Author Topic: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player  (Read 37314 times)

Offline lachesis

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How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« on: December 31, 2010, 01:51:07 PM »

Not the most grabbing of titles I grant you, but the title fits the subject matter quite well. Humble, understated and often in the background of more illuminating topics of debate. I know there are countless Lucas threads, indeed I have posted in many of them but I feel his story needs its own place, with as much as possible about his emergence in one place. I hope it will serve as an article rather than a place for any cheap swipes and fans can look back at the importance of being patient and not to be too hasty when judging developing players as we seem to be heading in this direction with NESV’s policy on young talents.

Quote from: John W. Henry
"We need 'top four' young players," Henry said. "They will not produce a quick fix but our philosophy in football will be based on the long-term.

"That is what has made Arsenal and Manchester United so strong. They understand something we understand in Boston - to be consistently strong on the field you must have a consistent flow of young talent that has been nurtured and developed the right way.

"We will focus on that. That is also the philosophy of Damien Comolli."

            - John W. Henry



To start the Lucas Leiva story, we must go back to the wake of the 06/07 season. After the heroics of 2005 and a scintillating FA Cup Final, and an undeserved loss in the 2007 Champions League Final Rafa's stock was never higher and with the entire fanbase behind him, felt confident enough to make a few caustic statements at the then chairmen and CEO.

Quote from: Rafa Benitez
Asked if he was frustrated and angry he replied ‘Yes, both of those things.’

Quote from: Rafa Benitez
He then went on to say, ‘I don't want more money than anyone else, I'm not saying I need £40million to spend on top strikers,' Benitez explained. 'But if we have money I need to use it, and the key is to use it quickly. We need to move quicker than Chelsea and Manchester United, and this is a crucial time. It is not always a question of the amount you pay, but how quickly you move. I have targets in mind and if we cannot make a major signing in the next week I will be disappointed. If we miss out now, it might be a struggle to make the top four again next season.'


In the aftermath of these comments things looked to be happening. The fanbase were pretty much united in thinking we had a pretty strong core in Reina, central defence and our midfield was celebrated with ‘the best midfield in the world song’. What we lacked and had failed to address for some time was a prolific front man and quality wide players. With the acquisition of Torres, excitement started to bubble (although there were some quizzical eyebrows about whether Torres could be that prolific player we really needed, which thankfully he put to bed early on). We still had the services of Mascherano anyway and most eyes watched keenly for the next exciting players to arrive. Unfortunately the calibre of signings we ended up with were Benayoun and Pennant, hardly ones to set the pulses racing. Although they were decent enough there were doubts whether these were the type of players that could seriously kick us on and have an instant positive impact. The total outlayed on these players was £11.7 million. Our other heavy investment was made on two young players for £17.5 million in Ryan Babel and Lucas Leiva.

After an impressive outing in youth competitions Babel looked like he could become the left sided forward player we so desperately craved and was taken to by the fans before kicking a ball. The plateau he was put on whipped up a frenzy of excitement about the young starlet we could see gracing Anfield and we crowed about how we had beaten off other clubs for his signature. In contrast Lucas was greeted with muted contempt and a pre-emptive attitude of there being no place to accommodate him. Quotes like the following were common (lifted from his signing thread, they will remain anonymous as there were countless others I could have picked):

Quote
Lucky we signed him, our stock levels of world clash young midfielders is starting to diminish.

Quote
Sorry did you say defensive midfielder?
Seriously?
Do we need another one? Let's be honest - is Rafa's ultimate aim to field a team of defensive midfielders?
If this is true then he must be expecting Masch to leave at the end of his loan, or that Xabi or Sissoko are leaving, because how you can accomodate 4 defensive midfielders at one club, is beyond me.

Quote
Why waste £4 million+ on "potential" when we have four excellent central midfielders in Mascherano, Sissoko, Alonso and Gerrard? They are all young guys. Alonso, Sissoko and Gerrard have proven their worth to us - we know they're good enough. Mascherano hasn't been here that long but already we've seen glimpses of the side we can become with him in the squad.

