Author Topic: The F*cking Liar & Deranged Animal.  (Read 1062087 times)

Online Laughter is the best medicine...

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23800 on: March 17, 2017, 11:47:10 PM »
It's Donald Drumpf. He retweeted a Mussolini quote and didn't give a fuck when he was asked about it. "lt is a good quote..." was his reply...
Not as bad as this one

Offline Red Beret

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23801 on: March 17, 2017, 11:51:28 PM »
George Takei:

Of course [Trump] has micro waves. Look at those small hands.
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Offline rodderzzz

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23802 on: March 18, 2017, 12:05:41 AM »
No, he really doesn't. He believes that they're laughing at his impromptu comedic genius.

I think they are laughing at the quip, sadly

Offline GreatEx

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23803 on: March 18, 2017, 12:14:03 AM »
Some have said they laugh at the face Merkel makes off camera in response to what Trump says.  ;D

That is clearly what happened - no reaction to Trump, Merkel then puts on an incredulous face and there's a bit of a titter, then she gives him a classic "WTF is this guy on?" glance and they burst into laughter. Then Trump smirks and nods, thinking, "yeah, you know what I'm sayin'". Stupid c*nt got burned and he doesn't even know it. No doubt he will dismiss such notions as fake news: I tell the best jokes, a million people roared with laughter when I came up with that one, it was tremendous.

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23804 on: March 18, 2017, 12:26:15 AM »
So today Trump met the leader of the free world.

Offline coolbyrne

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23805 on: March 18, 2017, 01:09:33 AM »
I know that to ask is futile, but does this c*nt realise that this is not a game?

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/video/2017/mar/17/donald-trump-angela-merkel-no-handshake-video

I don't think he shook Theresa May's hand, did he? This is gonna sound weird, but he's got that creepy grab-and-pull/yank alpha male handshake; does he know how to shake a woman's hand?
Oh, these sour times.

If I ever see you in person I'm going to knock you the fuck out you prick.

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23806 on: March 18, 2017, 01:57:31 AM »
I don't think he shook Theresa May's hand, did he? This is gonna sound weird, but he's got that creepy grab-and-pull/yank alpha male handshake; does he know how to shake a woman's hand?



aside from when she had to rescue him from that ledge of course
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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23807 on: March 18, 2017, 02:32:41 AM »

So today Trump met the leader of the free world.


Ironically she grew up in East Germany with the Stasi wire tapping poets.
 
« Last Edit: March 18, 2017, 02:34:37 AM by Giono »
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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23808 on: March 18, 2017, 02:39:52 AM »
SPECIAL REPORT-Russian elite invested nearly $100 million in Trump buildings, records show

Reuters
Nathan Layne, Ned Parker, Svetlana Reiter, Stephen Grey and Ryan McNeill
6 hrs ago

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Donald J. Trump downplayed his business ties with Russia. And since taking office as president, he has been even more emphatic.

“I can tell you, speaking for myself, I own nothing in Russia,” President Trump said at a news conference last month. “I have no loans in Russia. I don’t have any deals in Russia."

But in the United States, members of the Russian elite have invested in Trump buildings. A Reuters review has found that at least 63 individuals with Russian passports or addresses have bought at least $98.4 million worth of property in seven Trump-branded luxury towers in southern Florida, according to public documents, interviews and corporate records.

The buyers include politically connected businessmen, such as a former executive in a Moscow-based state-run construction firm that works on military and intelligence facilities, the founder of a St. Petersburg investment bank and the co-founder of a conglomerate with interests in banking, property and electronics.

People from the second and third tiers of Russian power have invested in the Trump buildings as well. One recently posted a photo of himself with the leader of a Russian motorcycle gang that was sanctioned by the United States for its alleged role in Moscow’s seizure of Crimea.

The Reuters review of investors from Russia in Trump’s Florida condominium buildings found no suggestion of wrongdoing by President Trump or his real estate organization. And none of the buyers appear to be from Putin’s inner circle.

The White House referred questions from Reuters to the Trump Organization, whose chief legal officer said the scrutiny of President Trump’s business ties with Russia was misplaced.

“I can say definitively that this is an overblown story that is media-created,” Alan Garten said in an interview. “I’ve been around this company and know the company’s dealings."

The tally of investors from Russia may be conservative. The analysis found that at least 703 – or about one-third – of the owners of the 2044 units in the seven Trump buildings are limited liability companies, or LLCs, which have the ability to hide the identity of a property’s true owner.

And the nationality of many buyers could not be determined. Russian-Americans who did not use a Russian address or passport in their purchases were not included in the tally.

SUNNY ISLES
The review focused on Florida because the state has a large concentration of Trump-branded buildings, and determining the ownership of properties is easier there than in some other states. The resort town of Sunny Isles Beach, site of six of the seven Trump-branded Florida residential towers, stands out in another way: The zip code that includes the Sunny Isles buildings has an estimated 1,200 Russian-born residents, among the most in the country, U.S. Census data show.

The Trump organization advertises all seven Florida buildings on its website as it pursues similar branding deals around the world. Exactly how much income Trump has earned from the buildings is unclear.

Six of the seven properties were the product of an agreement the New York property magnate struck in 2001 with father-and-son American developers Michael and Gil Dezer. The six buildings operated by the Dezers in Sunny Isles would bear Trump’s name under a licensing agreement.

In an interview, Gil Dezer said the project generated $2 billion in initial sales, from which Trump took a commission. Dezer declined to say how large a commission, citing confidentiality agreements. Garten, the Trump Organization’s chief legal officer, said Trump’s income was a mix of flat fees and percentages but declined to disclose them.

Edgardo Defortuna, a leading Miami developer, estimated that Trump likely made between one percent and four percent in initial sale commissions, based on the standard fees paid on similarly branded projects. If so, Trump stood to reap a total of $20 million to $80 million in Sunny Isles.

