Author Topic: sheff utd c*nts and that fucking rag  (Read 838 times)

Offline saph

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sheff utd c*nts and that fucking rag
« on: January 8, 2003, 10:28:53 PM »
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Pheeny

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Re:sheff utd c*nts and that fucking rag
« Reply #1 on: January 8, 2003, 11:06:00 PM »
Done!

Offline Mottman

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Re:sheff utd c*nts and that fucking rag
« Reply #2 on: January 8, 2003, 11:44:33 PM »
Eddie Spearitt and his son, Adam, went to a football game in Sheffield on April 15, 1989. They had been caught in traffic and had just enough time to find places in the allotted Liverpool terraces at Hillsborough stadium. Adam was fourteen and a devoted Liverpool supporter; and this was a critical FA Cup semi-final against Nottingham Forest.

'We were so excited,' said Eddie. 'It was only when the crowd in the pen really began to build up that I got frightened.' The ancient turnstiles became a bottle-neck as 5,000 Liverpool fans sought to gain entrance before the kick-off.

When the police eventually opened the main gates, instead of directing the fans to the open terraces, they sent them into the crowded pen. Eddie and Adam were crushed in each other's arms. Adam was one of ninety-six fans who died.

The subsequent inquiry by Lord Justice Taylor left no doubt where the blame lay. 'The real cause of the Hillsborough disaster', he said in his report, 'was overcrowding… the main reason for the disaster was the failure of police control.'

By the following Tuesday, the editor of the Sun, Kelvin MacKenzie, had convinced himself that the tragedy had been caused by Liverpool 'football hooligans'.

When he sat down to design his front page, he scribbled 'THE TRUTH' in huge letters. Beneath it he wrote three subsidiary headlines: 'Some fans picked pockets of victims' … 'Some fans urinated on the brave cops' … 'Some fans beat up PC giving kiss of life'.

The story described how 'drunken Liverpool fans viciously attacked rescue workers as they tried to revive victims' and 'police officers, firemen and ambulance crew were punched, kicked and urinated upon'. A dead girl was abused and fans, said an unnamed policeman, 'were openly urinating on us and the bodies of the dead'. A Tory MP, whose sole source was the police, was quoted.

None of it was true. There was no hooliganism. People were vomiting and behaving strangely because they had been crushed and traumatised. Others died because senior police officers failed to understand that the fans inside the pen were fighting for their lives, not trying to 'invade' the pitch.

'THE TRUTH' was the opposite. Like much in MacKenzie's Sun, it was clearly intended to pander to prejudice. Other journalists on the Sun appeared to know this instinctively. 'As MacKenzie's layout was seen by more and more people,' wrote Peter Chippendale and Chris Horrie in their history of the Sun, 'a collective shudder ran through the office [but] MacKenzie's dominance was so total there was nobody left in the organisation who could rein him in except Murdoch. [Everyone] seemed paralysed, "looking like rabbits in the headlights", as one hack described them. The error staring them in the face was too glaring … It obviously wasn't a silly mistake; nor was it a simple oversight. Nobody really had any comment on it - they just took one look and went away shaking their heads in wonder at the enormity of it … It was a "classic smear".'

I met Eddie Spearitt and two other Hillsborough parents: Phil Raymond, whose son Philip, also aged fourteen, died, and Joan Traynor, who lost two sons, Christopher, twenty-six, and Kevin, sixteen. We sat with coffee and sandwiches in a large sunlit room in the Philharmonic pub, which overlooks Liverpool.

Those who try to justify the substitution of a free press with a circus press that speaks to prejudice and 'gives people what they want', might listen to Eddie and Phil and Joan.

'As I lay in my hospital bed,' Eddie said, 'the hospital staff kept the Sun away from me. It's bad enough when you lose your fourteen-year-old son because you're treating him to a football match. Nothing can be worse than that. But since then I've had to defend him against all the rubbish printed by the Sun about everyone there being a hooligan and drinking. There was no hooliganism. During thirty-one days of Lord Justice Taylor's inquiry no blame was attributed because of alcohol. Adam never touched it in his life.'


Joan Traynor said that ITN had asked permission to film the funeral of her two sons. She refused and asked for her family's privacy to be respected. The Sun invaded the funeral, with photographers shooting from a wall. The picture of her sons' coffins on the front page of a paper that had lied about the circumstances of their death so deeply upset her that, eight years later, she has difficulty speaking about it. 'Is that what a newspaper is meant to do?' she asked.

