Author Topic: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal  (Read 95273 times)

Online Red Berry

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2120 on: August 26, 2021, 10:02:42 am »
 :D

<a href="https://youtube.com/v/GrYeD91kVKg" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://youtube.com/v/GrYeD91kVKg</a>
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Offline oldfordie

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2121 on: August 26, 2021, 12:47:55 pm »
:D

<a href="https://youtube.com/v/GrYeD91kVKg" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://youtube.com/v/GrYeD91kVKg</a>
Brilliant  :) Hammer all of them or it will happen again in the future.
Shocked by how bad some of those Lawyers are, how many people did they let down badly in the past by putting up a weak defence which was easy to dismiss in court.
One of those Lawyers argued he only read the document submitted to the court for 1 hour on the morning it was presented to the court, he argued this as his defence. :-[  :o
Judge tore him apart, you took 1 hour to read a approx 804 page legal document before presenting it to this court as factual evidence. that alone should mean disbarment.
Ooops. would have been better to have said nothing, his days in court are over.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2021, 12:49:30 pm by oldfordie »
@IanMaher7
Any chance we could replace this government with EU workers on temporary visas?

Offline jambutty

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2122 on: August 26, 2021, 01:04:34 pm »
Business Insider
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Judge rules that Sidney Powell and Lin Wood engaged in 'historic and profound abuse' of legal system, approves punishment
cdavis@insider.com (Charles Davis)  13 hrs ago


A US judge has ruled that the pro-Trump attorneys who sued Michigan officials over false claims they broke state election law and manipulated the vote will have to pay the defendants' legal fees and face sanctions over unethical behavior.

The decision stems from a lawsuit filed by the Sidney Powell and L. Lin Wood, among others, following former President Donald Trump's defeat in the 2020 election. President Joe Biden won Michigan by more than 155,000 votes in what state and national officials described as an election that was "the most secure in American history."

In a scathing ruling issued on Thursday, US District Judge Linda V. Parker said Powell and Wood had engaged in a "historic and profound abuse of the judicial process." Their claims - made against Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, the City of Detroit, and state election officials - were not just flimsy and unfounded, alleging a massive and implausible conspiracy to steal the election, Parker said, but actively harmful.

This case "was never about fraud - it was about undermining the People's faith in our democracy and debasing the judicial process to do so," the judge wrote.

Thursday's order grants the defendants' motion for unspecified sanctions, instructs the attorneys to pay any fees incurred by their litigation, and instructs the lawyers to complete at least 12 hours of legal education within the next six months on election law and pleading standards. The order also refers to them for potentially further disciplinary action, including disbarment.

Parker provided numerous instances of what she termed legal abuse. In one example, the lawyers claimed to have evidence that votes were changed by election workers. Asked for evidence, they presented an affidavit from a woman who said only that "I believe some of these workers were changing votes." Asked if that woman had actually seen that, "The Court was met with silence."

In another instance, the judge noted that the lawyers claimed ballots were run through tabulation machine more than once - and that there is no legal reason to do so. "But bafflingly, Plaintiff's counsel did not offer a cite to the law violated," the judge wrote. In fact, however, there are a "myriad of reasons" why ballots might be run through a machine several times, such as if the reader is jammed.

The same inability to present evidence presented itself when the lawyers were asked to support the claim that had been an irregular "dump" of votes for Biden. They could not, the court noted, "And speculation, coincidence, and innuendo could never amount to evidence of an 'illegal vote dump' - much less, anything else."

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/judge-rules-that-sidney-powell-and-lin-wood-engaged-in-historic-and-profound-abuse-of-legal-system-approves-punishment/ar-AANKun5?ocid=mailsignout&li=BBnb7Kz
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Online Red Berry

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2123 on: August 26, 2021, 01:45:56 pm »
Brilliant  :) Hammer all of them or it will happen again in the future.
Shocked by how bad some of those Lawyers are, how many people did they let down badly in the past by putting up a weak defence which was easy to dismiss in court.
One of those Lawyers argued he only read the document submitted to the court for 1 hour on the morning it was presented to the court, he argued this as his defence. :-[  :o
Judge tore him apart, you took 1 hour to read a approx 804 page legal document before presenting it to this court as factual evidence. that alone should mean disbarment.
Ooops. would have been better to have said nothing, his days in court are over.

Not quite. ;)
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Offline oldfordie

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2124 on: August 26, 2021, 01:49:42 pm »
@IanMaher7
Any chance we could replace this government with EU workers on temporary visas?

Offline jambutty

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2125 on: August 26, 2021, 10:14:19 pm »
CNN
Opinion: Trump's rally script fell apart
Opinion by Nicole Hemmer  2 hrs ago


Starting well before he ever got elected, former President Donald Trump had a talent for making his rallygoers boo. Just mentioning Hillary Clinton or CNN (or, near the end of his presidency, Fox News) would trigger a paroxysm of jeering from his supporters, who knew the role they played in punctuating his performances and happily did their part.

But at a recent rally in Alabama, the old script fell apart. Trump, after assuring the crowd that he supported "their freedoms," said that he recommended they take the Covid-19 vaccine. "It's good. I did it. Take the vaccines."

The crowd, which had been cheering Trump up to that point, suddenly lost its unitary glee. A portion of the rallygoers started to boo, not with Trump but at him. "No, that's OK. That's all right. You got your freedoms," he said, quickly seeming to recalibrate. "I just happened to take the vaccine." That way of putting it was quite a concession from Trump, who once boasted that he was "the father of the vaccine." Having touted it as "a medical miracle," he was now forced by a crowd of his own supporters to shrug it off as something he just happened to take.

Nor was he the only one getting boos that night. The crowd also lustily jeered Alabama Republican Rep. Mo Brooks, one of Trump's close allies, when he told them to move past the 2020 election (even while reiterating the false claim that it had been fraudulent).

At the rally, both Trump and Brooks were confronted with something Republican leaders have experienced -- but never quite learned from -- time and time again over the last 30 years: the more hard core and conspiratorial base of their movement can be leveraged for electoral gain, but they can never be contained or controlled. And no matter what loyalty elected leaders once commanded from this base, any politician who tries (once they've been unleashed) to restrain them or disabuse them of a conspiracy ultimately must tack even further right or risk being rendered irrelevant.

That reality has been a defining characteristic of the American right since the Reagan era. By the end of the 1980s, there was a fully-fledged conservative establishment in the US: a network of think tanks, politicians, donors and media personalities who wielded significant social and economic influence. The conservative wing of the GOP also finally wielded real political power: the presidency in the 1980s, Congress in the 1990s. That mattered, because it meant that the right was big enough to fight for power and had enough power to fight for.

The base, too, now had new ways of amplifying its own preferences, with its issues and conspiracies amplified by a quickly-growing right-wing media that stoked political fights which served to further elevate GOP conservatives. This became clear in the 1990s, when Newt Gingrich, an innovative conservative legislator with enormous political appetites, helped push out then-Minority Leader Bob Michel, setting himself up to become Speaker when a wave of conservative legislators flooded into Congress in the 1994 midterm elections. Gingrich relied heavily on his relationships with media personalities like Rush Limbaugh to motivate a conservative base outraged at the Clinton administration and convinced that the White House was a hive of murderous conspiracies.