Trump receives no commission on subsequent sales in all seven of the Florida residential towers.

He continues to make money from one of the six Sunny Isles buildings, however, according to disclosure forms Trump filed in the 2016 U.S. presidential race. The disclosure form states that Trump received between $100,000 and $1 million from a business called Trump Marks Sunny Isles I LLC. Dezer said these funds came from the Trump International Beach Resort, a hotel and condominium complex.

Trump reported no income on his disclosure form from his seventh Florida property, the Trump Hollywood in the city of Hollywood. How much he has made over the years from that property’s 200 units is unclear. BH3, an investment fund which took over 180 units in a foreclosure sale, paid Trump a licensing fee of $25,000 for each unit, according to Daniel Lebensohn, a principal at the fund. If the remaining 20 units generated the same fee, Trump’s take would have been $5 million. Garten declined to confirm Trump’s commission.

Informed of the Reuters analysis of Trump’s Russian condo investors, two Democratic opponents of the president, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), renewed their calls for greater disclosure of his finances.

“While the president has denied having invested in Russia, he has said little or nothing about Russian investment in his businesses and properties in the United States or elsewhere,” said Rep. Adam Schiff, ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee. “This should concern all Americans and is yet another reason why his refusal to release his tax returns should be met with considerable skepticism and concern.”

Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC) and Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), the Republican chairs of the Senate and House intelligence committees, declined to comment.

Schiff, as well as two U.S. intelligence officials and one former senior law enforcement official who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the Russian government sometimes directs funding at prominent individuals in the United States and Europe in hopes of improving their perception of Russia. Reuters found no evidence of such an effort with Trump. Garten, the Trump Organization’s chief legal officer, scoffed at the idea.

“This is politics at its worst,” he said.

RUSSIAN ELITE
The glimpse inside the condominium dealings offers a look at how the wealthy in Putin’s Russia use foreign property to stow cash.

One wealthy Russian buyer was Alexander Yuzvik. In 2010, he and his wife bought unit 3901 of Trump Palace in Sunny Isles for $1.3 million, according to Florida property records. The three-bedroom apartment has 2,100 square feet and panoramic views, according to an online real estate listing.

From 2013 to 2016, Yuzvik was a senior executive at Spetstroi, a state-owned company that has carried out construction projects at military facilities.

The Spetstroi website says the firm was involved in construction projects at the Moscow training academy of the FSB, Russia’s primary civilian intelligence service and successor of the KGB. Spetstroi also did construction work in the administrative building of the general staff of the GRU, Russia’s military intelligence service.

In a statement sent to Reuters, Spetstroi said Yuzvik worked there until he stepped down in March 2016.

Employees of some state-owned Russian companies are typically required to disclose their assets and income. Yuzvik and his wife filed a declaration for 2013. In that declaration, which is publicly available, they list only assets inside Russia. The Florida condo isn’t included.
Yuzvik could not be reached for comment.

Andrey Truskov, another Trump condo owner, is a founder and co-owner of Absolute Group LLC, a holding company involved in wholesale electronics, banking and property development, with projects in Moscow, London and New York. The wholesale electronic business is the biggest in Russia, an Absolute representative told Reuters. The company does not disclose its financial results.

Truskov bought apartment 1102 in the Trump Hollywood building for $1.4 million in 2011. The three-bedroom, 3.5-bath unit is 3,100 square feet, according to online real estate listings.

In a telephone interview, Truskov confirmed that he purchased the Trump Hollywood unit. He said the Florida apartment was the same price as a three-room apartment outside Moscow at the time, and Florida was a nice place to have a property. He said the purchase was a personal decision that had no connection with his business.

Several wealthy buyers were from Moscow and St. Petersburg, the country’s two largest cities, according to interviews in Russia, Florida public records and the Bureau Van Dijk company database Orbis. Among them: Alexey Ustaev, the founder and president of St. Petersburg-based Viking Bank, one of the first private investment banks established in Russia after the fall of Communism.

A donor to orphanages and chess clubs in St. Petersburg, Ustaev has received awards from the Russian Sports Ministry and the St. Petersburg chamber of commerce for his banking and charitable work, according to his biography on the bank’s website.

PROVINCIAL POWERS
In 2009, Ustaev bought unit 5006, a 3-bed, 3.5-bath apartment in the Trump Palace complex in Sunny Isles, for $1.2 million in cash, according to Florida public records. Two years later, Ustaev bought another apartment, a penthouse unit, this time in the nearby Trump Royale condominium development, for $5.2 million.

In an email reply to questions, Ustaev said he purchased the properties in the Trump buildings for private use, but declined to comment on his family’s U.S. business. “I am living in Russia, I am working in Russia, and going abroad only for business purposes or vacations,” he said.

Many of the Russian buyers were from the country’s provinces. One is Oleg Misevra, a wealthy coal magnate and former traffic police commander whose company’s main assets are in the Pacific island of Sakhalin in Russia’s Far East. He has caught Putin’s eye: At a 2010 regional meeting of Putin’s United Russia party, Putin praised Misevra’s work and held a lengthy question and answer session with him.


A corporation Misevra controls, Swiss Residence Aliance Inc, purchased Penthouse #1 in Trump Hollywood for $6.8 million in 2010. The six-bedroom duplex is 8,200 square feet and boasts 12-foot ceilings, according to real estate listings. Misevra did not respond to requests for comment.

Some of these Russian buyers appear to have done well in America. Another local politician, Vadim Valeryevich Gataullin, bought an apartment for $3.5 million in the Trump Hollywood. He did the deal through a company registered in Florida called VVG Real Estate Investments LLC. Five years later, Gataullin sold the apartment for $4.1 million to a Delaware-based limited liability company whose owner is not identified in state records.

