Author Topic: Space exploration thread  (Read 174372 times)

Online Red Berry

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2320 on: April 2, 2020, 09:54:25 PM »
Scott Manley talks asteroids.


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Offline reddebs

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2321 on: April 7, 2020, 10:14:04 PM »
Anyone managed to get a good view of tonight's pink supermoon?

It's not that good here so far as I got a better look at the one this morning.

I managed to get this on my phone.

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Offline LOKKO

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2322 on: April 9, 2020, 09:13:14 AM »
I got a couple of shots... i planned a photo of it rising over some apartments but the Nikon p900 i lent was crap in low light so ended.up.with just this

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2323 on: April 9, 2020, 09:33:08 AM »
I got a couple of shots... i planned a photo of it rising over some apartments but the Nikon p900 i lent was crap in low light so ended.up.with just this
Great pic mate

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2324 on: April 13, 2020, 05:15:06 PM »
Worth remembering the Apollo 13 ordeal 50 years ago when on April 14, 1970 they reported the now infamous "Houston, we have a problem"
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6f/Apollo13-wehaveaproblem.ogg

And it's a shame that there was no mentioning at all in the U.S. media of the anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's flight, the first man in space...
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Offline Buggy Eyes Alfredo

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2325 on: May 7, 2020, 01:44:19 AM »


New image captures 'impossible' view of the moon's surface

   
You've never seen the moon like in this 'all terminator' image (and you never will).

Shadows creep down the banks of every crater on the near-side of the moon, highlighting the pockmarked face of Earth's gravitationally-bound buddy with a clarity never before seen.

According to photographer Andrew McCarthy, who posted the stunning image to his Instagram in April, there's a simple explanation for the unprecedented level of detail in his work — this lunar view is actually "impossible."

"This moon might look a little funny to you, and that's because it is an impossible scene," McCarthy wrote on Instagram. "From two weeks of images of the waxing moon, I took the section of the picture that has the most contrast … aligned and blended them to show the rich texture across the entire surface."

The high-contrast section of the moon that McCarthy referred to is called the "lunar terminator" — the long line in the sand (or regolith, if you prefer) that divides the moon’s Earth-facing side between darkness and light. This terminator line moves around constantly depending on the phase of the moon, revealing or concealing new sections of the lunar surface each day as the satellite moves in and out of Earth’s shadow. Because the terminator line heightens the contrast between the light and dark sides of the moon’s face, shadows look elongated and intensified in craters closest to the terminator.

With this in mind, McCarthy trained his camera on the craters closest to the lunar terminator every night for two weeks as the moon waxed toward complete illumination. By the time the moon was full, McCarthy had a series of high-contrast, high-definition photos of every crater on the moon's Earth-facing side. Blending them into a single composite image was "exhausting," he wrote, but ultimately resulted in the gorgeously detailed shot seen above — an image that McCarthy calls the "all terminator" moon.

This impossible composite can't really be considered a true photograph of the moon, but the finished whole certainly amounts to more than the sum of its shady-cratered parts.

https://www.livescience.com/amp/terminator-moon-composite-image.html



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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2326 on: May 7, 2020, 12:24:48 PM »
That's stunning!

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2327 on: May 7, 2020, 10:50:56 PM »

New image captures 'impossible' view of the moon's surface

   
You've never seen the moon like in this 'all terminator' image (and you never will).

Shadows creep down the banks of every crater on the near-side of the moon, highlighting the pockmarked face of Earth's gravitationally-bound buddy with a clarity never before seen.

According to photographer Andrew McCarthy, who posted the stunning image to his Instagram in April, there's a simple explanation for the unprecedented level of detail in his work — this lunar view is actually "impossible."

"This moon might look a little funny to you, and that's because it is an impossible scene," McCarthy wrote on Instagram. "From two weeks of images of the waxing moon, I took the section of the picture that has the most contrast … aligned and blended them to show the rich texture across the entire surface."

The high-contrast section of the moon that McCarthy referred to is called the "lunar terminator" — the long line in the sand (or regolith, if you prefer) that divides the moon’s Earth-facing side between darkness and light. This terminator line moves around constantly depending on the phase of the moon, revealing or concealing new sections of the lunar surface each day as the satellite moves in and out of Earth’s shadow. Because the terminator line heightens the contrast between the light and dark sides of the moon’s face, shadows look elongated and intensified in craters closest to the terminator.

