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Windows 11 to invalidate Intel CPUs older than 2017 (not sure about AMD)

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Riquende:
Out in the wild now that MS is replacing the "last ever" version of Windows (as 10 was trumpeted at the time). It's become apparent to people who are installing the tech preview for W11 that the OS requires a TPM 2.0, which only came in as standard on Intel CPUs from the 8th gen (Coffee Lake) onwards. Originally it was indicated that people with TPM 1.2 would be able to make an 'unrecommended' update but that apparently isn't the case.

Windows 10 support will run for a few years yet (I've read 2025) but after that people with older processors will be unable to get key security updates etc. Of course at that point any affected CPU will be getting on for 10 years old at least.

Personally I've got 3 7th gen i7 processors so apparently none of them will update but that's fine, I'm well past time to build a new machine and hopefully the volatility of component prices and availability will have reduced by then.

Red Berry:
Upgrading my PC stalled because it only had W7 on it so I would have needed to upgrade it just to run W10.  Now they're going to do it again with 11??  Piss off!

I really want to upgrade my old PC, but even though it's fine the case is from 2007 so no USB 3.0 connectors built into it.  I tell myself that's not really an issue as a new motherboard will come with them, but with all this crap I'm not sure it's even worth my time.  I may as well just buy a pre-built one.

ChaChaMooMoo:
I use a 6th gen i5 chip with 12GB ddr3 ram. So I will most likely be affected by it.

My beef with that decision is, I still only use 10-15% of my chip's capacity. Except while opening CAD data, when I go up to 55-60%. And I haven't overclocked it.

I still think the chipset is an able chipset that can handle the demand of a heavier OS should the need arise.

I don't think Microsoft should base this upgrade based on the chipset age, rather base it on the ability of the chipset, which even the 4th or 5th generations can.

Granted I will be 8 years on this chip in 2024. But if its still working, why change? Or, in this case, be forced to change?

Red Berry:

--- Quote from: ChaChaMooMoo on June 26, 2021, 06:46:45 pm ---I use a 6th gen i5 chip with 12GB ddr3 ram. So I will most likely be affected by it.

My beef with that decision is, I still only use 10-15% of my chip's capacity. Except while opening CAD data, when I go up to 55-60%. And I haven't overclocked it.

I still think the chipset is an able chipset that can handle the demand of a heavier OS should the need arise.

I don't think Microsoft should base this upgrade based on the chipset age, rather base it on the ability of the chipset, which even the 4th or 5th generations can.

Granted I will be 8 years on this chip in 2024. But if its still working, why change? Or, in this case, be forced to change?

--- End quote ---

If you don't force people to change then they wont buy new products.  How do you think Apple get away with releasing a new iPhone seemingly every six months?  And people wonder why the ocean is full of plastic...

ChaChaMooMoo:

--- Quote from: Red Berry on June 26, 2021, 07:04:30 pm ---If you don't force people to change then they wont buy new products.  How do you think Apple get away with releasing a new iPhone seemingly every six months?  And people wonder why the ocean is full of plastic...

--- End quote ---

Electronic wastage, in this case, will become a bigger problem, if not one already. People will start dumping their old nonfunctional chips and then what?!? Wastage.

When there is an international chip shortage (like the one that's going on in automotive right now) people would be forced to pay 20-30% premium to get a chip just to ensure that their computers are still functional.

Seriously fuck Microsoft if they implement this. EU should do something about it.

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