Phil Hammond said, 'Like Eddie, the family kept the papers away from me. I've still got the papers in a white nylon bag in the loft. Take one of the Sun's lies; they said fans were robbing watches and money from the dead laid out on the pitch. I'm the secretary of the Family Support Group and every family has been in touch with me about that accusation. All of them have accounted for the possessions of their loved ones. Nothing was stolen.

'[The Sun said] that fans were urinating on the bodies. We got all the clothes back; they hadn't been washed; none of them smelt of urine. But some mud sticks, doesn't it, and there is always someone willing to pass it on. The Sun hurt us, and hurt us badly. We've had to defend the name of our loved ones when all they did was go to a football match and never come back.'

In the days that followed the tragedy, Billy Butler, a popular Radio Merseyside disc jockey, became a voice for Liverpool's grief and anger. 'There were newsagents calling in,' he told me, 'assuring people they would not stock the Sun. They were writing on their windows, "We do not have the Sun here". There was a public burning of the Sun in Kirkby. Caller after caller said they were boycotting the paper, and the boycott is still going on today. It's a marvellous way that ordinary people have to show their power, and this city used it."

Unlike the homes of the Hillsborough families, Kelvin MacKenzie's suburban home was not 'staked out' by a press mob. His chauffeured Jaguar routinely collected him every morning and took him to the Murdoch fortress at Wapping, east London, where, surrounded by razor wire and guards, he caught the lift to his windowless office and did not leave until the Jaguar took him home again.

However, sales of the Sun on Merseyside were falling fast, down by almost 40 per cent, a loss that would cost News International an estimated £10 million a year. When the Press Council subsequently condemned the Sun's lies, and the boycott intensified, Murdoch ordered MacKenzie to respond publicly. BBC Radio 4's The World This Weekend was chosen as his platform. The 'sarf London' accent that was integral to MacKenzie's persona as an 'ordinary punter' was now a contrite middle-class voice that fitted Radio 4.

'It was my decision', said MacKenzie, 'and my decision alone to do that front page in that way, and I made a rather serious error.' In 1996 MacKenzie was back on Radio 4, this time in a very different mood. 'The Sun did not accuse anybody of anything,' he said aggressively. 'We were the vehicle for others …' "We are in the entertainment industry"


IT WAS A LONG TIME AGO...BUT SOME OF US HAVE LONG MEMORIES.

NEVER BUY THE SUN
JFT 96


A boy from the Mersey and a Son of Shankly.

Offline Mottman

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Re:sheff utd c*nts and that fucking rag
« Reply #3 on: January 8, 2003, 11:52:14 PM »
April 15th 1989, saw the worst disaster in the history of English football; 96 Liverpool fans
attending their team's FA Cup semi-final against Nottingham Forest at Sheffield Wednesday's
ground, Hillsborough, were crushed to death on the Leppings Lane terrace, and English
football would never be the same again.

The disaster was basically caused by the failure of South Yorkshire Police to control a large
crowd of Liverpool fans outside the Leppings Lane End, and the poor state of the ground,
but it was also clear that football's total failure to learn from the numerous disasters that had
afflicted it during the twentieth century, and a police force conditioned to view supporters as
potential hooligans and so always expecting violence, contributed significantly to the 96 deaths
and many hundreds of injuries.

WHAT HAPPENED ON THE DAY?

Liverpool had been allocated the Leppings Lane End of the ground, and it was outside this end from, about 2.30pm that a large crowd of fans had built up. Fans were also delayed on their way to the game by roadworks on the M62 motorway. Warnings issued as far back as 1927 about the need to prevent a large build-up of supporters were ignored, and a sizeable crowd of thousands of Liverpool fans was allowed to build up outside the Leppings Lane End, leading to increasing congestion and then crushing at the front. Stewarding was also described as poor at this end of the ground. The police later claimed that fans had been drinking excessively.

The Leppings Lane gates led into a concourse: from this, fans could enter a main tunnel that
fed into pens three and four of the terrace. Additionally, there were access points to the left and right of the tunnel that led to the other pens on the Leppings Lane terrace. As the sections
immediately behind the goal, pens three and four were the most popular and were already full
over twenty minutes before kick-off, a fact noticed by BBC commentators in their build-up to the game, and by match commander Chief Superintendent David Duckinfield watching events from the police control box. Meanwhile, the crowd outside continued to build, with little effort made to prevent the numbers outside the gates swelling any further: the crushing outside was becoming progressively worse, police horses were becoming agitated, and 2.47pm, thirteen minutes before kick-off, police officers outside the Leppings Lane End radioed to Duckinfield (in charge of his first major match), informing him that the crushing was becoming severe, and that people were going to die if the gates were not opened to relieve the pressure. After a brief delay, Duckinfield ordered that Gate C be opened, and close on 2,000 Liverpool fans were directed through the gates into the concourse.