But no sooner had Gingrich taken power than those new legislators began carving out a space for themselves to his right. While Gingrich seemed to be taking obstruction to a new level when he forced a government shutdown in 1995-1996 (then the longest in US history), a caucus of further-right representatives opposed his efforts to reopen the government once it was clear that the effort had backfired. (Gingrich vowed not to campaign for anyone who opposed him, though ultimately relented in an effort to retain his majority).

Supported by conservative media and the Clinton conspiracy complex, these ultraconservatives pushed impeachment well before Gingrich himself was ready to pursue it. And for all the conservative policies he managed to pass with Clinton's support, Gingrich faced a faction of conservative lawmakers who attacked him for his willingness to compromise and cheered his resignation after the 1998 midterms.

President George W. Bush faced the same dynamics. His 2004 reelection campaign catered heavily to a base that mocked and mischaracterized his opponent John Kerry's military service and flocked to the polls to oppose marriage equality. Bush and his team did not understand how captive he was to that base's anger until he began his push for immigration reform during his second term. The administration was stunned by how immediate and virulent the backlash was -- what was meant to be his signature legislation only served to reveal how little control he had over his party's base.

This pattern of creating and then losing control of a monster was also on display with the tea party. Born in response to the election of President Barack Obama and the global financial crisis, the movement re-energized a flagging Republican Party, helping to secure a landslide in the 2010 midterm elections while also shifting it sharply right. Party leaders like Speaker John Boehner gleefully embraced their new majority, eager to use their victories as leverage in negotiations with Obama, as Gingrich had with Clinton. In his first week as Speaker, he warned them that they would have to shift tactics in office, saying, "Campaigning is different than governing."

But the tea party caucus disagreed. Texas Republican Rep. Louie Gohmert, for example, lobbied for legislation requiring presidential candidates to release their long-form birth certificates, injecting the birther conspiracy (so relentlessly flogged by Trump) into Congress.

Boehner found he could use the new caucus to obstruct the Obama agenda and endlessly investigate events like the embassy attack in Benghazi, Libya -- but could not get the legislators to actually legislate. He watched as budget deals and debt-ceiling votes and immigration reform all fell apart. "The far-right knuckleheads would refuse to back the House leadership no matter what," he wrote in his memoir, "but because they were 'insurgents' they never had the responsibility of trying to actually fix things themselves." He finally gave up, resigning in the middle of his term in 2015.

Trump took a different approach. Rather than trying to appeal to the party's base, he sought to embody it. He could do this because, unlike Gingrich, Bush and Boehner, he was not part of the conservative establishment: he targeted it, presenting himself as an outsider at war not just with liberals and Democrats but with conservative and Republican leaders. There seemed to be no space between Trump and the more wild-eyed parts of the party's base; in fact, he dragged the rest of the party to the base's positions, commanding an unsettling and nearly universal loyalty for the party as he did.

Yet even that has proven not to be enough to contain the right-wing base of the party or lead it to compromise. Seldom has that base had to choose between Trump and their favorite conspiracies. But as the response at the rally showed, if forced to choose, a good portion of the base would abandon Trump.

That does not mean that Trump is suddenly on the outs. He has always been more of a political lemming than a political leader, scrambling to meet the party's base where it's at. His onstage modulation suggests that he will continue to do so, as will other Republican leaders eying the 2024 election. For all the talk of Trump transforming the Republican Party, what he mostly did was realize who was really in charge of it.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/opinion-trump-s-rally-script-fell-apart/ar-AANMtNc?ocid=msedgntp
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Offline jambutty

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2126 on: August 26, 2021, 11:44:36 pm »
The Daily Beast
The Real Story Behind the $25,000 Trump Donation to Pam Bondi
Jose Pagliery  13 hrs ago


It was the personally signed $25,000 check that landed then-presidential candidate Donald Trump in hot water—the check that sparked accusations that he had bribed Florida’s top prosecutor, Pam Bondi, with funds from his charity.

Much has been written about the suspicious timing of Trump’s 2013 gift to the Florida attorney general’s political campaign. But contrary to previous claims from Trump’s presidential campaign and company executives, new records acquired by The Daily Beast show that Trump Organization employees were explicitly told this was a donation to a political group, and emails show that Trump’s own executive assistant had met in person with Bondi’s finance director in New York City.

In its 2018 case against the Trump Foundation, the New York attorney general noted how Trump broke the law by using his charity to fund Bondi’s political group. And the charity was ultimately dissolved after a state judge found Trump had “breached his fiduciary duty” to the charity in other ways, behavior that the AG’s office called a “shocking pattern of illegality.”

The donation occurred just as Bondi was supposed to be considering joining New York’s investigation of the Trump University scam. And Trump himself got off easy. His campaign and foundation executives chalked it up to a mistake. The nonprofit didn’t realize it was a political group, the campaign told The Wall Street Journal. An ignorant company clerk hadn’t known, otherwise “we would have taken it out of [Trump’s] own personal account,” Trump Organization Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg told The Washington Post.

The conversation is laid out in an email exchanged on Aug. 28, 2013 between Bondi campaign finance director Deborah Ramsey Aleksander and Trump’s long-serving executive assistant, Rhona Graff.

Aleksander provided Graff with the name and federal tax identification number for “And Justice for All,” a political action committee associated with Ms. Bondi’s re-election campaign. Aleksander described it as an “ECO,” which stands for “Electioneering Communications Organization.”

graphical user interface, text, application, email: Daily Beast/Handout© Provided by The Daily Beast Daily Beast/Handout
“Again, it was a pleasure meeting you today!!! Thanks again for always being so responsive and wonderful to work with.” Aleksander wrote to Graff. “Let Mr. Trump know that we are SO VERY thankful for his commitment of 25k and If he wants to make it 50k, that’s perfectly acceptable. :) Seriously, thanks again for everything!!!”

In a subsequent email sent exactly two weeks later on Sept. 11, 2013, Aleksander mentioned their previous meeting in New York City and provided Graff with a copy of And Justice for All’s Internal Revenue Service W-9 form, which lists the group’s “federal tax classification” as a “political organization.”

Two days later, Trump sent Bondi the check with a signed letter that misspelled her name as “Pam Biondi” and read, “Dear Pam: You are the greatest!”

The Daily Beast showed these documents to Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a government watchdog group that filed the initial complaint that exposed this entire ordeal. Jordan Libowitz, the CREW communications director who led this project, called the emails “a smoking gun.”

“It kind of blows up their whole story,” Libowitz said. “The Trump Organization staffers knew they were making this political donation. There are no questions about it. There is no ambiguity.”

The Trump Organization did not respond to questions about the matter on Wednesday. Bondi, who is now listed as a partner at the Washington offices of the lobbying firm Ballard Partners, did not respond to a request for comment, neither did Aleksander, who lists herself as an independent fundraising consultant for Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL).

The emails obtained by The Daily Beast also cast doubt on another explanation given by the Trump Organization when this matter came under public scrutiny in 2016.

At the time, finance executives claimed that a series of blunders allowed the funds to be drawn from the Trump Foundation and led to the charity incorrectly identifying the recipient on annual tax forms submitted to the IRS.