In early 2012, Gataullin bought a second apartment in the same building, unit 2701, for $920,000

Gataullin is from the semi-autonomous Russian Republic of Bashkortostan, an oil-producing region in the foothills of the Ural Mountains. The son of a deputy regional prosecutor, he was a deputy in the regional parliament from 2013 until 2015.

As a member of the regional parliament, he was required to declare his income and assets under Russian federal law, according to a representative of the Bashkortostan regional parliament. A copy of the income declaration Gataullin filed for in 2013, when he was still owner of the second Trump unit, contains no mention of the apartment.

Gataullin did not respond to messages sent to his company in Bashkortostan.

FRIEND OF A BIKER
More recently, Gataullin has been actively investing in the Miami area. His VVG Real Estate has spent at least $28 million on property in Broward County between 2012 and 2016. It also bought and sold six properties in Miami Dade County between 2015 and 2016 for a total profit of $238,400, property records show.

VVG is also the registered licensee on a small motel close to the beach in Hollywood. An employee there told Reuters that Gataullin “appears and disappears like a ghost” and was currently in Russia. A secretary at Gataullin’s holding company in Russia told Reuters on March 17 that he is not in Russia.
The American experience has been a mixed one for some of the Trump buyers. Among them is Pavel Uglanov, a businessman who served as a deputy minister for industry and energy in the regional government of Saratov, in central Russia, from 2010 to 2011.

Uglanov bought unit 3704 of Trump Hollywood in Hollywood, Florida, for $1.8 million in 2012. He sold the 3-bed, 3,395 square foot apartment for $2.9 million two years later.

Back in Russia, Uglanov made unsuccessful runs for the Saratov city assembly in 2006 and 2011, the second time as a member of Putin’s United Russia party. After leaving his deputy ministership in 2011, Uglanov told his then-wife, Anastasia, they were moving to Florida.

Anastasia said in an interview in her Miami apartment that her ex-husband never told her why. “I don’t know what goes on in a man’s head,” she said.

In Miami, Uglanov opened a gas station, called Niko Petroleum. When that business struggled, he sold it. He then started a charter boat business and a trucking firm. They struggled, too.

Uglanov did not have connections in the United States like he did in Russia and he didn’t understand how Americans do business, his ex-wife said.
Last August, Uglanov posted a photograph of himself on his Facebook page posing alongside Alexander Zaldostanov, leader of the “Night Wolves” biker gang. The Wolves, and Zaldostanov personally, were made subject to U.S. financial and travel restrictions. The U.S. government said gang members stormed a Ukrainian government naval base and a gas facility during Russia’s annexation of Crimea.

An aide to Zaldostanov did not respond to questions from Reuters. The group, in interviews in Russian media, has denied storming the base and the gas facility.

Zaldostanov has had multiple meetings with Putin, according to the Kremlin’s website. The Russian president awarded Zaldostanov the country’s “medal of honor” in 2013.

In a phone interview late last month, Uglanov confirmed the Trump apartment purchase. He said it was a personal matter and declined to answer questions. “Basically, my private life is not your business,” he said.

THE RAINMAKER
For Dezer, Trump’s American partner in Sunny Isles, the six buildings have been a win for his family, the Trumps and Sunny Isles.

Trump visited the sites at least four times as the buildings – including a hotel – were constructed and promoted between 2001 and 2011, according to Dezer and former employees of Dezer’s company. Trump had approval over the look of the buildings and apartments, Dezer said.

“His people were very much involved in quality control and construction,” Dezer said. “They were down here once every quarter checking on us, the progress. They wanted to see we were making money.”

In 2008, when the housing market crashed, buyers defaulted on 900 Trump apartments, according to Dezer. Dezer said he worked hard over the coming years to pay back creditors. Until those 900 apartments were sold off, Trump did not earn any money for them, he added.

Foreign buyers bought into the Trump buildings as the developers dropped their prices after the crash, according to Dezer and local realtors. The majority of these buyers were from South America, with a smaller percentage of Russians and other former Soviet nationals.

Tanya Tsveyer, a realtor whose Russian clients have bought in the Trump buildings, described her customers as primarily business people, including several with investments across the United States and Russia.

“They bought in the Trump because they liked how the buildings fit their lifestyle,” she said, referring to the Russians.

By early 2011, the Trump buildings had started to turn a profit, according to Dezer. He invited Trump to a mortgage burning ceremony to celebrate Dezer’s paying off the project’s $475 million dollar mortgage. Dezer recalled Trump telling him that he planned to run for president.

At the party, Dezer, his father and Trump gleefully set flame to a stack of mortgage documents, applauded by a crowd of tenants from the Trump buildings and local business people. A video of the event shows Trump smiling, joking and working the crowd.

“I was with Michael Jackson when he had the hair burned with the Pepsi, and it was a disaster,” Trump told revelers, referring to the time the pop superstar’s hair caught fire during the 1984 filming of a Pepsi commercial. “I am sitting next to that friggin’ fire, and if my hair goes, I am out of business.”

Dezer and Trump got help selling the condos from Elena Baronoff, who immigrated from the Soviet Union in the 1980s. Baronoff, who grew up in Uzbekistan, had been active in Soviet cultural associations. In Miami, she soon began bringing Russian tour groups to Miami.

Gil Dezer’s father, Michael, recruited Baronoff to work alongside the Dezer corporation. She traveled to Moscow, St Petersburg, France and London to bring in Russian buyers, according to Dezer, selling apartments to them for between $1 million and $2 million. Baronoff was diagnosed with Leukemia in 2014 and died a year later.

“She was huge, she was big for them,” Dezer said, referring to Russian buyers. “No one has filled her shoes.”

