asked me to rest up as much as possible at home.
The body works in miraculous ways and maybe it decided that my poor old heart and brain had ached enough. It began to do something very strange. The next day, at home, my wound opened a little. It seeped out white, yellowy, gunky pus.
A clean, perfectly stitched scar opened up – less like a flower than a nasty weed with white and yellow buds on the top. What the fuck was going on now? I found a cotton wool pad and dabbed it clean. More gunk began to ooze out.
I was so scared of what I saw I took a photo of my wound. I was having a serious panic. I sent the image to Chris with a message:
What the fuck is this?
Chris texted back:
This is v good. Will call in 2 mins. This means it really is an infection.
I messaged him –
That’s good?!?
– after sending another photographic update.
Chris called me. I told him that I’d just had to use another pad to clear the next hit of pus.
‘It’s great news, Stevie,’ Chris enthused. I must have grunted dubiously because he quickly explained that my pain had almost certainly been caused by the pus pushing the joint apart. It also caused the sensation of instability in my pelvis. We had been worried that something had become seriously unhinged in the pelvic area. But, instead, the build-up of fluid had caused immense pressure on the joint and essentially forced it apart. No wonder it had felt unstable.
Chris got me back to Bradford quickly to see Schilders and have a repeat MRI scan. It was clear as day, they said, after they had examined the scan. They could see the build-up of pus jammed right between the joint and my pubic symphysis. The apparently normal post-op fluid was probably a raging infection which, bizarrely, hadn’t been picked up by any of the tests.
I began to understand. No wonder it had felt as if I was being stabbed in the bollocks.
While we waited for them to run a test on the pus, to confirm it was the infection they all suspected, Chris took me for a coffee in Shipley, on the edge of Bradford. He was fired up. ‘We need this to be an infection,’ he told me. ‘If this is an infection you’ll be fine. You’ll be sorted.’
I was suddenly desperate. I wanted to be infected. I was praying silently for an infection.
An hour later the results were in and there was absolute confirmation. I was infected. I felt like punching the air. What a result!
Schilders smiled. He understood. He was also relieved. There had been a 1 in 10,000 chance of picking up an infection during surgery. I got the one – and it explained everything. But it was all right. I would go into the Spire, a hospital in Liverpool, and spend a week recovering. They would pump me full of antibiotics and kill off the infection.
There was a chance I would be playing again in late September 2011, early October at the latest. I could not stop smiling as I headed off to hospital for a week.
I had no idea then I would soon feel far lower than I’d ever done before. Yet another mysterious injury, and a deep depression, loomed over me. The worst was on its way.
At first there was only good news. In hospital my pain diminished rapidly. The pus had been drained away and I felt a noticeable improvement in my movement every day. My recovery had begun.
Within a week of getting home I was back at Melwood. I was able to jog freely a few days later. I could ride a bike without pain. I could soon run. I could jump. I could kick a ball. It was a beautiful feeling.
I was still nervous. I had been out for six months and had lost confidence in my body. I wasn’t sure if my groin and pelvis would stand up to the rigours of training. But within a few days I felt like my old self again. I felt normal, at last.
I made my comeback on 21 September 2011.


Excerpt from Gerrard: My Story
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

I'm sure most of us have read his book, for the few that haven't, there you go. Obviously not so much the infection, but it's quite clear the original groin avulsion in 2011 pretty much killed the Gerrard thunderbolt, whether mechanically or through the player's conscious decision to never go full blast again.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2017, 05:45:08 AM by surfer. Fuck you generator. »

Offline andspecks

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #14 on: February 1, 2017, 10:26:37 PM »

Offline God's Left Peg

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Offline Keith Lard

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #16 on: February 2, 2017, 06:55:22 PM »
Awesome :) they are gonna be some inspired kids

Also hopefully means Stevie will calm down on his recent media gabbing
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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #17 on: February 2, 2017, 07:34:26 PM »
Hopefully Stevie will be able to work under the radar for some time, he needs to learn his trade bit by bit to become what we all think he could be: a top class manager.

