Author Topic: The history of Liverpool FC in pictures  (Read 236828 times)

Offline Mottman

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #160 on: July 12, 2003, 06:11:56 PM »


A boy from the Mersey and a Son of Shankly.

Offline Mottman

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #161 on: July 12, 2003, 06:18:50 PM »


The Kop at Anfield dates back to 1905-06. At the end of that season which saw Liverpool lift the second of their league championships the directors at the club decided to reward the loyalty of the fans by building a new brick and cinder banking at the walton Breck road end of the ground. It was christened as the Spion Kop by Ernest Jones in memory of the many scousers who did in battle over a hill in South Africa by the same name during the Boer War.

In 1928 The Kop was altered to terracing and a massive roof added to protect the thousands of fans who gathered to watch their beloved team play. Other teams named their stands as the Kop but the one at Anfield was the original and the best.

The terrace housed the greatest fans in the game and it was often thought that the fans were worth a goal start to the reds. They would try and suck the ball in if their team was losing and in one of the Kops famous nights they put the fear of God into Inter Milan in a European semi-final.

The Kop was turned into a shrine in 1989 to the 96 fans who were innocently killed at Hillsborough. The fight for Justice still goes on today more than 10 years after the disaster. After the disaster new guidelines were issued about terracing at football games which brought to an end standing at top flight games. And so in 1994 the Kop changed from a terrace to an all-seater Kop Grandstand. The Kops Last Stand came against Norwich City in May 1994 and Jeremy Goss went down in history as the last player to score in front of the famous terrace.

Pieces of the Kop were put up for charitable sale when the terrace was demolished and some can still be bought in aid of the Forget-Me-Not Campaign.

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Offline Rushian

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #162 on: July 12, 2003, 07:16:29 PM »
John Barnes kicking racism out of football
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Offline IrishRed

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #163 on: July 12, 2003, 07:37:52 PM »
unbelievable thread.

possibily the best thing i have ever seen on the net.

every picture, every word = our history = awesome

actually had hairs on end reading robbie's post bout Shankly.

Legends - each and every one of them
LFC SHOULD NEVER PLAY ON THE 15TH APRIL, NOT THIS YEAR, NEXT YEAR OR ANY OTHER YEAR

Justice

Offline Em5y

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #164 on: July 12, 2003, 07:53:55 PM »

Offline Em5y

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #165 on: July 12, 2003, 08:10:05 PM »
King Kenny


Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #166 on: July 12, 2003, 10:04:20 PM »
Saturday April 26, 04:34 PM
Liverpool's Michael Owen celebrates scoring his 2nd goal of the game against West Bromwich Albion his 100 premiership goal - Soccer - FA Barclaycard Premiership - West Bromwich Albion v Liverpool


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Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #167 on: July 12, 2003, 10:49:32 PM »
Steve Heighway was once charged with the responsibility of providing the crosses for Liverpool's strikers to score the goals during one of the most successful periods in the club's history.
Now the seventies star has an equally important role to play as he helps to develop as many of the club's youngsters as possible with a view to as many of them as possible one day playing first team football.

Steve is Liverpool's Academy Director and, with his dedicated team at the fantastic Academy complex in Kirkby, he oversees an operation which caters for one hundred and fifty youngsters of all ages as they all pursue their dream of becoming a professional footballer.

'I love the job and I feel a great sense of responsibility towards the club,' says Steve. 'The board have shown considerable foresight by investing so heavily in the Academy and we each have a role to play now to repay that faith.

'Our record over the years of bringing our own players through is magnificent and we hope there are many more to come in the next few years.'

Heighway was signed as a player initially as an amateur, by Bill Shankly in 1970. It was actually Shankly's right hand man Bob Paisley who can claim a lot of the credit for bringing the 22-yar-old Heighway to Liverpool, as Paisley's sons spotted him playing against South Liverpool and recommended him to their father.

The endearing memory of Steve Heighway that most Liverpool fans will have, however, is his pace and ability down the wing, where he created hatfuls of goals for Kevin Keegan and John Toshack, as well as surpassing the 50 League goal mark for the club himself.

Upon retiring, he eventually returned to Anfield as the youth development officer in the 1980s, working alongside his old team mate Roy Evans, and leading Liverpool's Youth team to their first ever success in the FA Youth Cup in 1996.