And this was before we had signed the kid. Then when we did sign him, the remarks turned to petty slights at his hair and features. He was labelled a defensive midfielder and pigeon holed quite early on. All this comes together to set the scene for at least a part of the fanbase who already had prejudices before he had kicked a ball for us.

If we had stepped back from the immediate situation and appraised it reasonably, maybe he would have been greeted differently but at the time he was (supposedly) an unwanted gamble when we needed to strengthen key areas of the team. He bore the brunt of a split investment strategy and also the fact his arrival could signal the departure of Alonso to Barcelona, Sissoko to Barcelona or the Mascherano renewal falling through (all speculated at the time). All three were very popular players and either of these outcomes was unpalatable for the fans who believed it would be a step back from the precipice of a period of sustained greatness.

However, it was clear to many that Mascherano was a superior player to Momo in that role, and his absence (Momo’s) in the Champions League Final 2007 squad spoke volumes, as did Rafa’s tinkering of his position towards the end of the 06/07 season, leading him to make the following statement:

Quote from: Rafa Benitez
"But it was my decision, and some people may say I made a mistake, but I was sure we could have a good game with this system, or at least I was checking if it was a good idea. Now we know more about the players."

Source

It was clear a new role was beyond Momo and he was woefully out of his depth, which culminated in a shocking performance against ‘Boro where he couldn’t even seem to stay on his feet without falling over. To put this into context, we must acknowledge that since he sustained his eye injury he was never quite the same player for us anyway.

Steven Gerrard had been given the role behind Torres, as with foresight I believe Rafa identified at the time what came to be common knowledge to the English media a couple of years later, that there had been a natural death of the box to box midfielder as football tactics had evolved to accommodate the holding midfielder or pivot point. So not only did Lucas have to contend with emerging into a midfield comprising Gerrard, Mascherano and Alonso he also has to do this while adapting to the changing demands of continental football at the highest level.

Now at the same time, it is important to look at a parallel situation that was developing at Chelsea. They had spent £12 million after a dispute with Manchester United a season earlier on John Obi Mikel and United had responded by shelling out an enormous fee on another highly rated young player in Anderson. Now the similarity in Mikel and Lucas’s fortunes are eerily similar.

Mikel started his season in 06/07 and almost scored a goal early on, and the rebound was tucked in neatly by Drogba. Shades of Lucas almost scoring the winner in the derby, which had to be despatched by Kuyt which turned out to be the winning goal.

From then on Mikel had mixed fortunes with fouls, discipline and adapting to the holding position where Mourinho had chosen to use him. Lucas after a couple of promising introductions gave away a few silly fouls that led to goals his name became synonymous with ‘Jonah’.

Entering the 08/09 season Mikel had much more experience under his belt than Lucas and Makelele had left Chelsea for pastures new. He was thrown into the deep end with the injury situation to Essien. After coming under scrutiny and criticism from the Chelsea fans and question marks being raised over his transfer in the first place he performed tidily and adequately winning over many skeptics.

It’s also important to note at this point that Lucas had been the consummate professional at Liverpool, head down and working hard whilst Mikel had suffered from off the field problems and question marks over his personal lifestyle. It’s believed the club did think of offloading him after 06/07, but he came back all the stronger for it.

During the 08/09 campaign everyone was looking for Lucas to really develop, and kick on and have a major impact in the first team. He hit a ceiling in his development as first team chances were rare and depended on injury; not to mention that the team was doing spectacularly well and any changes made fans paranoid that the winning momentum would be lost. His time at Liverpool was interrupted by a visit to the Olympics and when he came back, he struggled to acclimatise to the premier league again which led to not bad performances per se, but ones that stood out in a team that was playing extremely well. It culminated in him being booed from the pitch when being substituted against Fulham. Lucas was apologetic while the manager was bullish in his defence:


Quote from: Lucas Leiva
"I am trying to get some more minutes on the pitch, but it is difficult," he told BBC Radio Merseyside.

"I am always speaking to the manager. He says I'm young, but that I'm much better than last season."

He added: "Players such as Javier Mascherano, Xabi Alonso and Steven Gerrard are all ahead of me."

Quote from: Rafa Benitez
'People just don't know how good Lucas is. He is a fantastic player, he was captain of his club side at 19 and has already won full caps with Brazil.