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/special-report-russian-elite-invested-nearly-dollar100-million-in-trump-buildings-records-show/ar-BByi2O8?ocid=spartanntp
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Offline Beneath

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23809 on: March 18, 2017, 03:16:03 AM »
I don't think he shook Theresa May's hand, did he? This is gonna sound weird, but he's got that creepy grab-and-pull/yank alpha male handshake; does he know how to shake a woman's hand?

Given his earlier admission on how he prefers to introduce himself to women, it's possible May counts herself fortunate.
I saw the devil in his eyes, and I shit me undercrackers

Offline GreatEx

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23810 on: March 18, 2017, 03:55:59 AM »
I don't think he shook Theresa May's hand, did he? This is gonna sound weird, but he's got that creepy grab-and-pull/yank alpha male handshake; does he know how to shake a woman's hand?

Same forward tug with the right but with an additional downward push on the head with the left.

Offline Trada

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23811 on: March 18, 2017, 08:49:46 AM »
 Steve Kopack‏Verified account @SteveKopack

Trump: "Major meeting" tonight at Mar-a-Lago to "talk all about the VA"

*turns to VA Sec.* Will you be there?

*awkwardly shakes head no*

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/TxmRdJNEUYw&amp;feature=youtu.be" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/TxmRdJNEUYw&amp;feature=youtu.be</a>


Offline PhilV

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23812 on: March 18, 2017, 09:48:04 AM »
I am not Chancellor Merkel's fan by any stretch of the imagination but it was great seeing her next to "The Donald"


It was day and night the gulf in class and political experience one had over the other, the guy was a muppet as per and she carried herself well and spoke very well, the guy can barely grasp English!


The reporter asking him why he always says false statement  ;D ;D ;D ;D
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Offline Party Phil

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23813 on: March 18, 2017, 10:13:13 AM »
If you're lying, I'll chop your head off.

Offline jambutty

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23814 on: March 18, 2017, 10:28:37 AM »
Bill Maher Calls Rachel Maddow’s Trump Tax Scoop ‘A Big Nothing Burger’

Rachel Maddow's segment-turned-media frenzy about Donald Drumpf's tax returns is over, done and gone... but certainly not forgotten, at least not by "Real Time" host Bill Maher or former Democratic congressman from Massachusetts, Barney Frank.

"I'm a big fan of Rachel Maddow -- I want her on the air -- but you can be a fan of somebody and not like everything they do," Maher said Friday night on his HBO show.

He went on to say that he understood the hype that was given to kick off MSNBC's "The Rachel Maddow Show" Tuesday by their tweet, "BREAKING: We've got Trump tax returns," and acknowledged that's what people objected to but, he added, the countdown clock was like "liberal New Year's Eve."

"And then it turned out to be a big Nothing Burger. Worse than a Nothing Burger. It was a Help Trump Burger," the comedian said, noting that the two-page document from President Trump's 2005 tax returns showed that he paid $38 million in taxes on earnings of $150 million, which is about 25 percent.

"Which is well within respectable! This is probably the best tax return he's ever filed... which makes me think this came from Donald Drumpf!" Maher said, suggesting that "liberals have to be careful these days."

"He's actually good at this," Maher said, referring to Trump. "If we want to win this, we can't get played. This is getting played."

"I didn't like what she did," Frank interjected. "Her journalistic scoop was, apparently, to say, 'Oh, thank you.' I don't consider that crusading journalism."

Maddow appeared on "The Tonight Show" Wednesday to discuss her reveal of President Trump's tax returns that left some viewers disappointed earlier in the week. "Was there a huge, damning bombshell in these tax returns? No. The bombshell here is that some of his tax returns were made public for the first time when he's been trying so hard to keep them secret," Maddow told host Jimmy Fallon.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/news/bill-maher-calls-rachel-maddow%e2%80%99s-trump-tax-scoop-%e2%80%98a-big-nothing-burger%e2%80%99/ar-BByiM5v?ocid=spartanntp
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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23815 on: March 18, 2017, 10:39:41 AM »
When you have someone like milo on your show you lose pretty much all moral authority to be honest

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23816 on: March 18, 2017, 12:11:20 PM »
If you're lying, I'll chop your head off.

Offline Tepid T₂O

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23817 on: March 18, 2017, 12:14:18 PM »
I posted that 2 posts ago
Shit!  Sorry!  It was a bit small ;D
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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23818 on: March 18, 2017, 12:31:12 PM »
Shit!  Sorry!  It was a bit small ;D

I guarantee that there's no problem with the size of my posts. I guarantee.
If you're lying, I'll chop your head off.

Offline Tepid T₂O

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23819 on: March 18, 2017, 12:32:25 PM »
I guarantee that there's no problem with the size of my posts. I guarantee.
:lmao


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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23820 on: March 18, 2017, 01:02:15 PM »
I guarantee that there's no problem with the size of my posts. I guarantee.

Believe me!!!!

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23821 on: March 18, 2017, 01:23:12 PM »
"Despite what you have heard from the FAKE NEWS, I had a GREAT meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Nevertheless, Germany owes....."

It feels like Donald Drumpf has become a delusional parody of Donald Drumpf these days
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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23822 on: March 18, 2017, 01:37:46 PM »
Can I just say that Party Phil has tremendous posts.
It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23823 on: March 18, 2017, 01:38:40 PM »
"Despite what you have heard from the FAKE NEWS, I had a GREAT meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Nevertheless, Germany owes....."