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #18 on: February 2, 2017, 08:34:57 PM »
Hopefully Stevie will be able to work under the radar for some time, he needs to learn his trade bit by bit to become what we all think he could be: a top class manager.

yes ... hopefully in 20 years after Klopp has dominated Europe for 2 decades, won us at least 5 european cups and 10 league titles.
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Offline andspecks

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #19 on: February 2, 2017, 10:48:11 PM »
Awesome :) they are gonna be some inspired kids

Also hopefully means Stevie will calm down on his recent media gabbing
He's employed to be a pundit... what do you expect

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #20 on: March 4, 2017, 01:51:17 PM »
Steven Gerrard did the half-time team talk as LFC U18s secure impressive win over Manchester City
http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/sport/football/football-news/liverpool-news-transfer-rumours-live-12680770



Offline Anfield89

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #21 on: March 25, 2017, 10:28:29 PM »
Great to see today but I do seriously hope there's a proper support team set up by our club and other clubs to help players deal with life not playing.

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #22 on: March 27, 2017, 04:42:56 AM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zlhf2-9BW4

Steven Gerrard vs Real Madrid Legends (H) 16/17

Offline wemmick

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #23 on: March 28, 2017, 04:15:41 PM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zlhf2-9BW4

Steven Gerrard vs Real Madrid Legends (H) 16/17

Still more skilled than 90% of the players in the PL. Blessed to have seen him play for so many years.

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #24 on: March 30, 2017, 09:22:52 PM »
Great to see today but I do seriously hope there's a proper support team set up by our club and other clubs to help players deal with life not playing.
:lmao
At last the TRUTH 26th April 2016

Still don't buy the s*n.

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2017, 10:20:10 PM »

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #26 on: April 27, 2017, 10:47:43 PM »
It’s only football and it means nothing.
It’s only  football and it means everything.

I’m one of those “out of town” TV–watching LFC fans and I’ve never been to Anfield.
I’ve never been to Anfield but I fucking love Liverpool, ever since I watched Dalglish as player manager as a kid.
Since watching the ’86 cup final as a 9 year old and being in tears at half time cos Lineker had put Everton ahead and my uncle wouldn’t shut up about how superior Everton had been.

Dalglish eventually went and then as an adult every game, every time we were struggling, time after time one man stood up and said NO on behalf of all of us, on behalf of the fans. He was what I wanted to be, everything I admired and reflected the qualities I admire in people, in life, not just in football.
Integrity, resilience, humility and work ethic.
Time after time one word brought hope, joy and amazement.

GERRARD.

Steven Gerrard I’d watched him on MOTD, on shit streams, I’d read match reports, sought out interviews, followed every move. Screamed at him as he willed Liverpool the team, the city on and embodied it’s fucking ethos .

Gerrard after THAT first half. Willed us on. Even through the telly the passion and the dedication was palpable from Istanbul. I kicked every ball with him and lost my mind when he lifted the cup that BELONGS in his hands. Belongs there because of our pedigree, belongs there because at his peak he was the best player in his position in the world, belonged there because somewhere, somehow that LFC commentator is still screaming “it’s wonderful, it’s marvellous it’s three three!!!!” as Xavi nets the penalty Stevie won and I still can’t believe it and Gerrard made it possible despite us being overrun, in the face of one of the best ever Milan sides AND in spite of Djimi Traore.

Then finally, as a birthday present my wife got me a ticket for Liverpool vs Fulham. It’s Wednesday 12th 2014 and there’s a tube strike which means I worry for a bit about whether I can get there on time from work. The seat is at the end of the Fulham fans bit next to the away end.
I take my seat and tell myself to sit on my hands cos I’m with the wrong set of fans.

It starts.
Toure’s own goal, Gerrard’s ridiculous pass to Sturridge for the goal and Suarez’s mad flick round the corner that won’t even make sense when I watch it back at home later after the match.

Then it happens.
Final minute.
Penalty.
Gerrard steps up. Expert at the dead ball situation like Xavi. Here we go...

I’m still in a suit from work, I’m a grown man in my late thirties with a son at home.

Except I’m not. The penalty is near the corner of the ground where I am.

I start to pray and I’m a fucking nine year old in bits.

“COMEONSTEVIECOMEONSTEVIECOMEONSTEVIECOMEONSTEVIECOMEONSTEVIECOMEONSTEVIE COMEONSTEVIECOMEONSTEVIECOMEONSTEVIECOMEONSTEVIECOMEONSTEVIECOMEONSTEVIE!”.