According to the Trump Organization, a clerk erred by using an outdated list of charities to identify a non-political nonprofit in Utah also called “And Justice for All.” And staff made another mistake when they tallied up donations on the charity’s 990 tax form and listed yet another nonprofit in Kansas called “Justice for All.”

But these emails show that Bondi’s campaign staff twice provided the Trump Organization the correct group’s Federal Employer Identification Number, which does not match the Utah or Kansas nonprofits.

“I don’t understand how you could be this sloppy, even for people working for Donald Trump,” Libowitz said.

The check was dated Sept. 9, 2013, nearly two weeks after Trump company staff were told that the group was related to electioneering. The check appeared to be cut two days before Bondi’s campaign sent over the IRS form, but it was still sent anyway.

The ordeal revealed how the Trump Foundation was essentially an empty vessel that relied entirely on the staff at the for-profit Trump Organization. To get answers about how the check was erroneously cut from the charity, for example, New York Attorney General investigators had to question Jeff McConney, a high-ranking accountant at the Trump Organization. During a confidential 2017 interview, McConney told an investigator he “probably didn't know at that time that we probably shouldn't be using foundation funds for this type of thing.”

“We made a mistake,” McConney said.

The emails between the Trump Organization and the Bondi campaign were obtained by The Daily Beast via a public records request to the New York Attorney General, which has conducted multiple investigations into Trump corporate entities over the years.

Under Eric T. Schneiderman in 2016, that office helped win a $25 million class action settlement from Trump University after the for-profit school was caught duping wannabe entrepreneurs and squeezing cash out of students seeking to learn Trump’s “art of the deal.” Then, in 2018, under Barbara D. Underwood, the office got the Trump Foundation to dissolve itself in the aftermath of a fishy fundraiser for veterans that got caught holding back donations and supporting his own political campaign.

Now, in 2021, current Attorney General Letitia James has teamed up with the Manhattan district attorney to indict the Trump Organization and its CFO, Allen Weisselberg, for criminal tax fraud. That case is ongoing.

As for the check itself, Bondi reportedly tried to return the donation—but that was rejected. She never did investigate Trump University, and a local prosecutor in Florida cleared her of wrongdoing.

Months after she left office in 2019, she joined the Trump team fighting his impeachment.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/the-real-story-behind-the-dollar25000-trump-donation-to-pam-bondi/ar-AANLnCt?li=BBnbfcL
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Online TSC

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2127 on: September 3, 2021, 10:47:28 pm »

Online John C

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2128 on: September 3, 2021, 11:08:11 pm »
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-58441174

‘QAnon Shaman’ pleads guilty.
Excellent news, hopefully the knobhead does at least the 51 months. But isn't there still something undecided in this. I can't remember what it is, but there's a potential twist to the final outcome? And it may impact on how others facing charges may plea.
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Offline leroy

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2129 on: September 9, 2021, 11:54:20 am »
Doesn't exactly fit the thread but...

https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/trump-general-lee-statue-afghanistan-civil-war-1222487/

Quote
If only we had Robert E. Lee to command our troops in Afghanistan, that disaster would have ended in a complete and total victory many years ago.

Offline jambutty

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2130 on: September 12, 2021, 07:39:43 pm »
One of Trump's idols.


Business Insider
More from Business Insider
Donald Trump spoke at a 9/11 'Moonies' conference organized by the widow of Reverend Sun Myung Moon, praising the controversial Unification Church
ashoaib@insider.com (Alia Shoaib)  4 hrs ago


On Saturday, Donald Trump spoke at a conference organized by Hak Ja Han Moon, the widow of Reverend Sun Myung Moon, the founder of the controversial Unification Church.

Reverend Moon founded the church in South Korea in 1954 before moving to the United States in 1971, and it has been widely described as a cult.

Donald Trump was a featured keynote speaker at the "Rally of Hope" event, which coincided with the 20th anniversary of 9/11.

In his speech, Trump said, "I want to thank the Universal Peace Federation and in particular Dr. Hak Ja Han Moon, a tremendous person, for her incredible work on behalf of peace all over the world."

"What they have achieved on the peninsula is just amazing. In just a few decades, the inspiration that they have caused for the entire planet is unbelievable, and I congratulate you again and again," Trump said about the couple.

Reverend Moon called himself a Messiah and claimed that he had been asked by Jesus Christ to continue his work on earth.

The controversial church, whose followers are colloquially referred to as "Moonies," gained notoriety for arranging mass weddings between strangers.

The group is still active around the world.

In his speech, Donald Trump also took the opportunity to take credit for improving the security situation in the Korean peninsula.

"Looking back today, it's easy to forget how dangerous the situation was when I was elected," Trump said.

"Missiles were flying, nuclear weapons were being tested, and powerful threats were being issued every single day."

"Under my leadership, the United States adopted a policy of unprecedented strength," Trump said.

Jim Stewartson, founder of the anti-disinformation organization The Think Project, wrote on Twitter that the event was "deeply harmful and deceptive."

"This is being pitched by a who's who of establishment extremists as some sort of peace mission to unify Korea," Stewartson wrote.

"In reality, it's dangerous propaganda whitewashing a dangerous cult."

Those who have left the group, including one of the Moon's daughters, have described experiencing abuse during their time in the church.

In a blog post, Steve Hassan, a former member of the church who is now a cult expert, described how the group indoctrinates members.

Hassan added on Twitter that the group has long-established ties with Donald Trump and the modern Republican party.

In 1991, Trump was reported to have been considering selling his Florida resort Mar-a-Lago to Reverend Moon, but the church leader later denied being interested in the property.

Other high-profile GOP figures, including former vice presidents Mike Pence and Dick Cheney, have also spoken at events organized by the group.

Hyung Jin "Sean" Moon, the son of the Moons, campaigned for Donald Trump and attended the Capitol insurrection on January 6.

He also formed an offshoot church called World Peace and Unification Sanctuary Church in Pennsylvania, which has made MAGA politics a central tenet.

The group famously worships while carrying AR-15 rifles and has a 40-acre compound in Texas that it says is a safe haven for "patriots."

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/donald-trump-spoke-at-a-9-11-moonies-conference-organized-by-the-widow-of-reverend-sun-myung-moon-praising-the-controversial-unification-church/ar-AAOmmcO?ocid=msedgntp
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Offline jambutty

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2131 on: September 15, 2021, 06:14:24 pm »
CNN
Donald Trump's mental health becomes an issue again
Analysis by Chris Cillizza, CNN Editor-at-large  1 hr ago


Here's a fact you may have missed amid all of the coverage of the allegations and revelations in the new book by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa: The top general in the country believed that President Donald Trump was in significant enough mental decline that he took countermeasures to ensure Trump didn't start a war with China on his way out the door.

Yes, that actually happened, according to "Peril." Here's the relevant passage:

"Woodward and Costa write that [Joint Chief Chairman Mark] Milley, deeply shaken by the assault, 'was certain that Trump had gone into a serious mental decline in the aftermath of the election, with Trump now all but manic, screaming at officials and constructing his own alternate reality about endless election conspiracies.'

"Milley worried that Trump could 'go rogue,' the authors write.

"'You never know what a president's trigger point is,' Milley told his senior staff," according to the book.

Think about that for a minute. Milley, the top military adviser to the president, a man who undoubtedly spent considerable time with Trump in this period of time, believed that he was in "serious mental decline" triggered by his election loss.