It feels like Donald Drumpf has become a delusional parody of Donald Drumpf these days
someone could hack his twitter and we'd be none the wiser

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23824 on: March 18, 2017, 02:02:55 PM »
I really hope that soon, some world leader (probably the Candadian PM) gives Trump a lovely silver baseball cap with "Make America Great Again" printed proudly on it.  He'll put it on and wear it, with that smug grin pointed towards the cameras and his stupidly vacant expression as raises his arms aloft in some triumphant gesture.  "Should be gold.  Should be gold," he will quip.

And all the while, the gathered media will take their pictures, bite their tongues, and try desperately not to snigger and guffaw as they watch the President of the United States of America literally wear a foil hat.
Jürgen Klopp does not adapt to English Football.  English Football adapts to Jurgan Klopp.

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23825 on: March 18, 2017, 02:10:32 PM »
Can I just say that Party Phil has tremendous posts.
Bigly posts, the best.
My Twitter

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23826 on: March 18, 2017, 02:17:20 PM »
someone could hack his twitter and we'd be none the wiser

:D

Well put.

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23827 on: March 18, 2017, 02:30:58 PM »
someone could hack his twitter and we'd be none the wiser
Oh, I think we would.  The improvement in spelling and grammar would be a dead giveaway and the tweets might start making sense.

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23828 on: March 18, 2017, 02:31:45 PM »
"Despite what you have heard from the FAKE NEWS, I had a GREAT meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Nevertheless, Germany owes....."

How the fuck does Germany owe vast sums of money to NATO and the U.S.? They have spending targets. The likes of France, Canada and Spain have also not met these 2% targets.

And this was what he said only yesterday:

Quote
U.S. President Donald Drumpf on Friday said the United States would respect historic institutions but that other countries must pay their fair share to support the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

Trump, speaking at a news conference following his meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, said he thanked her "for the German government's commitment to increase defense spending and work toward contributing at least 2 percent of GDP" for NATO
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-germany-usa-nato-idUSKBN16O2HD
« Last Edit: March 18, 2017, 03:01:10 PM by rafathegaffa83 »

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It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23830 on: March 18, 2017, 06:52:57 PM »
"I am a great believer in luck and the harder I work the more of it I have." Stephen Leacock

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23831 on: March 18, 2017, 07:09:49 PM »
Young Americans: Most see Trump as illegitimate president

Associated Press

By LAURIE KELLMAN and EMILY SWANSON, Associated Press
3 hrs ago

WASHINGTON — Jermaine Anderson keeps going back to the same memory of Donald Drumpf, then a candidate for president of the United States, referring to some Mexican immigrants as rapists and murderers.

"You can't be saying that (if) you're the president," says Anderson, a 21-year-old student from Coconut Creek, Florida.

That Trump is undeniably the nation's 45th president doesn't sit easily with young Americans like Anderson who are the nation's increasingly diverse electorate of the future, according to a new poll. A majority of young adults — 57 percent — see Trump's presidency as illegitimate, including about three-quarters of blacks and large majorities of Latinos and Asians, the GenForward poll found.

GenForward is a poll of adults age 18 to 30 conducted by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

A slim majority of young whites in the poll, 53 percent, consider Trump a legitimate president, but even among that group 55 percent disapprove of the job he's doing, according to the survey.

"That's who we voted for. And obviously America wanted him more than Hillary Clinton," said Rebecca Gallardo, a 30-year-old nursing student from Kansas City, Missouri, who voted for Trump.

Trump's legitimacy as president was questioned earlier this year by U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga.: "I think the Russians participated in helping this man get elected. And they helped destroy the candidacy of Hillary Clinton."

Trump routinely denies that and says he captured the presidency in large part by winning states such as Michigan and Wisconsin that Clinton may have taken for granted.

Overall, just 22 percent of young adults approve of the job he is doing as president, while 62 percent disapprove.

Trump's rhetoric as a candidate and his presidential decisions have done much to keep the question of who belongs in America atop the news, though he's struggling to accomplish some key goals.

Powered by supporters chanting, "build the wall," Trump has vowed to erect a barrier along the southern U.S. border and make Mexico pay for it — which Mexico refuses to do. Federal judges in three states have blocked Trump's executive orders to ban travel to the U.S. from seven — then six — majority-Muslim nations.

In Honolulu, U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson this week cited "significant and unrebutted evidence of religious animus" behind the revised travel ban, citing Trump's own words calling for "a complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States."

And yes, Trump did say in his campaign announcement speech on June 6, 2015: "When Mexico sends its people, they're not sending their best ...They're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're rapists. And some, I assume, are good people." He went further in subsequent statements, later telling CNN: "Some are good and some are rapists and some are killers."

It's extraordinary rhetoric for the leader of a country where by around 2020, half of the nation's children will be part of a minority race or ethnic group, the Census Bureau projects. Non-Hispanic whites are expected to be a minority by 2044.

Of all of Trump's tweets and rhetoric, the statements about Mexicans are the ones to which Anderson returns. He says Trump's business background on paper is impressive enough to qualify him for the presidency. But he suggests that's different than Trump earning legitimacy as president.
 
"I'm thinking, he's saying that most of the people in the world who are raping and killing people are the immigrants. That's not true," said Anderson, whose parents are from Jamaica.

Megan Desrochers, a 21-year-old student from Lansing, Michigan, says her sense of Trump's illegitimacy is more about why he was elected.

"I just think it was kind of a situation where he was voted in based on his celebrity status verses his ethics," she said, adding that she is not necessarily against Trump's immigration policies.

The poll participants said in interviews that they don't necessarily vote for one party's candidates over another's, a prominent tendency among young Americans, experts say. And in the survey, neither party fares especially strongly.

Just a quarter of young Americans have a favorable view of the Republican Party, and six in 10 have an unfavorable view. Majorities of young people across racial and ethnic lines hold negative views of the GOP.