With this in mind, McCarthy trained his camera on the craters closest to the lunar terminator every night for two weeks as the moon waxed toward complete illumination. By the time the moon was full, McCarthy had a series of high-contrast, high-definition photos of every crater on the moon's Earth-facing side. Blending them into a single composite image was "exhausting," he wrote, but ultimately resulted in the gorgeously detailed shot seen above — an image that McCarthy calls the "all terminator" moon.

This impossible composite can't really be considered a true photograph of the moon, but the finished whole certainly amounts to more than the sum of its shady-cratered parts.

https://www.livescience.com/amp/terminator-moon-composite-image.html




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Offline J-Mc-

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2328 on: May 11, 2020, 12:22:51 AM »
Any ideas what this is?

Mate filmed it tonight over Huyton.

https://twitter.com/mrmackjnr/status/1259618436151468033?s=21

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2329 on: May 11, 2020, 12:32:35 AM »
Any ideas what this is?

Mate filmed it tonight over Huyton.

https://twitter.com/mrmackjnr/status/1259618436151468033?s=21


Looks like one of the Tesla crackpots satellites
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Offline farawayred

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2331 on: May 12, 2020, 06:08:43 AM »
The Mars 2020 sample cash hardware flew this morning to Florida to get integrated with the rover, right on schedule for the July launch. Mechanism problems persist, but nothing we can't recover from (so far). Hopefully all goes well...

Amazing how smooth things move in these COVID times with less than 10% supporting personnel available on lab...
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Offline Buggy Eyes Alfredo

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2332 on: May 13, 2020, 07:59:44 AM »

Scientists have created the highest-resolution photos of Jupiter ever captured from the ground, including this gorgeous infrared photo created by stacking a large number of exposures.

Researchers at the NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory (NOIRLab) spent three years capturing observations using a selection-and-stacking technique called “lucky imaging” using the Gemini North telescope on Hawaii’s Maunakea (a dormant volcano).

The photo above was created by shooting 9 “pointings” from the observatory with 38 exposures captured for each pointing. The sharpest 10% of each set was selected and stacked to create a sharp image of 1/9th of Jupiter’s full disk. Those 9 pieces are then combined to create the full view of the gas giant.

“Even though it only takes a few seconds for Gemini to create each image in a lucky imaging set, completing all 38 exposures in a set can take minutes — long enough for features to rotate noticeably across the disk,” the observatory writes. “In order to compare and combine the images, they are first mapped to their actual latitude and longitude on Jupiter, using the limb, or edge of the disk, as a reference.

“Once the mosaics are compiled into a full disk, the final images are some of the highest-resolution infrared views of Jupiter ever taken from the ground.”

“The Gemini data were critical because they allowed us to probe deeply into Jupiter’s clouds on a regular schedule,” says team lead Michael Wong of UC Berkeley. “We used a very powerful technique called lucky imaging. […] These images rival the view from space.”

When compared with optical and ultraviolet images captured by the Hubble Space Telescope, the infrared Gemini photos helped confirm that the dark spots in the famous Great Red Spot on Jupiter — a ginormous storm — are actually holes in the clouds rather than darker-colored clouds.

“It’s kind of like a jack-o-lantern,” Wong says. “You see bright infrared light coming from cloud-free areas, but where there are clouds, it’s really dark in the infrared.”

https://petapixel.com/2020/05/12/this-is-an-infrared-photo-of-jupiter/



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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2333 on: May 14, 2020, 11:15:45 PM »

OGLE-2018-BLG-0677Lb: A Super-Earth Near the Galactic Bulge
Antonio Herrera-Martín1, M. D. Albrow1, A. Udalski2, A. Gould3,4,5, Y.-H. Ryu4, J. C. Yee6, S.-J. Chung4,7, C. Han8, K.-H. Hwang4, Y. K. Jung6
Published 2020 May 7 • © 2020. The American Astronomical Society.
The Astronomical Journal, Volume 159, Number 6

Abstract
We report the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2018-BLG-0677. A small feature in the light curve of the event leads to the discovery that the lens is a star–planet system. Although there are two degenerate solutions that could not be distinguished for this event, both lead to a similar planet-host mass ratio. We perform a Bayesian analysis based on a Galactic model to obtain the properties of the system and find that the planet corresponds to a super-Earth/sub-Neptune with a mass of ${M}_{\mathrm{planet}}={3.96}_{-2.66}^{+5.88}{M}_{\oplus }$. The host star has a mass of ${M}_{\mathrm{host}}={0.12}_{-0.08}^{+0.14}\,{M}_{\odot }$. The projected separation for the inner and outer solutions are ${0.63}_{-0.17}^{+0.20}$ au and ${0.72}_{-0.19}^{+0.23}$ au respectively. At ${\rm{\Delta }}{\chi }^{2}={\chi }^{2}(1{\rm{L}}1{\rm{S}})-{\chi }^{2}(2{\rm{L}}1{\rm{S}})=46$, this is by far the lowest Δχ 2 for any securely detected microlensing planet to date, a feature that is closely connected to the fact that it is detected primarily via a "dip" rather than a "bump."