Having brought through such immense talents as Robbie Fowler, Steve McManaman, Michael Owen, Jamie Carragher and Steven Gerrard, Dominic Matteo and David Thompson, Steve was instrumental in setting up the world-leading Anfield Academy which opened on January 20th 1999, and as Director of the Academy he continues to ensure a steady flow of the very finest young talent into the Liverpool first team.
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
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Offline Mottman

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #168 on: July 12, 2003, 11:10:21 PM »


The charismatic Welshman became a 'cult figure' on the Kop after his transfer from Wrexham, even though he only actually played for Liverpoolóduring three different seasons. Joey was an enthustiastic and tough-tackling left-back whose uncompromising style quickly endeared him to the Liverpool crowd.  

He was 20 years old when Bob Paisley signed him in the summer of 1975 and still a bit 'raw', whichóperhaps explained why - even though he started the season in the first-team - he only appeared in 13 First Division matches, one short agonisingly of the number required to qualify for a championship medal. The left-back role was also covered by Phil Neal & Alec Lindsay (briefly) in 1975-76 but a year later Joey had established himself in the first-team and only missed 3 of the 42 League fixtures. 1976-77 was his and Liverpool's greatest year of the decade; only Manchester United's victory in the F.A. cup final prevented it from being the greatest-EVER season in the club's history.  

But Joey was a member of the side that finally brought the European cup back to Anfield after their memorable triumph in Rome. Midway through the next season, Joey lost his place to the ageing but still dependable Tommy Smith and then subsequently to a young Alan Hansen. It was clear that his time at Anfield was drawing toóa close. He eventually rejoined Wrexham and later had spells at Chelsea and Huddersfield, where he was just as popular with the supporters as he had been on Merseyside.  

Joey finally returned to his first club for a second time before the 1987-88 season and when his playing career finally ended, he continued to work at The Racecourse Ground as a coach with the same enthusiasm that he had always displayed as a player. Joey was 'capped' over 70 times by his country and even though he figured in less than a hundred first-team games for Liverpool, he is still fondly remembered by the fans as one of the most colourful characters ever to pull on the famous red shirt.

 
A boy from the Mersey and a Son of Shankly.

Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #169 on: July 12, 2003, 11:11:25 PM »
1978 Euro cup winners shirt
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Offline Mottman

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #170 on: July 12, 2003, 11:14:44 PM »


DATE OF BIRTH 17/07/46  
GAMES 168 (9)  
GOALS 26  
HONOURS UEFA CUP 72/3
LGE CHAMPIONSHIP 72/3, 75/6
FA CUP 73/74  
INT'NAL HONS 9 SCOTLAND CAPS  
OTHER CLUBS HIBERNIAN (TWICE), NOTTS FOREST,
BRISTOL CITY  
 
Edinburgh-born midfielder Peter arrived at Anfield in July 1972 after having played 72 League games for Nottingham Forest and double that number for his home-town club Hibernian. His experience and creativity added something extra to the squad that had narrowly missed out on the championship in 1971-72 and Peter was an important part of Shankly's 'new' team which won not only the First Division title in 1972-73 but also the club's first-ever European trophy, the UEFA cup. Peter had to wait until the 7th League fixture of the season (at Derby's Baseball Ground) before being handed his League debut but he scored on his home debut against Wolves the following week and never looked back after that, finishing with 8 goals from his 30 starts plus another 22 appearances in the different cup competitions. 1973-74 was another good year for Peter. He figured in all 42 League matches and added an F.A. cup winners' medal to his collection.  

Aged 28 when the 1974-75 season began, he looked to have years of success ahead of him at Anfield but when Bob Paisley's master-stroke converted Ray Kennedy from a lumbering forward into a graceful midfielder, it was Peter who suffered as a consequence. He did qualify for another championship medal in 1975-76 after starting 16 League matches but was clearly surplus to requirements at Liverpool and it was no real surprise when he moved on to Bristol City in November 1976.  
 
Peter had a very unusual running action, he ran with his knees very high in the air, you would of have to have seen him to understand.
 
A boy from the Mersey and a Son of Shankly.

Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #171 on: July 12, 2003, 11:18:11 PM »
"If you're in the penalty area and
don't know what to do with the ball,
put it in the net and we'll discuss the options later."
~~ Bob Paisley
Justice for the 96.