The Democratic Party performs better, but views aren't overwhelmingly positive. Young people are more likely to have a favorable than an unfavorable view of the Democratic Party by a 47 percent to 36 percent margin. But just 14 percent say they have a strongly favorable view of the Democrats.

Views of the Democratic Party are most favorable among young people of color. Roughly six in 10 blacks, Asians and Latinos hold positive views of the party. Young whites are somewhat more likely to have unfavorable than favorable views, 47 percent to 39 percent.

As for Trump, eight in 10 young people think he is doing poorly in terms of the policies he's put forward and seven in 10 have negative views of his presidential demeanor.

"I do not like him as a person," Gallardo says of Trump. She nonetheless voted for Trump because she didn't trust Clinton. "I felt like there wasn't much choice."
___
The poll of 1,833 adults age 18-30 was conducted on Feb. 16 through March 6 using a sample drawn from the probability-based GenForward panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. young adult population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 4 percentage points.

The survey was paid for by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago, using grants from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation.

Respondents were first selected randomly using address-based sampling methods, and later interviewed online or by phone.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/young-americans-most-see-trump-as-illegitimate-president/ar-BByl1H6
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Offline jambutty

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23832 on: March 18, 2017, 07:14:40 PM »
With friends like these: Trump struggles to win GOP

WASHINGTON — Congressional Republicans have a lot to say about their new president.

Donald Drumpf's proposed budget is "draconian, careless and counterproductive." The health care plan is a bailout that won't pass. And his administration's suggestion that former President Barack Obama used London's spy agency for surveillance is simply "inexplicable."

With friends like these, who needs Democrats?

Less than two months in, Republicans have emerged as one of the biggest obstacles to Trump's young administration, imperiling his early efforts to pass his agenda and make good on some of his biggest campaign promises.

Trump's embrace of a House GOP plan to overhaul the country's health system faces deep opposition from across the party, as does his push to get U.S. taxpayers to pay for a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. Republicans largely rejected his thin, 53-page first budget, joking that there's a "fat chance for skinny budget" on Capitol Hill. And his tax reform and infrastructure plans have yet to gain any real traction in Congress.

Trump insisted on Friday that he is leading a party that is coalescing behind him.

"I think we have a very unified party. I think actually more unified than even the election," he said at a White House news conference with German leader Angela Merkel. "You see when they talk about me, I seem to be very popular, at least this week within the party."

Long a divisive political figure, Trump entered office with historically low approval ratings and a popular vote loss of nearly 3 million. Still, he claimed a sweeping mandate when he arrived in Washington, fiercely pushing back on any suggestion that he won with less than a historic margin and moving quickly on a series of controversial executive orders.

Now, his administration has reached the limits of what it can achieve without Congress, leaving Trump struggling to lead his party on Capitol Hill — starting with the health care bill.

After years of campaign promises to repeal and replace "Obamacare," the bill presents the first major test of whether Trump and Republican leaders can marshal a fractious GOP caucus behind a major legislative initiative. GOP leaders fear that failure could chip away at Trump's already thin political capital, dooming future efforts on tax reform and infrastructure.

Trump's early missteps have overshadowed one of the administration's smoothest-sailing moves — the nomination of Neil Gorsuch for the Supreme Court. Confirmation hearings begin Monday.

"A president only has so much political capital to expend and so much moral authority as well, and so any time your credibility takes a hit I think in many ways it weakens the officeholder," said Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., who had described the surveillance claims as "inexplicable."

The furor over Trump's unproven claim that Obama wiretapped his New York skyscraper prompted Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma to suggest Trump owes his predecessor an apology.

Republicans almost immediately balked at Trump's budget, with Kentucky Rep. Hal Rogers uttering the "draconian" complaint and others questioning why Trump's core supporters took a hit.

"Rural America stepped up to the plate behind the president in his last election, and we're wholeheartedly behind him. We need to make sure that rural America at least gets its fair share," said Rep. Robert Aderholt, R-Ala.

Trump is hardly the first president to clash with members of his own party. Few congressional Democrats felt a personal connection to Obama, who came under criticism for his hands-off approach to Congress, and his lack of interest in schmoozing with lawmakers or using the trappings of his office to woo them.

While Trump has hosted Republicans for bowling, pizza and other White House events, he's been hampered by his inexperience with governing and his distance from establishment GOP politics. A businessman, Trump has never lined up lawmakers behind a bill, crafted a political coalition or passed a budget — nor have many of his closest aides.

During his campaign, he embraced a populist platform, rejecting traditional conservative positions on issues like trade and cutting costly mandatory programs like Social Security.

Many congressional Republicans, from House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., on down, were slow to embrace Trump's candidacy, and some of those concerns linger.

His series of false claims since the election haven't helped the relationship, distracting from his agenda on Capitol Hill and forcing Republicans to answer near-daily questions about his accusations.

But Trump also seems eager to keep some wiggle room between his presidency and a bill some friends and allies believe is a political trap. They fear the legislation — they've dubbed it Ryancare — could violate some of Trump's populist campaign promises, like providing health insurance for all Americans and preserving Medicaid, for a conservative Republican agenda led by Ryan.

"Speaker Paul Ryan and the establishment GOP have pulled a fast one on President Trump," wrote Eric Bolling, a Fox News host with close ties to Trump, in an op-ed.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/with-friends-like-these-trump-struggles-to-win-gop/ar-BByiLJF?li=BBnbcA1&ocid=SK216DHP
Entitlement: the belief that one is inherently deserving of privileges or special treatment.

Offline rafathegaffa83

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23833 on: March 18, 2017, 08:28:54 PM »
Republicans almost immediately balked at Trump's budget, with Kentucky Rep. Hal Rogers uttering the "draconian" complaint and others questioning why Trump's core supporters took a hit.

[...]