And here's the thing: Milley wasn't the only person who noticed a change in Trump's behavior in the wake of the election. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, a loyal ally of the President, felt the same way. Again, the Woodward/Costa book sheds light here:

"The book details a private call McCarthy had with Trump the night before Biden's inauguration. According to Woodward and Costa, McCarthy told Trump, 'I don't know what's happened to you in the last two months. ... You're not the same as you were for the last four years.'

"McCarthy then repeatedly pleaded with Trump to call Biden.

"'You've done good things and you want that to be your legacy. Call Joe Biden,' McCarthy said, according to the authors.

"'Do it for me,' the GOP leader continued. 'You've got to call him. Call Joe Biden.'"

So, not only the top general in the country but also one of the two top Republicans in Congress -- and a Trump ALLY -- believed that the election had changed something in Trump. And, at least in the case of Milley, believed that Trump's mental health had declined to the point where he needed to intercede with China so that a war didn't get started by an unhinged Trump.

That is, in retrospect, terrifying. Because it's not as though Trump has been the picture of consistency and normal mental behavior for the bulk of his first term. Quite the opposite. But that Milley and McCarthy believed that things had worsened in the final months of his presidency suggests that we may well have been closer to a catastrophe than anyone even thought. (And there were plenty of people -- particularly after January 6 -- that believed the potential for more disastrous outcomes was very real!)

But, it's more than terrifying in retrospect. Because Donald Trump isn't gone. Not even close.

"I said this many, many times on the campaign trail: we may have defeated Trump, but Trumpism is not dead in this country," said California Gov. Gavin Newsom in his victory speech on Tuesday night.

That is not a partisan statement. It is a fact.

Trump has a) never conceded the 2020 election to President Joe Biden and b) continued to push the Big Lie that the election was somehow stolen despite there being zero actual evidence to back up that belief.

As recently as Monday night, Trump was using the same blueprint to sow doubts about the California recall.

"Does anybody really believe the California Recall Election isn't rigged?," Trump asked in a statement sent from his Save America PAC. "Millions and millions of Mail-In Ballots will make this just another giant Election Scam, no different, but less blatant, than the 2020 Presidential Election Scam!"

This is not, then, a story about the mental health concerns about a former President. Rather it is about the mental health concerns leading officials have expressed about a man who is, without question, the leader of the Republican Party and the current 2024 front-runner to be the GOP nominee.

Which should concern all of us.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/donald-trump-s-mental-health-becomes-an-issue-again/ar-AAOtuL1?li=BBorjTa&ocid=mailsignout
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Offline Mumm-Ra

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2132 on: September 15, 2021, 07:52:35 pm »
^ Trump (via some press release) and Hannity are saying that Milley should be charged with treason for back-channeling China to warn them of a potential attack/threat of one. As far as I know they didn't address the reasons Milley did what he did  ::)

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2133 on: September 15, 2021, 07:54:46 pm »
^ Trump (via some press release) and Hannity are saying that Milley should be charged with treason for back-channeling China to warn them of a potential attack/threat of one. As far as I know they didn't address the reasons Milley did what he did  ::)


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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2134 on: September 16, 2021, 08:35:26 am »
So apparently Dan Quail may have saved US democracy (for now at least) after Pence called begging him for help to find a way to hand the election to Trump. Quail gave him an ice bucket of a reality check.
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2135 on: September 16, 2021, 10:30:45 am »
So apparently Dan Quail may have saved US democracy (for now at least) after Pence called begging him for help to find a way to hand the election to Trump. Quail gave him an ice bucket of a reality check.

All the detail in here:

https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/pence-quayle-trump-woodward-certify-election-1226335/
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2136 on: September 16, 2021, 01:17:33 pm »
CNN
Trump's Big Lie is changing the face of American politics
Analysis by Stephen Collinson, CNN  6 hrs ago


The Big Lie is already tainting the 2022 and 2024 elections.

Relentless efforts by former President Donald Trump and his true believers in politics and the media have convinced millions of Americans that Joe Biden is a fraudulent President who seized power in a stolen election.

This deep-seated suspicion of last November's vote, which threatens to corrode the foundation of US democracy, mirrors the message adopted by the ex-President months before he clearly lost a free and fair election to Biden.

It has immediate political implications -- the lie that the last election was a fix is already shaping the terrain in which candidates, especially Republicans, are running in midterm elections in 2022. And the widespread belief that Trump was cheated out of power is building the former President a 2024 platform to mount a GOP presidential primary bid if he wishes.

Longer term, the fact that tens of millions of Americans were seduced by Trump's lies about election fraud poses grave questions about the future of America's democratic political architecture itself. Ultimately, if a large minority of the population no longer has faith in rule by the people for the people, how long can that system survive? And if the will of millions of people is no longer expressed through voting, what other outlets are there? Already, the January 6 insurrection has shown what happens when aggrieved groups -- in this case incited by a massive lie -- take matters into their own hands.

Trump's great success in creating his own version of a new truth about the election and his still-magnetic talent for spinning myths into which his supporters can buy is revealed in a new CNN poll released Wednesday.

The survey finds that 36% of Americans don't think Biden legitimately got sufficient votes to win last November. On the one hand, that means a handy majority does believe Biden won fair and square. On the other, however, a restive one-third minority in a nation of 330 million can be a powerful and destructive force. Among Republicans, 78% believe Biden did not win the election and 54% believe that there is solid evidence to support such a view, according to the poll, even though no evidence exists and multiple courts and states and the US Congress certified a victory that Trump's Justice Department said was untainted by significant fraud. Among Republicans who say Trump should be the leader of the party, 88% believe Biden lost the election. And in a sign that many Americans think that the ex-President's efforts are causing more permanent damage, 51% say it is likely that elected officials in the US will successfully overturn the results of a future election because their party did not win.

Paradoxically, Republicans are more likely to say that democracy is under attack than Democrats. That is despite the fact that any fair reading of the last few years shows that Trump has repeatedly battered the pillars of the democratic political system. The twice-impeached ex-President abused power repeatedly, politicized the Justice Department and sided with tyrants rather than democratic leaders. When it was the will of the people that he be ejected from office, he tried to stay, came close to staging a coup and trashed the election that ended his presidency.

Such is the power of Trump -- and the conservative media propaganda machine that created an alternative reality for his followers -- that the President is able to reinvent the truth in plain sight, and get away with it. The former President effectively writes the script.

"I am not the one trying to undermine American democracy, I'm the one trying to save it. Please remember that," Trump said at a rally in Arizona in June that itself highlighted a sham audit orchestrated by Republicans of 2020 election votes in crucial Maricopa County that helped Biden win the state.

Most Americans don't spend much time pondering democracy and constitutional guardrails -- a subject that has become an obsession for Beltway media and lawmakers in the Trump era. The cost of health care, the pandemic, kids trying to get back to school, expiring unemployment benefits and eviction moratoriums, and a homelessness crisis highlighted by the California recall election are more likely to concern most people. But ultimately, such problems are harder to solve if the faith of the people in their political systems fails.