'Not just any country, but Brazil. He has captained their Under-21s and their Olympic team.

'He has a very good mentality. When you talk of Brazilian players you know they are skilful with ability. But Lucas is a worker and has a very good approach.

'He can tackle, he can pass the ball and he can win in the air. He is still a very young player learning to live in a different country.

"He is competing against Mascherano, the captain of Argentina, one of the best players in the world in Steven Gerrard and Xabi Alonso, a champion of Europe.

"I think it is difficult for a young player to compete with them, but that shows the quality in our midfield."


At this point Rafa refused to wrap him up in cotton wool and Lucas refused to hide. He ended the season in decent form being part of the team that thrashed United 4-1 at Old Trafford and also a goal scorer in the memorable match against Chelsea at Stamford Bridge that ended up 4-4 (7-5 agg). Statistics comparing the relative success of the midfield pairings were in fact actually quite negligible in their difrference:

Code: [Select]
           G W       D      L win %age

Alonso, Mascherano           23 15 6 2 65.22
Alonso, Gerrard         11 7 4 0 63.64
Lucas, Mascherano            10 6 4 0 60.00

A season later in 09/10, Lucas was going to find himself in a very similar situation at Liverpool as Mikel did in 08/09. A key midfielder had left In Xabi Alonso, and his replacement (Alberto Aquilani) was going to have major injury problems (a la Essien) for most of the season. He quickly got a run of sustained games that had not happened before and visible development was apparent. He went from strength to strength and towards the latter stages of Europe competition was quietly asserting himself on the Europa League (or the Europa Leiva).

Thanks to modern day tools available to fans, those who have rallied behind him (since the son of Neville Neville denied him a first goal that would have gone down in folklore) most of the myths about him have been comfortably dispelled. ‘He only passes sideways’, ‘he constantly gives fouls away’, ‘he has no range’, ‘he has no discipline’. For every one swatted aside another fallacy would rear its head, and need to be disproved although most rebuttals fell on deaf, prejudiced ears anyway.

He walked away from the 09/10 season with the young player of the year award (voted for by fans) and things were looking up for him. A new manager came in and gave him the captains armband pre season.

And then a familiar tale in his story. It looked as though he had no future here again. Branded ‘lazy’ by the manager and frozen out from the first team, he remained quiet and worked hard in training, again seizing his chance when it came. He has since formed a very effective midfield partnership with Raul Meireles. His name is now a mainstay on the team sheet, and this is where his story culminates. From all the flack he has taken, from all the obstacles and prejudices placed in his way, this Latin American midfielder has developed and intelligently made himself indispensable to our midfield by adapting to a modern continental position.

If there is one player who epitomises what a Liverpool player is it is Lucas, at a time when there is a streak of petulance and attitude running through the more senior ranks. With the new strategy, it wouldn’t surprise me if Lucas becomes the very epitome of the future of our club, and his story will hopefully galvanise the support in taking a step back when other players are brought in that don’t have an immediate impact.

You look at the other options we have in our squad and none are as disciplined in the role he does. Gerrard is a free role player, Poulsen is (or should be) a ball chaser, Meireles is a wandering player. Lucas is now that metronome that sits in midfield for us. He keeps things quietly ticking over and liberates his partner. I’m not sure it’s a position many fans foresaw for him and you can sometimes see his eagerness to get involved in a more attacking sense leaking out but by-the-by he is the stable platform in our engine room.

From the shadows he has slowly but surely emerged as an ever present in midfield. His presence has grown and many would prefer to see him keep his place than see Gerrard take up either berth of central midfield now. He is still only 23 and with the obstacles that created the ceiling he struggled to consistently break out from, the sky now appears to be the limit. Here's hoping to a great 2011 for him.