"Rural America stepped up to the plate behind the president in his last election, and we're wholeheartedly behind him. We need to make sure that rural America at least gets its fair share," said Rep. Robert Aderholt, R-Ala.

Well at least some Republicans from unlikely places are seeing this. History is littered with politicians who rile up a base with cheap rhetoric and inflated promises, but have absolutely no empathy with the people who got them there or sense of what those people want. They are simply a means to end. Most of these leaders end up being failures or exceptionally divisive. It will be interesting to see how the average person who voted for Trump responds to these measures, not the social media acolytes or the vocal minority who turn up at rallies.

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23834 on: March 18, 2017, 08:42:59 PM »
Lawfare's Benjamin Wittes asks some questions about how Trump's words seem to be having legal consequences.

Quote
But also there is a third possibility, and we should be candid about it: Perhaps everything [the judges] are saying is right as a matter of law in the regular order, but there’s an unexpressed legal principle functionally at work here: That President Trump is a crazy person whose oath of office large numbers of judges simply don’t trust and to whom, therefore, a whole lot of normal rules of judicial conduct do not apply.

In this scenario, the underlying law is not actually moving much, or moving or at all, but the normal rules of deference and presumption of regularity in presidential conduct—the rules that underlie norms like not looking behind a facially valid purpose for a visa issuance decision—simply don’t apply to Trump. As we’ve argued, these norms are a function of the president’s oath of office and the working assumption that the President is bound by the Take Care Clause. If the judiciary doesn’t trust the sincerity of the president’s oath and doesn’t have any presumption that the president will take care that the laws are faithfully executed, why on earth would it assume that a facially valid purpose of the executive is its actual purpose?

In this scenario, there are really two presidencies for purposes of judicial review: One is the presidency when judges believe the president’s oath—that is, a presidency in which all sorts of norms of deference apply—and the other is a presidency in which judges don’t believe the oath. What we may be watching here is the development of a new body of law for this second type of presidency. 

https://lawfareblog.com/revolt-judges-what-happens-when-judiciary-doesnt-trust-presidents-oath

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Offline rafathegaffa83

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23835 on: March 18, 2017, 09:04:22 PM »
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/mar/18/trump-merkel-nato-germany-owe-money-tweet

Thought this bit was crucial from Ivo Daalder

Quote
Trump’s tweets on Saturday suggested a misunderstanding of the way Nato is funded. According to Nato’s official guidelines, member nations are expected to spend at least 2% of their country’s gross domestic product (GDP) on defense. However, only a handful of the 28 members actually meet that target.

At a 2014 summit in Wales, members pledged to increase their military spending to 2% of GDP by 2024, a goal some have said is unachievable and unrealistic for several member states.

Ultimately, members’ contributions are based on each nation’s capability. Therefore, Nato member nations do not “owe” or have to compensate any other country.

On Saturday Ivo Daalder, who was permanent representative to Nato from 2009 to 2013, respond to Trump in a series of tweets.

“Sorry, Mr President, that’s not how Nato works,” he wrote. “The US decides for itself how much it contributes to defending Nato. This is not a financial transaction, where Nato countries pay the US to defend them. It is part of our treaty commitment.

“All Nato countries, including Germany, have committed to spend 2% of GDP on defense by 2024. So far five of 28 Nato countries do. Those who currently don’t spend 2% of their GDP on defense are now increasing their defense budgets. That’s a good thing.

“But no funds will be paid to the US. They are meant to increase Nato’s overall defense capabilities, given the growing Russian threat. Europe must spend more on defense, but not as favor (or payment) to the US. But because their security requires it.”

Daalder added that the “large military commitment” of the US to Nato was “not a favor to Europe” but was “vital for our own security”.

“We fought two world wars in Europe, and one cold war,” he wrote. “Keeping Europe whole, free, and at peace, is vital US interest.”
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/mar/18/trump-merkel-nato-germany-owe-money-tweet

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23836 on: March 18, 2017, 09:12:18 PM »
Can I just say that Party Phil has tremendous posts.
Party Phil eh.
going to bed now

I'm going to bed
I'm going to bed
I'm not going to bed. Gonna stay up and do an exam at 9am tomorrow
The fake partier  ;D

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23837 on: March 18, 2017, 09:13:07 PM »
Party Phil eh.The fake partier  ;D

Fake bed news.
It's true to say that if Shankly had told us to invade Poland we'd be queuing up 10 deep all the way from Anfield to the Pier Head.

Offline jambutty

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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23838 on: March 18, 2017, 09:39:11 PM »
In One Rocky Week, Trump’s Self-Inflicted Chaos on Vivid Display

The New York Times
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and MAGGIE HABERMAN
4 hrs ago

WASHINGTON — Minutes before President Trump was to take the stage in Nashville last week to make his case for the health care overhaul he had promised, he received some unwelcome news that shifted his script.

A federal district court judge in Hawaii had just placed another stay on his ban on travelers from six predominantly Muslim countries, dealing his order a second legal setback in two months. As a country music duo crooned in an auditorium still filling with adoring supporters of Mr. Trump, the president fumed backstage and huddled with his staff for a hasty re-drafting of the speech.

When Mr. Trump emerged, he decided to relegate the health care overhaul, which he has identified as a top domestic priority, to a brief mention more than halfway through the speech. He instead replaced its prime billing with an angry diatribe against the travel ban ruling and the judge who had issued it.

“I have to be nice, otherwise I’ll get criticized for speaking poorly about our courts,” Mr. Trump said. But he could not help himself: The president soon suggested the court that had just ruled against him should be destroyed. “People are screaming, ‘Break up the Ninth Circuit!’ ”

Once again, Mr. Trump’s agenda was subsumed by problems of his own making, his message undercut by a seemingly endless stream of controversy he cannot seem to stop himself from feeding.