And the daily erosion of democratic standards -- thanks to Trump's lies and the actions of his Republican enablers on Capitol Hill -- can reach critical mass over time. The experiences of other nations -- in Eastern Europe, for instance -- that have seen democracy tarnished is that incremental damage adds up, and it becomes obvious only at a point when it is impossible to reverse.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom, fresh off his defeat of the recall effort that critics saw as the epitome of an undemocratic exercise, reflected on how political freedoms need to be protected from the likes of Trump, who had said the California election was "rigged" before the returns had even come in. The Democratic governor reached for a message that might be the building blocks of a broader attempt by his party to push back against the extremism of some Republicans.

"Democracy is not a football. You don't throw it around," Newsom said Tuesday night. "It's more like a, I don't know, antique vase. You can drop it and smash it in a million different pieces."

Trump is poised to reap the fruits of his own anti-democratic campaign. His lock on the party grassroots appears to give him a prohibitive advantage in the next presidential primary campaign if he decides to run. It's easy to imagine a presidential debate when Trump forces rivals to buy into his own false conceit that the 2020 election was stolen from him. There is no political incentive for any GOP rising star to get on the wrong side of Trump. Some, like the third-ranking Republican in the House, Rep. Elise Stefanik of New York, have already made the choice between the truth and their own skyrocketing careers, which can prosper in Trump's shadow.

Republicans who have challenged the ex-President and pointed out the reality of his authoritarian impulses, however, like ex-Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona or Wyoming's Rep. Liz Cheney, whom Stefanik ousted as conference chair, find that their political prospects darken.

The next presidential election is three years away and the political winds can change. And it's possible that GOP voters will tire of Trump's antics and seek a fresh face. Perhaps Trump's increasingly extreme position on election fraud would be counterproductive in a national election -- and create more momentum against him than it currently gives him in his own party.

Democracy on trial in the midterms
But there can be little doubt that the former President's assaults on democracy are helping to keep him politically relevant, and his capacity to create a false narrative in which he won is a tangible sign of his power.

Before the next presidential election, the impact of the Big Lie is already being felt in the run-up to the congressional and gubernatorial elections next year. Many of those races will be fought under conditions set by new voting laws passed by conservative legislatures that often discriminate against minority voters and are inspired by Trump's Big Lie. If the California recall election is any guide, Trump acolytes will go into the midterms warning that any Democratic victories, especially where mail-in voting is heavily used, will be fraudulent even though Republicans are predicted to do well.

The former President has also worked hard, using the carrot of his valuable endorsement, to ensure that GOP candidates up and down the midterm ballot buy into his face-saving and untrue narrative that he won the last election.

He has, for instance, endorsed Alabama's Rep. Mo Brooks, who is running for Senate and was a speaker at the infamous January 6 rally in Washington that incited the US Capitol insurrection. Last week, the former President endorsed Michigan state Rep. Steve Carra, who is mounting a primary challenge to Rep. Fred Upton, one of 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump over the mob attack on Congress earlier this year. In another of his many endorsements countrywide, Trump this week backed Kristina Karamo, a Republican running for secretary of state in the Wolverine State, praising her as "strong on Crime, including the massive Crime of Election Fraud." It was a move that underscored how, alongside the ideological gulfs between Republicans and Democrats, there is a new divide -- between political hopefuls who support democracy and those prepared to deny it.

It is a new dimension in American politics that has shocked many people who have been involved in it for years, and it is drawing grim historical analogies.

"I think about ... those democracies that were lost in the middle part, the early part of the 20th century where democracy was not adequately defended and authoritarian regimes rose," former Obama administration Attorney General Eric Holder told CNN's Wolf Blitzer on "The Situation Room" on Tuesday.

"And it wasn't because democracy was unpopular. You know, democracy was strong. But the reality is the defense of democracy was weak, and we cannot allow that to happen in this country."

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/trumps-big-lie-is-changing-the-face-of-american-politics/ar-AAOuRjK?li=BBnbfcL
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2137 on: September 17, 2021, 12:23:13 pm »
Business Insider
Then-CIA director Gina Haspel said Trump's post-election behavior was 'insanity' and he was 'acting out like a 6-year-old with a tantrum,' book says
gpanetta@businessinsider.com (Grace Panetta)  15 hrs ago


Then-Central Intelligence Agency director Gina Haspel vented to the US' top general that former President Donald Trump was "acting out like a six-year-old with a tantrum" in the wake of the 2020 election, according to a new book.

In addition to refusing to concede the 2020 election to President Joe Biden and pushing groundless an outlandish claims of election fraud, Trump fired (or tried to fire) a number of top officials - most prominently including Secretary of Defense Mark Esper on November 9.

"Yesterday was appalling," Haspel said in her November 10 conversation with Gen. Mark Milley, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, according to Bob Woodward and Robert Costa's forthcoming book "Peril."

"We are on the way to a right-wing coup. The whole thing is insanity. He is acting out like a six-year-old with a tantrum," Haspel, a 35-year veteran of the agency, said, with the authors writing that she, too, was afraid of being canned.

Milley assured Haspel that "we're going to be steady," according to the book. "Steady as a rock. We're going to keep our eye on the horizon. Keep alert to any risks, dangers. Keep the channels open."

"Peril" and other books on the final months of the Trump administration released this summer pull back the curtain on the chaotic final weeks after the 2020 election, with Trump's behavior alarming many senior officials.

In "Peril," Woodward and Costa reveal that Milley placed a call to his counterpart in China to tell him "that the American government is stable and everything is going to be okay" and that he would warn him if the US were to attack China.

One official, however, told Politico that the conversation was "grossly mischaracterized" in the book, and the Pentagon has defended Milley, with Pentagon spokesman John Kirby recently telling reporters that "it is not only common, it's expected that a chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff would continue to have counterpart conversations."

Wall Street Journal reporter Michael Bender's book, "Frankly We Did Win This Election: The Inside Story of How Trump Lost reported that then-Secretary of State Mike Pompeo also expressed concerns to at least one person that Trump would enter into a foreign conflict to try and stay in office after losing the 2020 election.

Trump's firing of Esper not only unnerved Haspel but alienated another top advisor, David Urban, who told the president's son-in-law and senior advisor Jared Kushner that it was "a dick move" that made Trump "look out of control," Bender's book said.

The book also says both Pompeo and Milley feared that the new officials brought into the Defense Department and White House after the 2020 election were conspiracy theorists and could even have "links to neo-Nazi groups.

"https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/then-cia-director-gina-haspel-said-trumps-post-election-behavior-was-insanity-and-he-was-acting-out-like-a-6-year-old-with-a-tantrum-book-says/ar-AAOwDiC?li=BBnb7Kz
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2138 on: September 19, 2021, 01:49:12 am »
Ahead of the Justice for J6 ( :duh) protests planned for DC this week.


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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2139 on: September 19, 2021, 08:57:33 am »
Unless the fat fuck croaks from chomping down too many cheeseburgers then a shit storm awaits us in 2024

And when it comes, you just know its going to be even more insane and conspiratorial than his last campaign

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2140 on: September 19, 2021, 02:11:55 pm »
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-58612965

Police outnumber the small number of attendees at a rally to support the pro-Trump rioters.

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2141 on: September 19, 2021, 02:15:58 pm »
It's kind of funny that the number of people who were charged for the January 6th attacks is bigger than the attendance of the rally... :lmao

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2142 on: September 19, 2021, 02:36:07 pm »
Ahead of the Justice for J6 ( :duh) protests planned for DC this week.