« Last Edit: December 31, 2010, 02:13:10 PM by lachesis »

Offline filthy1980

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2010, 02:07:35 PM »
great post well research

what i've noticed this season that i didn't before is how well he reads the game

everytime there is a loose ball in either defence of attack lucas is the one either challenging for it or backing up the player that is, doesn't have the pace masch had to cover positions but because he reads the game, he moves earlier and get into position, similar to how cambiasso did for inter last season

Offline Matt8Pie

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2010, 02:08:06 PM »
Great post, mate. This bit reigns so true:

Quote
If there is one player who epitomises what a Liverpool player is it is Lucas

We need to make sure he is in the team for years to come. He has a great story of determination and a never-say-die attitude and not only is that evident in his character, but also the way he plays on the pitch.

Commitment, passion, pride, humility, effort, class...gotta love Lucas.

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Offline matthew45

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2010, 02:09:37 PM »
I think that's a lovely piece of prose and I find it hugely embarrassing that Lucas noticed how much people disliked him and criticised him - so much so, that I probably go out of my way to praise him whenever I can.
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Offline supaerheraw

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2010, 02:14:21 PM »
Still, there are people who thinks he is average.
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Offline sneakyg

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2010, 02:18:53 PM »
Lucas is not a good enough footballer for us, regardless of his attitude, limited development in past season etc,  I have not seen enough to suggest that he will be anything better than an average player.

He would not get into another top european midfields starting team in my opinion.

He has played well for him in a few games this season, but id have loads of other premiership midfielders over him - players that no one would want us to purchase or re-purchase.

He seems like a nice person and someone who wants to do well and improve etc, but talk is cheap


Offline filthy1980

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2010, 02:19:07 PM »
Still, there are people who thinks he is average.

i think it boils down to your tactical intelligence and understanding of the game, if you can see the tactical idiosyncrasies you can see the benefit of lucas


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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2010, 02:21:58 PM »
i think it boils down to your tactical intelligence and understanding of the game, if you can see the tactical idiosyncrasies you can see the benefit of lucas

Yup. And sadly, the majority of fans can only see how the ball is played, not why the ball is played or what the player does off the ball.
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Offline Caston

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2010, 02:24:24 PM »
Lucas is not a good enough footballer for us, regardless of his attitude, limited development in past season etc,  I have not seen enough to suggest that he will be anything better than an average player.

He would not get into another top european midfields starting team in my opinion.

He has played well for him in a few games this season, but id have loads of other premiership midfielders over him - players that no one would want us to purchase or re-purchase.

He seems like a nice person and someone who wants to do well and improve etc, but talk is cheap

Wow just shut up.

Offline Keens

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2010, 02:25:03 PM »
Definely agree, Lucas has fantastic mentality!
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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2010, 02:25:49 PM »
Top player with a superb mentality, getting better every season.

Still massively worried that we're looking to sell him though. I don't understand why nobody seems to want to tie him down to a long term contract. We tried to ship him out in the summer, that didn't happen fortunately, and now that he's having his best season to date he should be given a new contract. He hasn't been, and that's very worrying.
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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2010, 02:26:58 PM »
He has played well for him in a few games this season, but id have loads of other premiership midfielders over him - players that no one would want us to purchase or re-purchase.

Come on then, give us all a fucking laugh. Which other prem midfielders would you have over him?
I trust the King, but if we lose a few more on the trot now - he may have to step aside, and we have to purchase another manager in the middle of the season. If we are relegated, this could be the end of our ambitions to win any title the next 100 years.

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2010, 02:27:07 PM »
I've always liked Lucas. Perhaps when others have left, people will appreciate him more.
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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2010, 02:30:30 PM »
Lucas is not a good enough footballer for us, regardless of his attitude, limited development in past season etc,  I have not seen enough to suggest that he will be anything better than an average player.

He would not get into another top european midfields starting team in my opinion.

He has played well for him in a few games this season, but id have loads of other premiership midfielders over him - players that no one would want us to purchase or re-purchase.

He seems like a nice person and someone who wants to do well and improve etc, but talk is cheap


It certainly is, I bet that load of rubish didn't cost much
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Offline robgomm

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2010, 02:31:11 PM »
He's done well this season overall, appears to be improving the technical side of this game a bit. He's always had a spirit and an excellent work ethic. Not sure if he'll reach the top rank of players but he's earned his place.