Offline Mottman

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #172 on: July 12, 2003, 11:19:44 PM »


DATE OF BIRTH 06/10/48  
GAMES 217  
GOALS 5  
HONOURS UEFA 72/73
LGE CHAMPIONSHIP 72/73  
INT'NAL HONOURS 4 ENGLAND CAPS  
OTHER CLUBS BRISTOL ROVERS,  
COVENTRY,  
NOTTS FOREST,  
WIGAN  
 
Bill Shankly bought centre-half Larry Lloyd from Bristol Rovers in April 1969 as cover for big Ron Yeats, who was by then nearing the end of his Liverpool career. Larry played in two consecutive League games in the Autumn of 1969 but was selected for the last 6 First Division matches of that 1969-70 season in the aftermath of the humbling F.A. cup defeat at Watford, although he had actually made his first-team debut in a European Fairs cup tie at Dundalk the previous September.  
Yeats filled in occasionally at left-back in the 1970-71 season, leaving the tall Bristolian free to establish himself at the heart of Liverpool's defence. He only missed 2 League fixtures that year and helped his young side reach the F.A. cup final, where they were beaten in extra-time by Arsenal. More disappointment followed a year later when a disallowed 'goal' a few minutes from the end of the final League game cost them the championship. But in 1972-73 those near misses were forgotten as Liverpool captured a championship and UEFA cup 'double', with Larry playing in every single one of the 66 competitive matches the club played during that draining season and also scoring the winning goal in the European final against Monchengladbach.  

Lloyd was still very much first-choice at the start of the next season and played in 27 consecutive First Division games up to and including the home fixture with Norwich City on 2nd February 1974. He was substituted by Peter Cormack on that day and the Scot scored the last-minute winner to keep Liverpool just about in touch with Leeds at the top of the table.  Cormack replaced Lloyd from that moment on, numerically if not positionally, and the club made it known that they were prepared to listen for offers for a man who was still only 25 years old and had several good years ahead of him. Coventry City were prepared to pay what was for the time a very high fee, even considering the player's age, and Larry left Anfield for Highfield Road in August 1974.  

He stayed at Coventry for two seasons before moving on to Nottingham Forest, where he achieved even greater success than he had on Merseyside, twice being a member of a European cup-winning side and winning another League championship medal. He moved to Wigan as player-manager in March 1981 and although he took the Lancashire club into the Third Division a year later, he was dismissed the following season. He also had a short spell in charge of Notts. County before retiring from the game and concentrating on his new life as a publican in the Nottingham area.  

Larry "Valentine" Lloyd.

 
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Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #173 on: July 12, 2003, 11:20:20 PM »
Billy Liddell, wonderful winger and centre forward. He scored almost willingly during his seasons with the Reds, many of which are spent out of Division 1.

After WWII, Liverpool fared rather badly in the league. They did play in the FA Cup Final in 1950 against a strong Arsenal side. The Reds lost 2-0. In 1952, manager George Kay retired due to ill health after managing the team for 15 years. Subsequently, Don Welsh succeeded Kay as manager.

In the 1952-53 season, Welsh's Liverpool side narrowly avoided relegation. However, they would not be so lucky the following season, finishing last in Division 1, Liverpool would played in Division 2 for the first time in 50 years. In 1955, Liverpool finished 11th in Division 2, lowest position in the Reds history ever. Soon after, Welsh became the first Liverpool manager to be sacked in 1956.

During these years in both divisions, Billy Liddell provided thrills to the crowd. Liddell despite the team's poor performance still fascinated the loyal Anfield crowd then. Without him, Liverpool could have declined further. Also in the side during the years in Division 2 was Ronnie Moran, long time servant of the club. (he recently retired after more than 30 years of association with the club)

Justice for the 96.

Offline Mottman

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #174 on: July 12, 2003, 11:24:11 PM »


DATE OF BIRTH 27/02/48  
GAMES 244 (2)  
GOALS 18  
HONOURS UEFA CUP 72/73
LGE CHAMPIONSHIP 72/73
FA CUP 73/74  
INT'NAL HONS 4 ENGLAND CAPS  
OTHER CLUBS BURY, STOKE CITY,  
OAKLAND (USA)  
 
 
Left-back Alec was signed by Liverpool from his home-town club Bury in March 1969 when he was 21 years old. Bill Shankly gave him his first-team debut in a 10-0 Fairs Cup thrashing of Dundalk in September that year but he didn't taste any First Division action until the middle of October, when he came off the bench to strike an equaliser against Ipswich Town at Portman Road. But that was one of just 6 First Division matches he figured in that season.  
The left-back slot was a 'problem position' for the club at that time; no fewer than four men - Ian Ross, Roy Evans, Ron Yeats & Alec Lindsay - played there at different stages of the 1970-71 season but by the end of the year it was Alec who had got the vote and he was picked for the 1971 F.A. cup final against Arsenal. He only missed 4 League matches the following season and just 5 in 1972-73, when he was an important part of the team which won the League championship and UEFA cup. His strong left-foot brought him 5 goals that season and he also took over from Kevin Keegan as the club's penalty-taker a year later.  