Starting to get dangerous this. It's like watching the T-1000 reassemble itself in the molten steel mill. He went quiet as fuck after Jan 6th because he was shitting himself over the very real prospect of being marched out of the Whitehouse in handcuffs. But now nothing has happened for eight months, he's starting to get his mojo back and really starting to push the "rigged 2020" angle.

The DoJ needs to grow a pair and announce some kind of direct investigation into him.  That, or New York needs to up the pace. Justice is glacial, and there's no telling what kind of damage may yet be done in the meantime. These domestic terrorists cannot be allowed to be repainted as martyrs or patriots by the GQP.
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2143 on: September 19, 2021, 04:16:59 pm »
Starting to get dangerous this. It's like watching the T-1000 reassemble itself in the molten steel mill. He went quiet as fuck after Jan 6th because he was shitting himself over the very real prospect of being marched out of the Whitehouse in handcuffs. But now nothing has happened for eight months, he's starting to get his mojo back and really starting to push the "rigged 2020" angle.

The DoJ needs to grow a pair and announce some kind of direct investigation into him.  That, or New York needs to up the pace. Justice is glacial, and there's no telling what kind of damage may yet be done in the meantime. These domestic terrorists cannot be allowed to be repainted as martyrs or patriots by the GQP.

It’s a mystery why he’s still free as a bird to continue spouting his nonsense.  I’d imagine in most other western democracies anyone who tried to overthrow an elected government would be chucked into prison.  Can you envisage Trump’s reaction if anyone had attempted an insurrection against his administration?  The perpetrator would’ve been whisked straight to Guantanamo.

While it does take time to build a legal case (assume that’s ongoing?) it’d be safer to lock him away while any process is pending.

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2144 on: September 19, 2021, 04:29:01 pm »
It’s a mystery why he’s still free as a bird to continue spouting his nonsense.  I’d imagine in most other western democracies anyone who tried to overthrow an elected government would be chucked into prison.  Can you envisage Trump’s reaction if anyone had attempted an insurrection against his administration?  The perpetrator would’ve been whisked straight to Guantanamo.

While it does take time to build a legal case (assume that’s ongoing?) it’d be safer to lock him away while any process is pending.
He's free because he can say what he likes as the US consider Free speach sacred. warped sense of values passed from generation to generation.

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https://twitter.com/RonFilipkowski/status/1439225130811539457
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2145 on: September 19, 2021, 07:03:30 pm »
It’s a mystery why he’s still free as a bird to continue spouting his nonsense.  I’d imagine in most other western democracies anyone who tried to overthrow an elected government would be chucked into prison.  Can you envisage Trump’s reaction if anyone had attempted an insurrection against his administration?  The perpetrator would’ve been whisked straight to Guantanamo.

While it does take time to build a legal case (assume that’s ongoing?) it’d be safer to lock him away while any process is pending.


Well I certainly get the argument for building a rock solid case. I guess you want all your ducks in a row with a guy like this. But waiting until there's an 80-90% chance of winning the case comes with its own risks.

I'd be more for arresting/charging him now and putting him out on bail, just as a spoiling tactic to disrupt his rhythm. It might rally people to his cause, but I would say it forces him to hire yet more lawyers, who's advice he will ignore, and also increases his legal jeopardy if he continues to spout this outright bollocks. Might even put the GQP under pressure too.
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2146 on: September 19, 2021, 07:22:48 pm »
Ahead of the Justice for J6 ( :duh) protests planned for DC this week.



Just… How is this sort of thing not automatically disqualifying when it comes to running for the highest offices in the land? 

I’ve said it before, but it’s worth repeating. I just don’t understand what it is about Donald Trump that people are willing to totally debase themselves and/or sacrifice themselves at his altar.  There’s nothing there, no real intelligence, no real acumen, no real values, no belief in anything other than Donald Trump and what’s best for Donald Trump.

It’s been proven a thousand times over that he doesn’t give a shit about anyone else, his voters, his staff, his acolytes. Yet still they’ll do anything and everything for him.  I’ll never understand.

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https://twitter.com/RonFilipkowski/status/1439225130811539457

I know the square root of fuck all about guns, but judging by the look on her face as that thing recoils I would hazard a guess that she’s never actually fired that weapon before…
« Last Edit: September 19, 2021, 07:27:36 pm by Kekule »

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2147 on: September 19, 2021, 07:39:00 pm »


I’ve said it before, but it’s worth repeating. I just don’t understand what it is about Donald Trump that people are willing to totally debase themselves and/or sacrifice themselves at his altar.  There’s nothing there, no real intelligence, no real acumen, no real values, no belief in anything other than Donald Trump and what’s best for Donald Trump.


It's a cult.

I'm no expert on any of this, but if I were to speculate, I think we're looking at some form of mutually abusive relationship, where you have multiple sides all using one or more of the others for their own ends. Trump gives a voice to those who feel angry, disaffected, disenfranchised by the mainstream, and above all the failures looking to blame others for their failures.

That statement, for example. It's not for the "persecuted" at all - the people who threw themselves on their sword for Trump, expecting pardons or legal fees. It's for those who are wavering; a piece of expertly crafted bullshit to once again make these individuals believe Trump has their back. He's gradually piecing his power base back together so he can try again.

Why this works on those who are comfortably well off and arguably highly intelligent compared to the majority of Trump's base I cannot say. My only guess is they see Trump as a vehicle of experience, and they get more out then what they put in.
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2148 on: September 19, 2021, 08:07:35 pm »
Just… How is this sort of thing not automatically disqualifying when it comes to running for the highest offices in the land? 

I’ve said it before, but it’s worth repeating. I just don’t understand what it is about Donald Trump that people are willing to totally debase themselves and/or sacrifice themselves at his altar.  There’s nothing there, no real intelligence, no real acumen, no real values, no belief in anything other than Donald Trump and what’s best for Donald Trump.

It’s been proven a thousand times over that he doesn’t give a shit about anyone else, his voters, his staff, his acolytes. Yet still they’ll do anything and everything for him.  I’ll never understand.

I know the square root of fuck all about guns, but judging by the look on her face as that thing recoils I would hazard a guess that she’s never actually fired that weapon before…
I can understand his appeal to some. how he's one of the few people who has the guts to say what we think. nothing new about that, all racists and Nationalists have admired politicians who legitimise their nasty views. am the same as yourself. really can't get my head around the blind wilful denial. the sickening double standards on all the issues. Lock her or him chants based on finger pointing while refusing to believe solid evidence that points to Trumps corruption and treason. the absurdity of looking at themselves as patriots while trying to overthrow their government. the list goes on and on. a few thousand people falling for this s.. is scary. we're talking millions though. frightening.
I wonder how many families Trumps torn apart. living with a CT Trump fanatic while hating Trump with a passion would be too much for many people.
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2149 on: September 19, 2021, 11:15:19 pm »
It is a cult. No doubt about it. It is mindblowing how many people have not only fell for the lies but 100% back him. It seems the majority of GOP are brainwashed, along with millions of followers. It's like the fucking twilight zone living here.