Offline miakeks

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2010, 02:33:23 PM »
Great Post. *thumbs up*
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Offline joe ®

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2010, 02:34:45 PM »
One thing he still needs to work on is the speed of his decision making. Since he joined he's often taken a split-second too long to release the ball, especially when passing the ball into the final third or in behind a defence. It's like he often sees the forward pass, second-guesses whether to actually play it (by which time the chance is gone) and then moves it sideways or backwards instead, as a safety-first option.

Now that's not terrible in a defensive midfielder of his technical ability because it means we keep the ball, but I think he has the potential to be more than just a defensive midfielder for us if he learns to trust his instincts a little more. He has fantastic technical ability and I think if he went with his gut instincts a little more we'd see a new attacking dimension to his play.

Offline oovavu

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #17 on: December 31, 2010, 02:36:58 PM »
Brilliant article, a good player with a defiant attitude towards his naysayers, of which I was one, I'm an ignorant fuck at the best of times.

Only issue I have is he's looking the best of a bad bunch, whether he can continue his upward curve whilst in a PL winning/challenging team (may be a while I know) is another thing. I'm getting a strong feeling thats not going to be the case though and will probably thrive in a team full of stars and confidence.

Offline sneakyg

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #18 on: December 31, 2010, 02:40:53 PM »
Wow just shut up.

Xabi Alonso, Stevie Gerrard, Mash, Hamann, Redknapp etc........Lucas is not in their league


Offline R.A.La

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #19 on: December 31, 2010, 02:41:09 PM »
Lucas is not a good enough footballer for us, regardless of his attitude, limited development in past season etc,  I have not seen enough to suggest that he will be anything better than an average player.

He would not get into another top european midfields starting team in my opinion.

He has played well for him in a few games this season, but id have loads of other premiership midfielders over him - players that no one would want us to purchase or re-purchase.

He seems like a nice person and someone who wants to do well and improve etc, but talk is cheap



Well thought out response that lad.

Now I suggest you take your head from up your arse and actually watch the lad play. If you can't see what Lucas brings to the team then maybe this is not the sport for you, I dunno maybe darts would be more your level?

Lucas will a starter for his national team for years to come, and potentially Brasil captain.

Just remember this when in the future you see him lifting the world cup and moan about how average he is.

Not a fucking patch on the likes of cattermole is he?

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Offline Sevo

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #20 on: December 31, 2010, 02:43:09 PM »
I remember when the media were constantly slagging Lucas and he'd been booed by a select band of morons, Rafa came out and stood by his player. Rafa's loud "He's a fantastic player" was seized upon by the media as another way to hammer Rafa. Rafa wasn't bothered, he was his player, a Liverpool player, so he stood up for him. Compare that to Hodgson's attacks on players - no wonder they don't perform for him.

Offline Mikuss

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #21 on: December 31, 2010, 02:43:40 PM »
Good post, I can't blame anybody who questioned the signing of him originally as I was part of that. He's come on leaps and bounds since then and I'm always one to defend his contribution. His attitude towards the game is one for any young player to look up to.

Offline Guz-kop

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #22 on: December 31, 2010, 02:44:39 PM »
Xabi Alonso, Stevie Gerrard, Mash, Hamann, Redknapp etc........Lucas is not in their league



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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #23 on: December 31, 2010, 02:47:14 PM »
LUCAS IS BOSS.

I, for one thing, am glad myself and a few others no longer have to defend Lucas against this forum. Good on you RAWK!
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Offline Sevo

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #24 on: December 31, 2010, 02:50:44 PM »
Xabi Alonso, Stevie Gerrard, Mash, Hamann, Redknapp etc........Lucas is not in their league

Rednapp? He was an overhyped tart. I watched his whole carrer at Anfield and regarded him as always flalttering to decieve. The rest yes, although at 23 Lucas has bags of potential. Given how he's come on in just a year is very encouraging. Top bloke as well - I doubt he's he prostituting himself to Sky like Rednapp does every week.



Offline sneakyg

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #25 on: December 31, 2010, 02:51:44 PM »
WOW....im now waiting for the Ngog is better than Torres post and the id rather have kuyt than ronaldo and it will all make sense

Offline new-red

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #26 on: December 31, 2010, 02:53:28 PM »
LUCAS IS BOSS.