https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-3881/ab893e


Planet hunters discover new 'one in a million' Super-Earth
by University of Canterbury

Astronomers at the University of Canterbury (UC) have found an incredibly rare new Super-Earth planet towards the centre of the galaxy. The planet is one of only a handful that have been discovered with both size and orbit comparable to that of Earth.

Astronomers at the University of Canterbury (UC) have found an incredibly rare new Super-Earth planet towards the centre of the galaxy.

The planet is one of only a handful that have been discovered with both size and orbit comparable to that of Earth. The planet-hunters' research has recently been published in the Astronomical Journal.

Lead researchers in the discovery, astronomers Dr. Antonio Herrera Martin and Associate Professor Michael Albrow, both of UC's School of Physical and Chemical Sciences in the College of Science, are part of an international team of astronomers who collaborated on the Super-Earth research.

Dr. Herrera Martin, the paper's lead author, describes the planet-finding discovery as incredibly rare.

"To have an idea of the rarity of the detection, the time it took to observe the magnification due to the host star was approximately five days, while the planet was detected only during a small five-hour distortion. After confirming this was indeed caused by another 'body' different from the star, and not an instrumental error, we proceeded to obtain the characteristics of the star-planet system," he says.

Using the solar system as a point of reference, the host star is about 10% the mass of our Sun, and the planet would have a mass somewhere between that of Earth and Neptune, and would orbit at a location between Venus and Earth from the parent star. Due to the host star having a smaller mass than our Sun, the planet would have a 'year' of approximately 617 days.

The new planet is among only a handful of extra-solar planets that have been detected with both sizes and orbits close to that of Earth.

Dr. Herrera Martin explains the planet was discovered using a technique called gravitational microlensing.

"The combined gravity of the planet and its host star caused the light from a more distant background star to be magnified in a particular way. We used telescopes distributed around the world to measure the light-bending effect."

The microlensing effect is rare, with only about one in a million stars in the galaxy being affected at any given time. Furthermore, this type of observation does not repeat, and the probabilities of catching a planet at the same time are extremely low, the UC astronomer says.

This particular microlensing event was observed during 2018 and designated OGLE-2018-BLG-0677. It was independently detected by the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) using a telescope in Chile, and the Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) to which the UC astronomers belong, using three identical telescopes in Chile, Australia, and South Africa. The KMTNet telescopes are equipped with very large cameras, which the team uses to measure the light output from around one hundred million (100,000,000) stars every 15 minutes.

"These experiments detect around 3000 microlensing events each year, the majority of which are due to lensing by single stars," the paper's co-author Associate Professor Albrow notes.

"Dr. Herrera Martin first noticed that there was an unusual shape to the light output from this event, and undertook months of computational analysis that resulted in the conclusion that this event was due to a star with a low-mass planet."

https://phys.org/news/2020-05-planet-hunters-million-super-earth.html

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2334 on: May 23, 2020, 09:15:15 PM »
NASA's head of human spaceflight just up and resigned.

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Offline Lone Star Red

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2335 on: May 27, 2020, 03:38:05 PM »
SpaceX and NASA are attempting to put US astronauts into space from US soil this afternoon for the first time since the Space Shuttle program was ended, nearly a decade ago:

https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/26/tech/spacex-nasa-launch-may-27-scn/index.html
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2336 on: May 27, 2020, 03:52:54 PM »
SpaceX and NASA are attempting to put US astronauts into space from US soil this afternoon for the first time since the Space Shuttle program was ended, nearly a decade ago:

https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/26/tech/spacex-nasa-launch-may-27-scn/index.html
Live broadcast on NASA TV starts at 12:15 with the launch scheduled for 16:33 EDT (UTC-4). I'm not sure if this site will be accessible from Europe, but it's a public site:
https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html#public
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2337 on: May 27, 2020, 03:54:23 PM »
Just tried it now and it is accessible
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Offline farawayred

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2338 on: May 27, 2020, 04:14:06 PM »
You can try to dock the Dragon yourselves:
https://iss-sim.spacex.com/

:)
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Offline IgorBobbins

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2339 on: May 27, 2020, 05:02:28 PM »
What’s the scheduled lift off U.K. time, peeps? I’m watching the NASA livestream on YouTube

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2340 on: May 27, 2020, 05:08:48 PM »
What’s the scheduled lift off U.K. time, peeps? I’m watching the NASA livestream on YouTube

9.33pm I think it is.