By now however, pens three and four were already over-congested; fans streamed into the tunnel, and then into pens three and four, creating a massive crush and trapping supporters at the front of the pens against the steel perimeter fence. Some estimates claim that there were twice the number of supporters in pens three and four than they were designed to cope with. The resultant crush became unbearable, with the fans at the back unable to see that the pens were already full, and the fans at the front already starting to show signs of distress and asphixiation.

Fans started to try and climb the fences to escape the pens, and some were lifted out of the pens by supporters in the tier above the terrace, but the crushing was becoming fatal as the game kicked off. Fans tried to attract the attention of police officers, but were unable to do so, and later complained that some supporters trying to escape the pens had been pushed back into the crowd by officers who seemed to think they were dealing with an attempted pitch invasion. Other fans reported shouting to police officers to open the gates, but simply being ignored. By 3.05pm, fans managed to alert Liverpool goalkeeper Bruce Grobbelaar, who in turn pointed out the problem to the referee, as fans were already making their way over the fences before collapsing on the side of the pitch. The players were taken off at 3.06, and the emergency operation began, with Liverpool fans ripping
up advertising hoardings to use as stretchers. It was becoming clear that this was going to be a major disaster, and there was later criticism of police officers who stood in a line across the half-way line, apparently to prevent any "charge" by Liverpool fans against the Forest supporters at the other end of the ground. Other junior officers climbed from pen two into pen three in an effort to help the victims by now piled up everywhere inside the pen, while others desperately tried to pull down the perimeter fence.

The game was abandoned at half-time, with fans, junior police officers and the emergency services still trying to get the injured to hospital, with some people still being admitted as late as 4pm. But in total, 95 fans died in the next couple of days, young, old, male, female. One more supporter, Tony Bland, died after spending four years on a ventilator machine.

At 3.15pm, Graham Kelly, chief executive of the Football Association, had gone to the police control box, where he was told by Duckinfield that Liverpool fans had rushed the gate into the ground, creating the fatal crush in pens three and four, despite the fact that he had ordered the gate opened.
At 4.15pm, Kelly was interviewed by the BBC, and he told them the police had implied to him that the gates had been opened unauthorised. The story flashed around the world that drunken Liverpool fans had forced the gates open, and it was splashed all over the newspapers the following morning. The suggestion that Liverpool fans were responsible for the disaster was picked up most strongly later that week by the 'Sun' newspaper, who ran maybe their most infamous headline on the personal instruction of editor Kelvin McKenzie. Acting on information from unnamed police officers, and entitled "The Truth", the 'Sun' claimed that drunken fans had forced the gates open because they did not have match-tickets, that they stolen from the corpses lying on the pitch, assaulted police officers and the emergency services, stolen cameras and other equipment from press photographers, and urinated on police officers helping the victims. Months later, the "Sun" admitted that the allegations were totally false, but it had already generated headlines all over the world, and the damage had been done.

THE TAYLOR REPORTS
The failure to close or block the tunnel leading into the already full pens three and four once the police had ordered Gate C to be opened was the immediate cause of the disaster, but the public inquiries set up by the Thatcher Government under Lord Justice Peter Taylor found, more generally, that football had simply not learned anything from the numerous disasters in its past, that it and the police were so obsessed with the threat of violence that they were unable to spot people in genuine danger of their lives, that police fundamentally lost control of the situation, and did not demonstrate the leadership expected of senior officers, that safety procedures were inadequate, that the ground was badly maintained and dangerous, that fans were routinely treated with contempt by football, and that fans had been the victims
rather the guilty party. His reports, published in August 1989 and January 1990, dismissed the allegations against Liverpool supporters for the disaster, and called instead for a total rethink in the industry's attitudes towards fans, and on the issue of safety. It also highlighted the failures by local authorities to check safety certificates for stadia (Sheffield Wednesday had redeveloped parts of the ground without obtaining a new safety certificate, or telling the emergency services: the result was that the safety certificate was outdated and useless, and that plans Sheffield Wednesday had developed with the local emergency services could not be put into practice, as the layout of the ground had changed).

Specifically, Taylor recommended the closure of terraces at all grounds, new safety measures on exits and entrances, and a new advisory committee on stadium design to ensure that best practice was followed. Crucially, Taylor also recommended that the Government's Identity Card scheme (whereby all fans would have to have a membership card to get into a ground) be dropped, on grounds of safety, a suggestion that the Government reluctantly carried out. Taylor's report did not have the force of law, and not all his recommendations were carried out, but his work in identifying the wider reasons for the disaster has been
acknowledged as one of the most significant turning points in the history of English football. The result was the total transformation of British stadia, paid for in large part by tax-payers' money, with terraces at grounds in the top two divisions closed by May 1994, and new safety regulations and regimes put in place at every stadium.