The health care measure appears on track for a House vote this coming week, and the president, who planned a weekend of relaxation at Mar-a-Lago, his Palm Beach, Fla., club, is likely to receive a large measure of the credit. But it has also become clear that Mr. Trump, an agitator incapable of responding proportionately to any slight, appears hellbent on squandering his honeymoon.

Instead, he has sowed chaos in his own West Wing, and talked or tweeted his way into trouble, over and over again.

That was never more apparent than over the last week, when fresh questions about his refusal to release his tax returns and the blocking of his executive order sapped the spotlight from his efforts to build support for the health measure and even the unveiling of his first budget.

Even more self-lacerating: his insistence that President Barack Obama authorized surveillance on his 2016 campaign, which continued unabated despite rebukes from Republicans, denials by the congressional intelligence committees, and the complaints of the British government, which demanded an apology after Mr. Trump’s spokesman suggested one of its intelligence agencies had aided in the spying.

“It’s a pattern with him — he sometimes counterpunches so hard he hits himself,” said Ari Fleischer, a former White House press secretary for George W. Bush.
The public outbursts are mirrored by internal tensions. With the embers of the old rivalry between his chief strategist, Stephen K. Bannon, and chief of staff, Reince Priebus, extinguished, a new realignment has emerged in a West Wing already rived by suspicion and intrigue.

Gary Cohn, the former Goldman Sachs executive who serves as the president’s top economic policy adviser and who is decidedly more liberal than the rest of Mr. Trump’s inner circle, is on the rise, and has the ear of the president’s powerful son-in-law, Jared Kushner. Mr. Kushner also gained an ally on the National Security Council with the appointment of Dina Powell, a Republican and another former Goldman official who worked with Mr. Cohn, as a deputy for strategy.

In the newness of the administration, the constant need to tend to internal dynamics has been a distraction. The aides have watched each other warily and tried tending to the president’s base of supporters amid a sea of appointments of people who worked on Wall Street.

Frustration in D.C.

Mr. Trump is not bothered by turf battles in his administration. He believes they foster competition and keep any one aide from accumulating too much power. He is even more enthusiastic about waging war publicly, believing that it fires up his white working-class base.

Indeed, in Nashville on Wednesday night, Mr. Trump spoke to a rapturous crowd of almost 10,000 people and his embattled spokesman, Sean Spicer, was greeted as a star by awe-struck supporters, who spent several minutes crowding around him for pictures and to pat him on the back.

But in Washington, some Republican lawmakers and officials have watched in dismay and frustration, they say privately, because the president they are looking to for cover and salesmanship of the health care overhaul keeps getting sidetracked.

One of those diversions came after the judge’s ruling on the travel ban. In Nashville, the president said he would prefer to go back to his first, more restrictive ban and pursue it to the Supreme Court. “That’s what I wanted to do in the first place,” Mr. Trump said, a statement that seems destined to be used against his own lawyers in upcoming court cases on the executive order.

For Mr. Trump, this was supposed to be a week of pivoting and message discipline. The president read from a script during public appearances and posted on Twitter less often. He invited lawmakers from both parties to the White House for strategy sessions on the health measure. He scheduled policy speeches, like one near Detroit, where he announced he was halting fuel economy standards imposed by Mr. Obama, and the rally in Nashville, where he visited the grave of Andrew Jackson, the populist patron selected by his history-minded political impresario, Mr. Bannon, as Mr. Trump’s presidential analog.
But by Friday, as Mr. Trump worked to call attention to his powers of persuasion in securing commitments from a dozen wavering Republicans to back the health measure, the White House was left frantically trying to explain why Mr. Spicer had repeated allegations that the Government Communications Headquarters, the British spy agency, had helped to eavesdrop on the president during the campaign.

Rather than expressing regret for a slight of one of the United States’ strongest allies, Mr. Trump was unapologetic.

“We said nothing,” he said at a news conference with Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany. “All we did was quote a certain very talented legal mind who was the one responsible for saying that on television,” he added, referring to Andrew Napolitano, the commentator who first leveled the charge about the involvement of the British intelligence service on Fox News.

That did not seem to be enough for the irate British, who had called the charge “nonsense” and “utterly ridiculous.” Shepard Smith, a Fox News anchor, later disavowed it as well, saying his network could not back up Mr. Napolitano’s claims.

The episode left little time for talk of Mr. Trump’s “America First” budget released on Thursday, filled with domestic spending cuts so deep that even his budget director conceded they would be unpopular, or the health care measure that would affect more than 20 percent of the economy.

“This White House is on two tracks,” Mr. Fleischer said. “The legislative one, which has been surprisingly and pleasantly productive, and the other one full of self-induced error.”

The problem for Mr. Trump, he added, is that the self-destructive behavior, if it continues, threatens to overshadow everything else.

“He has a tremendous number of ingredients at his disposal to be a very successful president,” Mr. Fleischer added, “but he might not even get credit for it if he is so red-hot controversial.”

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/in-one-rocky-week-trump%E2%80%99s-self-inflicted-chaos-on-vivid-display/ar-BByliez?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartanntp
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Re: The Malevolent Orange Ball of Gas. Squirrel!
« Reply #23839 on: March 18, 2017, 09:42:27 PM »
Thought this bit was crucial from Ivo Daalder

This language about NATO dates from back into his campaign where he seemed to switch between understanding the issue and not (Glenn Kessler at The Washington Post fact checked him a year ago on the very same thing!). Yesterday, did he seem to be carefully reading the words he used?Which suggests that the fault goes a fair bit beyond him just not understanding and asks questions more about the intent in framing NATO members' spending in that way.
"And the voices of the standing Kop still whispering in the wind will salute the wee Scots redman and he will still walk on.
And your money will have bought you nothing."