I lean forward in expectation. he hits it. Pandemonium. Joy. Explosion.The away end, sounding like a primeval marauding, terrifying demented horde, goes insane
“NOW YOU’RE GONNA BELIEVE US AND NOW YOU'RE GONNA BELIEVE US!!!!”.
I do.
I am.
I will.

I’m in shock. I’ve never seen or heard anything like it and I’m screaming my head off surrounded by Fulham fans.

Stevie’s turned into wolverine and it’s fucking glorious.

It’s football and it means nothing.

It’s football and it means everything.

I’m nearly 40 and I’m leaving the stadium tears.

It’s ridiculous and it’s glorious at the same time.

Gerrard

LFC

The travelling Kop. What a fucking noise.

You’ll Never Walk Alone.

Thank you Stevie.

Offline The Final Third

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #27 on: April 28, 2017, 12:25:57 AM »
Steven Gerrard: ‘There’s a showboating mentality in academies. My teams will be physical’

by Andy Hunter

The former Liverpool captain talks about his new role as coach of the club’s under-18s, why young players should not try to emulate Cristiano Ronaldo and why he turned down the MK Dons job

Steven Gerrard insists judgment should be reserved on his attributes as a coach until his tactical decisions, his leadership from the sidelines and his mistakes have been thoroughly examined. That will come next season as manager of Liverpool Under-18s, where judgment on what is required has already been made. “There is a showboating mentality through academies,” claims Gerrard. “My teams will be physical.”
Steven Gerrard: 'I thought I was a bit young to be Liverpool's captain at 23'
Read more

The first of what Gerrard hopes will be several managerial steps at Liverpool was confirmed on Thursday with a fixed role with the under-18s. The current under‑18s manager, Neil Critchley, will lead the under-23s next season, with Mike Garrity – who has been in the post since Michael Beale moved to São Paulo in December – becoming part of Critchley’s backroom team. Both have been shadowed by the former Liverpool and England captain since he returned to the club in February.

The academy director, Alex Inglethorpe, made the appointments in consultation with Jürgen Klopp, who has been closely involved in Gerrard’s transition from star captain to coach of starry-eyed youngsters. “Jürgen’s been the key behind all this,” acknowledges the 36-year-old, who will be assisted by the current under-13s coach, Tom Culshaw, and the rehab fitness coach Jordan Milsom. It was the Liverpool manager’s idea to give Gerrard an initial floating role across all academy age groups and, impressed by the hours and the work put in, considers the fledgling coach ready for the next, more challenging step.

Gerrard explains: “I spoke to Jürgen and we agreed after a few chats that the 18s was the right age group because it still gives you a bit of a spotlight with the coverage it gets but it is a place where you can make a lot of mistakes and grow and learn. Every manager and coach I have spoken to has said I will make loads of mistakes, and your first job is better to be away from the cameras. The other offers I got [managing MK Dons], it would have been learning on the job at the deep end and I probably wasn’t ready for those jobs. I might have been but I didn’t want to take any risks, especially when there is no timescale or plan of where I want to be in a certain time, so the 18s made sense.

“It has been really good so far. I have been shadowing five or six coaches at the academy and been mentored by Steve Heighway and Alex as well. I am still waiting to start in terms of being a No1 coach that leads a team. Shadowing is a bit different, I am more in the background. I haven’t had to make any big decisions, or any substitutions, formations or tactics yet.”

Shadowing has not contained Gerrard’s influence entirely, however. The former midfielder was immediately struck by the lack of physicality at academy level, a frequent lament from many Premier League managers while the Football Association strives to improve the technical abilities of English talent. In an under-18s fixture against Manchester City in March, he called for – and received – greater intensity from the Liverpool players as City were beaten for the first time in 28 months. Gerrard demanded the same the following week against Manchester United – old habits and rivalries die hard – and the 2-2 draw proved a ferocious encounter. Adam Lewis, a lifelong Liverpool fan who idolises Gerrard, was sent off after 30 minutes for a dangerous tackle.

“We work on 50-50s,” Gerrard jokes. “As a player I got many, many tackles wrong and went over the top a few times and I had to apologise. That is not something I want to put into young players at all but you have to prepare them for the top level and the top level is physical and demanding. It is not just about tackles and competing. It is about trying to prepare them for the last five or 10 minutes of games when it is hard and your legs are burning and your heart is burning and it is not a nice place to be in as a player. You have to get them to be mentally strong to be prepared for that. I hate watching footballers and football when there is no physical side and you don’t compete.