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2150 on: September 21, 2021, 09:14:07 am »
I can understand his appeal to some. how he's one of the few people who has the guts to say what we think. nothing new about that, all racists and Nationalists have admired politicians who legitimise their nasty views. am the same as yourself. really can't get my head around the blind wilful denial. the sickening double standards on all the issues. Lock her or him chants based on finger pointing while refusing to believe solid evidence that points to Trumps corruption and treason. the absurdity of looking at themselves as patriots while trying to overthrow their government. the list goes on and on. a few thousand people falling for this s.. is scary. we're talking millions though. frightening.
I wonder how many families Trumps torn apart. living with a CT Trump fanatic while hating Trump with a passion would be too much for many people.

It`s pretty simple: he`s their team leader and he sticks it to the other team on a daily basis. It doesnt seem to matter that he`s lost every election he`s been the figurehead for (even the one he `won`). He represents the people who want to be free to vent their baser sides; where America is a white, Christian, capitalist society and everyone else knew their place.

These people have ignored their very instincts: his appearance is obviously fake from that thing on his head, his orange make-up and enormous figure obscuring suits. His lies are transparent and easily refutable. His history is either ignored or unknown by his cult, any negatives are in fact lies made up by the media. There is decades of evidence of his criminality and debauchery, but that was all fabricated just in case one day he started pretending to be Christian republican and ran for office. It`s a cult & he is their Jim Jones in a red tie.
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2151 on: September 21, 2021, 12:34:10 pm »
Salon
Trump quietly unleashes his mob
Heather Digby Parton  21 hrs ago


There's been a ton of reporting and analysis on Bob Woodward and Robert Costa's new book, "Peril", most of it focusing on the final days of the Trump administration — which by all accounts were even more of a chaotic mess than we could see from the outside (and we saw plenty). The bizarre antics from the president and his henchmen regarding the election results were unprecedented and continue to this day.

But one of the most chilling quotes from the book that I've seen so far comes from this review of the book by history professor Eric Rauchway in the Washington Post. As we knew, Vice President Mike Pence tried every way he could to come up with a rationale to do Trump's bidding and refuse to ceremonially confirm the electoral count in the joint session of Congress on January 6th. On that morning, before the fateful rally that inspired the insurrection, Pence came to the White House to reluctantly tell his boss that he just didn't have the power to do that under the Constitution:

Gesturing at some of his supporters already gathered and shouting outside the White House, Trump asked, "Well, what if these people say you do?

When Pence demurred again, Trump mused, "wouldn't it almost be cool to have that power?"

As Rauchway points out, "the president was willing to find authority in the mob if he lacked it in the law." It's entirely possible that if the mob had succeeded in finding House Speaker Nancy Pelosi or the vice president or had been able to corner some of those elected officials in the Capitol that day, Trump would have gone along with it. All the recent books, including "Peril" have Trump watching the event unfold and being unmoved by exhortations to step in from everyone from his daughter Ivanka to House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, to whom he reportedly said, "well, Kevin, I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are."

That comment about the mob conferring the power to overturn the election results got me thinking about the timeline on Jan. 6 and it occurs to me that Trump only issued his pathetic video in which he said he loved the gathered rioters but implored them to go on home once it became clear that all the officials had gotten away safely and there was no longer any chance his supporters would succeed in finding them. He had waited to see if they could physically force the Congress to overturn the election.

As predicted, the "Justice forJ6" rally last Saturday was a non-event. More media showed up than protesters, largely because the organizer has no talent for organizing and the word on all right-wing social media was that the FBI was going to arrest everyone. As I noted earlier, Trump himself said it was a "set-up." But in case anyone wondered where he stood on the premise of this rally, which is that the federal authorities are unjustly holding peaceful protesters as political prisoners, he left no doubt when he issued his statement in solidarity. "Our hearts and minds are with the people being persecuted so unfairly relating to the January 6th protest concerning the Rigged Presidential Election. In addition to everything else, it has proven conclusively that we are a two-tiered system of justice."

ABC's Jonathan Karl reported on "This Week" that when he's interviewed Trump for his new book, it's clear that Trump has no regrets:

I was absolutely dumbfounded at how fondly he looks back on January 6th. He thinks it was a great day. He thinks it was one of the greatest days of his time in politics.

Trump is still flouting the law and openly condoning the violent insurrection. As Rauchway said, he "finds authority in the mob." He's always engaged in lurid rhetoric and has nudged his followers and police to beat protesters and the like. But starting with his calls to "liberate" states that were trying to mitigate the spread of the pandemic, he has been backing insurrectionist and vigilante activity. And his followers are listening.

We've seen threats and intimidation against government workers and public health officials for months. Congressional representatives are under constant threat having to hire private security and bodyguards. We are starting to see violence in everyday interactions between local officials and their constituents. School board meetings have become fraught with locals citizens yelling at officials that they know where they live and they will find them. Last week GOP Congressman Anthony Gonzales announced that he would not run for reelection in Ohio because ever since he voted to impeach Donald Trump after the insurrection he and his family have needed security due of the risk of violence from Trump supporters. Trump quickly put out a statement indicating his elation at the success of that intimidation:

The 9 he refers to are the other Republicans who voted to impeach him. He is using the "authority of the mob" to chase his perceived enemies in the GOP out of politics and to send a message to all the other Republicans that they will be subject to the same treatment if they cross him.

All the recent polls show Trump is as popular as ever with Republicans. His obsessive attention to his Big Lie seems to have hardened their attitudes with more of them believing he was cheated than believed it last January. The vast majority of his voters have lost faith in the electoral system to deliver a fair result and will likely not accept anything but a victory going forward, particularly if Donald Trump is on the ballot.

Rauchway's review of "Peril" features an unexpected insight into President Biden's view of Trumpism. He writes:

Biden regards the -ism, not the man, as the real threat; Trump put the nation in peril because he evoked and organized a darkness that was already there.

That darkness isn't going away. It is energized and stimulated by the strong threat of violence that is running through our politics. Like its leader Trump, it sees the "authority in the mob" as the best way to preserve its dominance in a culture it believes is slipping away. Biden is right that Trump is not the real threat. The threat is the violent beast he has unleashed and there isn't any obvious way to put it back in its cage. 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/trump-quietly-unleashes-his-mob/ar-AAODCSW?li=BBnbfcL
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2152 on: September 21, 2021, 02:29:42 pm »
The fat, corrupt, orange gobshite was beaten in no small part to the votes of black voters who determinedly battled through electoral obstacles put up by Repug scum.

The Repugs have doubled-down on efforts to create more obstacles, and disenfranchise more likely Democrat voters.

One part of me would love him to run again and get his oversized arse handed to him good style, but there's always the chance that the Repugs cheat & gerrymander their way to a Trump victory.

So the bigger part of me wants him facing criminal proceedings.

Obviously the ideal would be for the shitbag to get sent to prison with the rest of his scummy family. The cherry on the cake would be him witnessing his debt-laden business empire crumble and name totally despoiled, just before he slowly bleeds to death after being shanked.

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Offline Corkboy

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2154 on: September 21, 2021, 03:49:36 pm »
https://twitter.com/UrbanAchievr/status/1440062663967461387?s=20

John Eastman. You might think he would be an outcast after all that but not in today's Republican party. In fact, he is still a member in good standing of the Federalist Society, who brought you your three Trump SC judges, and has actually spoken at FedSoc events since Jan 6.