I, for one thing, am glad myself and a few others no longer have to defend Lucas against this forum. Good on you RAWK!

Me and you both. Been behind the lad since day one and in the early years it was impossible to convince anyone. Now we don't have to say a fucking word. My favorite past rawk thread is the 'in support of Lucas thread'.
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Offline Matt8Pie

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #27 on: December 31, 2010, 02:53:44 PM »
Lucas will a starter for his national team for years to come, and potentially Brasil captain.

Just remember this when in the future you see him lifting the world cup and moan about how average he is.

I would love to see that happen for him and out of all the players in our squad, can't think of any more deserving than Lucas at this point in time.
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Offline new-red

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #28 on: December 31, 2010, 02:55:23 PM »
WOW....im now waiting for the Ngog is better than Torres post and the id rather have kuyt than ronaldo and it will all make sense

I would usually post some biting criticism but You're not even worth it mate.
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Offline Sevo

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #29 on: December 31, 2010, 02:55:38 PM »
WOW....im now waiting for the Ngog is better than Torres post and the id rather have kuyt than ronaldo and it will all make sense

It's all making sense now Roy - go and have a nap.

Offline wheresnemeth

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #30 on: December 31, 2010, 02:55:43 PM »
One thing he still needs to work on is the speed of his decision making. Since he joined he's often taken a split-second too long to release the ball, especially when passing the ball into the final third or in behind a defence...

I can't understand why people are always looking for the quick release. I see Stevie doing it often and most of the time it's that kind of ball that gets intercepted. Sometimes it's better to wait for the right time to release the ball rather than give it away cheaply.
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Offline Frank.

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #31 on: December 31, 2010, 02:56:01 PM »
I fucking love Lucas

Offline soxfan

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #32 on: December 31, 2010, 02:57:34 PM »
Well written piece lachesis. Thank you.  :)

Offline Chazz

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #33 on: December 31, 2010, 02:59:49 PM »
Excellent post Lachesis...Lucas should be tied down with a long term contract.

Offline Gnurglan

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #34 on: December 31, 2010, 03:02:59 PM »
It was always difficult for him when he had to compete with Mascherano, Alonso and Gerrard. While he wasn't spectacular, he always did a solid job. And it's been very impressive the way he's dealt with the negative press. Can't remember the game now, but it was a recent one where I kept an eye on his pass completion and it was next to perfect. Will be interesting to see if he can take yet another step up. I think he can, because of the way he's responded to critique so far has been very impressive. In a way it compares to Carra's early years. He fought and saw off his competitors one after another, made the starting lineup game after game until he was ever present.

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Offline zERo

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #35 on: December 31, 2010, 03:03:57 PM »
Lucas is to be a legend, he needs a manager who sees his potential
Only thing that is constant is the change, learn to live with it, move on

Offline tubby

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #36 on: December 31, 2010, 03:06:22 PM »
Lucas does look like he's having more and more of an influence on our play and is definitely improving.  But all this is coming as the team is steadily declining.

People were getting on his back when we had a midfield of Gerrard, Alonso and Mascherano, but now he's competing against/playing with Poulson, Spearing and Meireles.  Gerrard clearly isn't the force he was over a season ago, and those other 3 aren't in the same league as Alonso and Mascherano. For me, this is why he's starting to shine a lot more.

Kudos to him for knuckling down and getting on with it, though - I don't doubt his tenacity and his backbone, I just wonder if he'd still look as good as he currently does if he were playing in a fully functioning football team, performing at the top of their game.
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Offline new-red

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #37 on: December 31, 2010, 03:08:10 PM »
Lucas is to be a legend, he needs a manager who sees his potential

There just happens to be one walking around Liverpool somewhere. The name escapes me though...
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Offline red_pete

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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #38 on: December 31, 2010, 03:08:23 PM »
WOW....im now waiting for the Ngog is better than Torres post and the id rather have kuyt than ronaldo and it will all make sense

I'll be glad when school starts again.


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Re: How Lucas Leiva became a Liverpool player
« Reply #39 on: December 31, 2010, 03:09:05 PM »
Very good post
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