Offline IgorBobbins

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2341 on: May 27, 2020, 05:09:16 PM »

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2342 on: May 27, 2020, 07:40:48 PM »
Have they brought the launch forward or are they going to be sat horizontally in there for the next couple of hours just prepping?   ???
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2343 on: May 27, 2020, 08:59:05 PM »
Live broadcast on NASA TV starts at 12:15 with the launch scheduled for 16:33 EDT (UTC-4). I'm not sure if this site will be accessible from Europe, but it's a public site:
https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html#public

Here's a youtube link too.  About 30 minutes to go:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aymrnzianf0
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2344 on: May 27, 2020, 09:13:45 PM »
3 mins away from the next weather check. Looks very cloudy and windy

Looks all very Elon Musk inside that capsule. Very clean and white.

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2345 on: May 27, 2020, 09:14:52 PM »
Looks like it's getting scrubbed

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2346 on: May 27, 2020, 09:15:50 PM »
Yeah think the weather is going to claim this one
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2347 on: May 27, 2020, 09:17:31 PM »
Launch aborted

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2348 on: May 27, 2020, 09:18:17 PM »
Saturday the next window

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2349 on: May 27, 2020, 09:19:04 PM »
Bollocks to that

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2350 on: May 27, 2020, 09:20:21 PM »
Bummer...
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2351 on: May 27, 2020, 09:23:55 PM »
Saturday at 8.22 BST the next effort then?

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2352 on: May 27, 2020, 09:29:34 PM »
Will it not be too light for us to see in the UK at that time?

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2353 on: May 27, 2020, 09:37:06 PM »
Will it not be too light for us to see in the UK at that time?

8.22 pm. But yeah it probably will be too bright unless you use binoculars are something.

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2354 on: May 27, 2020, 09:42:40 PM »
8.22 pm. But yeah it probably will be too bright unless you use binoculars are something.

Yeah.  Sunset in Liverpool is 9.28pm Saturday, so best bet is the sun catches the launch trail?
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2355 on: May 27, 2020, 09:45:28 PM »
8.22 pm. But yeah it probably will be too bright unless you use binoculars are something.

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2356 on: May 27, 2020, 10:03:46 PM »
Think they said it was always likely to get scrubbed today didn’t they? High chance of cloud cover I believe.

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2357 on: May 27, 2020, 10:07:26 PM »
Think they said it was always likely to get scrubbed today didn’t they? High chance of cloud cover I believe.

I was reading earlier that they have to consider the conditions of the ocean where the landing pads are among other things.

Quote
Everyone is keeping their eye on the weather. SpaceX and Nasa have strict criteria that have to be met before they will proceed with a launch. The winds, the cloud cover, precipitation and lightning – all these factors must be watched very closely. And it’s not just the conditions at ground level on the launch pad that matter. Controllers are interested in what the weather is doing at different altitudes as the rocket climbs into the sky and heads out across the Atlantic Ocean. Going into Wednesday, the forecasters were saying there was a 50:50 chance of favourable weather for the launch. But crucially this forecast was only for the Kennedy launch site itself.

SpaceX and Nasa also need to listen to what the meteorologists are telling them about the conditions along the flight line in the event that the Dragon has to abort its ascent. If something goes wrong with its rocket, the capsule will need to splashdown somewhere along a swathe of ocean that stretches all the way up the eastern seaboard of the US and reaches across to the British Isles. SpaceX has designated certain zones where the crew would ditch, and each one has to have benign wave and wind conditions. If any of these zones step outside the permitted criteria, the launch will not proceed… even if it’s a beautiful day back in Florida.

And just to add to the complication, a tropical storm has formed off South Carolina.


Looks like they'd a fair idea it would be aborted.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2020, 10:11:22 PM by Barneylfc∗ »

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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2358 on: Yesterday at 05:10:23 AM »
Think they said it was always likely to get scrubbed today didn’t they? High chance of cloud cover I believe.
Saturday's chances are not a hell of a lot better...
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Re: Space exploration thread
« Reply #2359 on: Yesterday at 10:28:00 AM »
I was reading earlier that they have to consider the conditions of the ocean where the landing pads are among other things.

Looks like they'd a fair idea it would be aborted.

Reading that and you realise NASA's come a long way from launching Apollo 12 into a lightning storm  ;D
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