Which just goes to show you that American conservatives, even the "establishment" ones, simply do not give a fuck.

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2155 on: September 21, 2021, 04:16:29 pm »
John Eastman. You might think he would be an outcast after all that but not in today's Republican party. In fact, he is still a member in good standing of the Federalist Society, who brought you your three Trump SC judges, and has actually spoken at FedSoc events since Jan 6.

Which just goes to show you that American conservatives, even the "establishment" ones, simply do not give a fuck.


I think there's a realisation amongst top Repugs that overall in America, public support is pretty consistently now leaning Democrat - the Repugs have lost the popular vote in every single election since 1988 bar one (2004, when Bush was still riding that star-spangled military wave in the post-9/11 world).

It's only the vagaries of the electoral college system (and in House elections admittedly very effective gerrymandering) that gives them a chance.

With demographics continuing to drift away from natural Repug support (and the Democrats showing more ability to get out the vote of non-whites), I think they're getting desperate.

This is exacerbated by the Democrats inching further to the left (especially socially), with the popularity amongst progressives of charismatic leftish politicians like Sanders and AOC.

The Repugs are very much adopting the adage of desperate times demanding desperate measures.
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2156 on: September 21, 2021, 05:10:51 pm »
https://twitter.com/UrbanAchievr/status/1440062663967461387?s=20

Actually writing down “and this is how we intend to stage a coup” and circulating it before you actually try and stage said coup doesn’t seem like the smartest thing anyone has ever done.

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2157 on: September 21, 2021, 07:15:42 pm »
Actually writing down “and this is how we intend to stage a coup” and circulating it before you actually try and stage said coup doesn’t seem like the smartest thing anyone has ever done.

Thing is, this was widely reported at the time (just without all the insider detail). Multiple places were detailing various strategies in which Trump would attempt to steal it, and having multiple slates of electors was certainly covered to sow doubt in all the Republican-governed 'battleground' states that elected Biden and have all their EC votes removed from play, handing Trump victory. People didn't believe it then, but it's what they were doing.
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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2158 on: September 22, 2021, 10:16:21 am »
Actually writing down “and this is how we intend to stage a coup” and circulating it before you actually try and stage said coup doesn’t seem like the smartest thing anyone has ever done.

They didn't feel it was a coup. They're Republicans, they believe anything they want to do is fine.

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Re: Legal repercussions for Trump and his cabal
« Reply #2159 on: September 22, 2021, 03:37:45 pm »
Inevitable really. He robs her and her brother blind and then sues her for finding out about it.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/sep/22/donald-trump-sues-niece-new-york-times-tax-story



‘It’s desperation’: Trump sues niece and New York Times over bombshell tax story
Lawsuit alleges Mary Trump and NYT ‘were motivated by personal vendetta’ against him and a desire to push political agenda

Former US president Donald Trump has sued his estranged niece and The New York Times over a 2018 story about his family’s wealth and tax practices that was partly based on confidential documents she provided to the newspaper’s reporters.

Trump’s lawsuit, filed in state court in New York on Tuesday, accuses Mary Trump of breaching a settlement agreement by disclosing tax records she received in a dispute over family patriarch Fred Trump’s estate.

The lawsuit accuses the Times and three of its investigative reporters, Susanne Craig, David Barstow and Russell Buettner, of relentlessly seeking out Mary Trump as a source of information and convincing her to turn over documents. The suit claims the reporters were aware the settlement agreement barred her from disclosing the documents.

The Times’s story challenged Trump’s claims of self-made wealth by documenting how his father, Fred, had given him at least $413m over the decades, including through tax avoidance schemes.

Mary Trump identified herself in a book published last year as the source of the documents provided to the Times.

In a statement to NBC News, Mary Trump said of her uncle, “I think he is a loser, and he is going to throw anything against the wall he can. It’s desperation. The walls are closing in and he is throwing anything against the wall that he thinks will stick. As is always the case with Donald, he’ll try and change the subject.”

A Times spokesperson, Danielle Rhoads Ha, said the lawsuit “is an attempt to silence independent news organizations and we plan to vigorously defend against it”.

The Times’s coverage of Trump’s taxes, she said, “helped inform citizens through meticulous reporting on a subject of overriding public interest”.

One of the Times reporters, Craig, responded in a tweet: “I knocked on Mary Trump’s door. She opened it. I think they call that journalism.”

Trump is seeking $100m in damages.

Trump’s lawsuit alleges Mary Trump, the Times and its reporters “were motivated by a personal vendetta” against him and a desire to push a political agenda.

The defendants “engaged in an insidious plot to obtain confidential and highly-sensitive records which they exploited for their own benefit and utilized as a means of falsely legitimizing their publicized works,” the lawsuit said.

Trump filed his lawsuit almost a year to the day after Mary Trump sued him over allegations that he and two of his siblings cheated her out of millions of dollars over several decades while squeezing her out of the family business. That case is pending.

Mary Trump, 56, is the daughter of Donald Trump’s brother, Fred Trump Jr, who died in 1981 at age 42. Mary Trump was 16 at the time.

Trump’s lawsuit focuses only on the Times’s 2018 story, a Pulitzer Prize winner for explanatory reporting. It makes no mention of another Times scoop on Trump’s taxes last year, which found he paid no federal income taxes in 10 of the previous 15 years.

According to the lawsuit, Mary Trump came into possession of more than 40,000 pages of “highly sensitive, proprietary, private and confidential documents” through a legal case involving Fred Trump’s will.

The documents including financial records, accountings, tax returns, bank statements, and legal papers pertaining to Donald Trump, Fred Trump and their businesses, Trump’s lawsuit said.

In 2001, about two years after Fred Trump died, Mary Trump and other family members entered into a settlement agreement with confidentiality and non-disclosure clauses that barred them from sharing information about Fred Trump’s estate in, among other venues, newspaper stories, Trump’s lawsuit said.

The agreement also covered the estate of Fred’s wife, Mary Anne Trump, who died in 2000.

Trump, who bashed the Times repeatedly during his presidency as the “failing New York Times”, noted in the lawsuit that the 2018 article was viewed more online than any previous Times article and that the New York Times Company’s stock price jumped 7.4% the week it ran.

The Times’s story said that Donald Trump and his father avoided gift and inheritance taxes by methods including setting up a sham corporation and undervaluing assets to tax authorities.

The Times says its report was based on more than 100,000 pages of financial documents, including confidential tax returns from the father and his companies.

Mary Trump’s book, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man, debuted in the midst of Donald Trump’s re-election campaign last year. Donald Trump’s brother, Robert, tried unsuccessfully to have a court block the book’s publication, citing the 2001 settlement agreement.

Ruling in Mary Trump’s favor, a judge said the confidentiality clauses, “viewed in the context of the current Trump family circumstances in 2020, would ‘offend public policy as a prior restraint on protected speech”.

In the book, Mary Trump recounted providing the family financial records that underlaid the Times’ reporting. The book sold more than 1.3m copies in its first week and soaring to No 1 on the Times’s bestseller list.

In an interview connected with the release of the book, Mary Trump told ABC’s George Stephanopoulos she didn’t feel the non-disclosure agreement “mattered one way or the other because what I have to say is too important”

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