There is a showboating mentality through academies. A lot of kids think they have to do 10 lollipops or Cruyff turns to look good or stand out. We all love a bit of skill and talent but the other side of the game is huge. I have to try and prepare these players for careers in the game. Not all of them will play for Liverpool’s first team but I feel if I can help them to compete in the other side of the game it will help their careers. Maybe it [showboating] comes from computer games, I don’t know. There are a lot of skillful players that young players try and emulate – probably too much instead of playing to their own strengths. They try and model their game on players like Ronaldo whereas you have to look at yourself and say: ‘What have I got? What are my strengths? How can I improve my weaknesses and become a player in my own right?’”

Gerrard, who expects to complete his Uefa A licence by the end of this season, continues: “I like streetwise footballers. I think all the top players come from the street, that type of player. The kids in our academy are coming into an unbelievable place to work, they are getting boss food, they are getting picked up and the full-time lads get a lot more money than we got when we started. There is a case that they get a bit too much too soon. They get into a comfort zone of working in a lovely place and then it is a big shock for them when they have to move on or get released. I’ve seen a lot of players come out of the academy with huge reputations and go into the Melwood dressing room. Then it is sink or swim and a lot of them sink.”

The intensity of Liverpool youth fixtures is not all that has changed since Gerrard returned from LA Galaxy. He himself has had to tailor his coaching methods under the tutelage of the club’s academy director. Gerrard explains: “Alex has been first-class and I’ve had a lot of feedback. He’s been honest and straight with me. He has spoken to me about my body language on the side in coaching sessions. He also talked to me about my coaching voice. He wants it to be the same as it was when I was a player, when I was captain.”


Unsurprisingly, Gerrard has found aspiring youngsters to be “a bit shy” in the presence of Liverpool’s commanding former captain. “But once they know you are approachable they get comfortable very quickly,” he says. “We have to wait and see [what his strengths are as a coach] but you have to be approachable. The best managers I worked with were all very approachable, honest and fair, and always gave me feedback whether it was positive or negative.”

There is a danger, of course, that a coach of Gerrard’s status will be measured by the immediacy of results at under-18 level and not on player development. He accepts it comes with, if not the job, then his decision to pursue a career in management when so many of his peers have kept away. “None of that worries me or scares me,” he says. “If it is my fault we get beat that’s fine. It’s about the players and their development.

I’d love to see a player I coach make their first-team debut because it is a life-changer. Making your debut for a club this size changed my life and I’ll be pleased for that kid and his family because it is an unbelievable thing to do. Making my debut here was one of the best days of my life. But they will have to fight for it because it is not easy.”



As always very circumspect but forthright views by Stevie. Will be interesting to see how he bridges player development with the more tactical aspects of management.

Offline Keith Lard

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2017, 09:40:54 PM »
Can you imagine Stevie in his pomp playing for Klopp? Damn, that would have  been a marriage made in heaven.

 So happy we at least have  Stevie as part of our coaching set up -  so looking forward to seeing his influence show itself on our kids coming through the academy
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Offline Leosheer

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #29 on: May 17, 2017, 01:34:57 PM »
I've just seen that Carrick's contract is to be extended. I know he didn't want to do that, but do those of you who watched Stevie in the US think he COULD have played on for an year or two, albeit it in a more limited role (coming of bench etc)?

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #30 on: May 17, 2017, 04:35:08 PM »
I've just seen that Carrick's contract is to be extended. I know he didn't want to do that, but do those of you who watched Stevie in the US think he COULD have played on for an year or two, albeit it in a more limited role (coming of bench etc)?
The whole point of him leaving was that he wasn't prepared to be a bench player and wanted to start - which I personally never understood, but I've never been the best player at our club so it might have something to do with his pride.
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I've got a feeling that Origi is the real deal, from a couple of games I watched but mainly his interviews there seems to be something about him.

Offline andspecks

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Re: Steven Gerrard
« Reply #31 on: May 20, 2017, 02:51:41 AM »
I've just seen that Carrick's contract is to be extended. I know he didn't want to do that, but do those of you who watched Stevie in the US think he COULD have played on for an year or two, albeit it in a more limited role (coming of bench etc)?
His biggest problem in the end came down to injuries. He couldn't really stay fit for a substantial amount of time.