WHAT HAS HAPPENED SINCE 1989?
The controversy over the disaster has not subsided: Thatcher's Press Secretary, Bernard Ingham, has frequently repeated the allegations made by the 'Sun', as did Brian Clough (Nottingham Forest manager on the day of the disaster) some five years later; a boycott of the 'Sun' on Merseyside (that still goes on to this day) has cost its parent company News International tens of millions of pounds in lost revenue;

new Government enquiries were ordered to see if there was a case for criminal prosecutions (undertaken by Lord Justice Stuart-Smith); television documentaries and academics have alleged a systematic police cover-up (written evidence from junior officers to the Taylor enquiry was altered by superiors, for instance); and until 1999, Sheffield Wednesday refused to erect a memorial at the ground to the victims (leading to Liverpool fans boycotting Hillsborough in season 1998-99). Finally, in 2000, families of the victims brought
a private, civil prosecution against Duckinfield and his deputy Bernard Murray, for manslaughter.Murray was acquitted, but the jury were unable to reach a verdict in the case of Duckinfield, and the judge prevented a re-trial. Nonetheless, the Hillsborough Justice campaign remain determined to pursue the truth of what happened that day. Over a decade later, Hillsborough remains a highly controversial issue, with its effects most obvious at every stadium in the country.

Wear your badge with Pride.

Justice For the 96.


http://www.contrast.org/hillsborough/home.shtm
A boy from the Mersey and a Son of Shankly.

Pheeny

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Re:sheff utd c*nts and that fucking rag
« Reply #4 on: January 9, 2003, 12:22:07 PM »
Here is one of the replies I've had on the Sheffield United website with regards to my asking why there was a S*n advert.

Quote
I have a question which has bothered me for years:
When are Liverpool fans going to finally put the tradegy which happened at Hillsboro' in context and admit that it was actually caused by late arriving/drunk/ticketless Liverpool 'supporters' forcing their way into the ground, thereby causing the crush which killed the poor unfortunate souls who died?

   

Offline Sabbi yypia

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Re:sheff utd c*nts and that fucking rag
« Reply #5 on: January 9, 2003, 12:37:59 PM »
Here is one of the replies I've had on the Sheffield United website with regards to my asking why there was a S*n advert.

Quote
I have a question which has bothered me for years:
When are Liverpool fans going to finally put the tradegy which happened at Hillsboro' in context and admit that it was actually caused by late arriving/drunk/ticketless Liverpool 'supporters' forcing their way into the ground, thereby causing the crush which killed the poor unfortunate souls who died?

   

What a bloody wanker, why dont you refer him over here so we can he can be set straight

fucking ignorant sheep shagger

Offline Matt S

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Re:sheff utd c*nts and that fucking rag
« Reply #6 on: January 9, 2003, 12:41:45 PM »
Here is one of the replies I've had on the Sheffield United website with regards to my asking why there was a S*n advert.

Quote
I have a question which has bothered me for years:
When are Liverpool fans going to finally put the tradegy which happened at Hillsboro' in context and admit that it was actually caused by late arriving/drunk/ticketless Liverpool 'supporters' forcing their way into the ground, thereby causing the crush which killed the poor unfortunate souls who died?

   

Thats not the point even if he was right?

They sold lies about the tradgedy and that is why were boycotting them.

I know you know that but that sort of thing really pisses me off.

Offline MrDub

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Re:sheff utd c*nts and that fucking rag
« Reply #7 on: January 9, 2003, 01:42:49 PM »
JFT96

YNWA
"I always say the same thing. What is the difference between 4-3-3 and 4-5-1? Only whether you play the wingers deep or high. Then if you press the other team they will play deep, 4-5-1. And if you cannot press them because they are stronger than you, they'll play 4-3-3. People talk about systems, but maybe they don't know a lot about systems.

Offline Dan_L

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Re:sheff utd c*nts and that fucking rag
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2003, 09:38:44 AM »
Here is one of the replies I've had on the Sheffield United website with regards to my asking why there was a S*n advert.

Quote
I have a question which has bothered me for years:
When are Liverpool fans going to finally put the tradegy which happened at Hillsboro' in context and admit that it was actually caused by late arriving/drunk/ticketless Liverpool 'supporters' forcing their way into the ground, thereby causing the crush which killed the poor unfortunate souls who died?
 
Watched Football Extra on itv last night and saw the advertsing hoarding behind the goal with THE SCUM on it. Fuckin ignorant bastards.