That was also the season when he wiped out the disappointment of the cup final defeat to Arsenal in 1971 by being a member of the side that outplayed Newcastle United at Wembley. In that game, with the score still locked at 0-0, his strong run and thunderous shot into Iam McFaul's net was harshly deemed to be offside, when television replays later showed that the ball had come to him not from Kevin Keegan but a Newcastle defender.  

Alec lost his place to Phil Neal, Bob Paisley's first signing, mid-way through the 1974-75 season but remained at Anfield until August 1977 when he was transferred to Stoke City. He always enjoyed his football and received four international caps, a run which allegedly began when Joe Mercer was caretaker England manager and whilst deliberating on his squad for a forthcoming European summer tour said to one of his colleagues "Let's have that Lindsay from Liverpool. He's always smiling"!  After finishing his playing days in the Potteries, Alec returned to the North-West and became a publican in Leigh.

Alec had a shot 2nd to none.
 
 
A boy from the Mersey and a Son of Shankly.

Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #175 on: July 12, 2003, 11:26:29 PM »
Kevin Keegan Scunthorpe United to Liverpool May 1971 If Alan Ball's dad (also called Alan) had been able to persuade Preston's chainnan to scrape together another 5,000 pounds, the history of English football might have been rather different. But Ball Snr, then boss at Deepdale, had no such luck. So when Kevin Keegan left Scunthorpe travelled not to Deepdale but to Anfield, in a transfer of such ludicrous value that Bill Shankly described it as 'robbery with violence'. Even without Preston's lack of cash, Keegan might not have got his dream move but for the luck of a Cup draw. When Scunthorpe took Tramnere to a second replay in the 1970-71 FA Cup, the neutral venue chosen was Goodison Park - right on Shankly's doorstep. Bob Paisley had already recommended the young winger to his boss, but Keegan played well enough at Goodison for Shankly not to dispute his assistant's verdict. The rest is history: a goal after seven minutes on the opening day of the 1971/72 season, 100 goals in 321 games for Liverpool, an almost telepathic understanding with strike partner John Toshack, three League titles, two Uefa Cups, a European Cup and an FA Cup. When Keegan finally moved to Hamburg (where he would win two European Footballer Of The Year titles) in summer 1977, Liverpool were able to pocket a transfer fee of 500,000 pounds a 1,429 per cent profit.

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Offline Mottman

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #176 on: July 12, 2003, 11:27:40 PM »


GAMES 109  
GOALS 37  
HONOURS  
INT'NAL HONOURS    
OTHER CLUBS   TRANMERE, PORT VALE  
 
Liverpool-born Cyril scored on his League debut for Liverpool as an 18 year old forward, netting the only goal of the game when Chelsea were the visitors to Anfield on 2nd September 1939. But the outbreak of the Second World War meant that this was the final competitive fixture for several years, the regular divisions being abandoned in favour of regional leagues and cup competitions. When League football resumed after the war ended, Cyril made an important contribution by scoring 10 times from 17 appearances (includingþhat-tricks against Huddersfield & Grimsby) as theþReds marched on to the First Division championship. He was in and out of the team over the next five years and missed out completely on the F.A. cup run which took the club to their first Wembley final in 1950. Cyril moved to Tranmere Rovers in May 1952 and scored nearly 100 League goals for them and Port Vale, the club at which he ended his playing career.
 
A boy from the Mersey and a Son of Shankly.

Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #177 on: July 12, 2003, 11:33:39 PM »

 John Toshack

Info

Name: John Toshack (OBE)
Date of Birth: 22/03/49
Height: 6' 1"
Nationality: Welsh
Position: Striker
Playing clubs : Cardiff City, Liverpool, Swansea City.
Management: Swansea City, Sporting Lisbon, Real Sociedad (twice), Real Madrid (twice), Wales, Deportivo La Coruna, Beskitas

Footballing history (before Swansea): Toshack started his playing carear at 16 years old for Cardiff city, he impressed Bill Shankly a few years later and was signed to play for Liverpool for the fee of £110,000 in November 1970, he did not become a first team regular until he formed a striking partnership with Kevin Keegan which became one of the greatest in the history of the club.

Keegan's arrival was perfect for Toshack and the pair have been described as the 'Little and Large' strike force of that time, there was an almost telepathic understanding between them for setting up and scoring goals.Toshack was brilliant at scoring with his head and became a major factor in helping Liverpool win league titles and cup prizes including two Eurpoean cups. After 7 years at the Kop he scored a total of 96 goals.

 
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Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #178 on: July 12, 2003, 11:54:38 PM »
On his day, there can be little doubt that John Barnes has been one of the supreme talents to grace the post-war game in England. Nurtured by Graham Taylor during Watford's dramatic ascent through the divisions, he drove the Hertfordshire club to the 1984 FA Cup Final, single-handedly destroying Birmingham City in the quarter-finals of the competition. Although Watford were beaten by Everton at Wembly, Barnes had done enough to establish himself as one of the outstanding prospects in the country and a natural choice for England.

In one of his early games for the national side, Barnes scored an individual goal that has been described as the best ever seen in Brazil's Maracana Stadium. A solo effort that cannot be diminished - however often it is viewed - it made his eventual departure from humble Vicarage Road inevitable. Thus it was that Barnes made the trip north to Anfield, a £900,000 cheque making the opposite journey.

As Barnes join Dalglish's army of big-money buys, some critics voiced doubts over the deal. Despite his stunning display at the Maracana, Barnes had been a profound disappointment in most of his displays in a white shirt: would he similarly struggle on the big stage at Anfield?

Such negative voices were soon silenced, for in his early years at the club no player could claim to generate such consistent excitement as Barnes. This marriage of excellence and reliability would make Barnes the lynchpin of a side that would conquor all before them in the 1987-1988 season.

legend has it, Liverpool, having just lost the title to Everton, asked their squad which three players had caused them the most hassle the previous season. Barnes, Houghton and Beardsley topped the list, these players were purchased, and Liverpool over the next two seasons put out a side that I've not seen bettered before or since.



 

 

 

« Last Edit: July 13, 2003, 12:01:11 AM by RedBoywonder »
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Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #179 on: July 13, 2003, 12:09:02 AM »
'My idea was to build Liverpool into a bastion of invincibility. Napoleon had that idea; he wanted to conquer the bloody world. I wanted Liverpool to be untouchable. My idea was to build Liverpool up and up until eventually everyone would have to submit and give in.'
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Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #180 on: July 13, 2003, 12:11:14 AM »
Worthy Cup Final Flag 2003
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Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #181 on: July 13, 2003, 12:12:48 AM »
Warm up before League cup final 2003
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Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #182 on: July 13, 2003, 12:17:06 AM »
Stevie Gerard after just scoring a goal against united in the 2003 League cup final.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2003, 12:18:56 AM by RedBoywonder »
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Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #183 on: July 13, 2003, 12:18:25 AM »
The two goal scorers hold aloft the League cup.
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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #184 on: July 13, 2003, 12:21:19 AM »
Gerrard Houlier (OBE) with the League cup 2003
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Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #185 on: July 13, 2003, 12:22:14 AM »
"This one's for you" Ged tells the travelling kopites.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2003, 12:23:41 AM by RedBoywonder »
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Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #186 on: July 13, 2003, 12:27:08 AM »
A record breaking seventh win.
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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #187 on: July 13, 2003, 12:29:05 AM »
Thomo & Sammy
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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #188 on: July 13, 2003, 12:31:16 AM »
The cup
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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #189 on: July 13, 2003, 12:36:34 AM »
"You'll never walk alone"
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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #190 on: July 13, 2003, 12:37:59 AM »
A special bond exsists between our two clubs.
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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #191 on: July 13, 2003, 12:39:06 AM »
What other set of supporters would wear the opposing teams scarf?
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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #192 on: July 13, 2003, 12:41:16 AM »
I'd stick to managing if I where you Ged! ;)
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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #193 on: July 13, 2003, 12:43:10 AM »
"Stand up pinnochio"
Justice for the 96.

Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #194 on: July 13, 2003, 12:45:06 AM »
Good cop, bad cop.
Justice for the 96.

Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #195 on: July 13, 2003, 12:46:47 AM »
How the fuck am I supposed to turn Heskey into a lethal hitman?  ;D
Justice for the 96.

Offline Mottman

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #196 on: July 13, 2003, 12:50:02 AM »


Howard Gayle's Liverpool career comprised just five first team appearances. Not exactly the stuff of legends, you might think. But cast your mind back to April 1981, to a balmy spring evening in the Olympic Stadium, Munich, and think again.

The occasion was, of course, the European Cup semi-final second leg against the mighty Bayern. A date in Paris was the prize on offer and, following a goalless first leg at Anfield, the Germans were hot favourites to claim it. What followed was one of the most famous nights in Liverpool's rich European history. Against all odds a place in the Final was secured. Bob Paisley rated it the club's finest performance in Europe and later admitted that without the contribution of Gayle it may never have been achieved.

Then a reserve team regular, with just 19 minutes previous first team experience under his belt, he was the shock inclusion in the squad that travelled to Munich.

"It came as a great surprise and I was made up just to be part of the travelling squad. I had no idea whatsoever that I'd play a part."

An injury ravaged Liverpool side was seemingly on a hiding to nothing, especially when Dalglish limped off in the early stages. It was the cue for Bob Paisley to unleash the virtually unknown Gayle onto Liverpool's unsuspecting opponents.

"When Roy Evans told me I was going on I just gave him a wry look because I thought he was winding me up. When I realised Roy was being serious it took only a matter of seconds to strip off and then I was out there. I wasn't nervous because there was no time for nerves."

Gayle made a dramatic entrance. He terrorised the Germans with his blistering pace and dazzling ball control, while his frequent probing forays into Bayern territory silenced the vast home crowd. The experienced Munich defenders were clearly rattled. So much so that they responded by trying to kick lumps out of the rookie winger.

"B reitner had slaughtered us after the first leg. He told the German media how poor we were and what Bayern were going to do to us in the return. When Kenny went off everyone must have been writing off our chances. Ronnie Moran told me to stay wide and keep going at them and it worked. I remember ripping them to bits and we should have had a penalty in the first half when I was blatantly brought down."

In the face of such brutal intimidation Gayle's hot temperament eventually got the better of him and, after being booked, there was every danger of him receiving his marching orders. Wisely, Gayle was substituted, having successfully completed the task that was required of him. He'd run the Bayern defence ragged and paved the way for Ray Kennedy's crucial strike seven minutes from time.

Of course, Gayle's niche in the Liverpool record books was assured even before his heroics in Munich. He was the first black player to ever play for the club and it's a claim to fame that he cherishes.

"I was, and still am, very proud of that fact. I could lose my medals but the one thing that can't be taken away from me is that I was the first black player to represent Liverpool."

Born and bred in Toxteth, Gayle is a lifelong Liverpudlian. In November 1977 he realised his boyhood dream when John Bennison spotted him playing for Sunday League side Bedford. A lengthy apprenticeship in the Reds reserve side followed, as did a loan spell at Fulham, before Gayle made his long awaited competitive first team debut as a substitute at Maine Road in October 1980.

Six months later, in the aftermath of the Bayern game, Gayle was handed his first senior start. He celebrated by scoring in a 1-1 draw at Tottenham and with the European Cup Final only a matter of weeks away there was genuine talk of him making the starting line up against Real Madrid.

"If I had been at any other club I would have been disappointed. There was a famous old saying at Liverpool that one swallow doesn't m ake a summer. And it's right. I've seen players at Liverpool score hat tricks on their debuts and then find themselves out of the team for the next game," he says philosophically.
 
"The competition for striking places against Real Madrid was fierce. As a professional I have to say I would've loved to have played but as a fan I was content to be on the bench, fortunate to be in a position where thousands of others would have loved to have been."

Unfortunately, the touchline of the Parc des Prince was the closest Gayle would get to another first team outing and the following season saw him fade back in to Central League obscurity.

In January 1983, after another loan spell this time at Newcastle, he finally admitted defeat in his battle for a regular first team place at Anfield and reluctantly left his beloved Reds for good, joining Birmingham City for £75,000. It was a heart wrenching decision for him to make.

"I loved the club and it was never about wages and money with me. I hated the thought of leaving Liverpool and was gutted when I eventually left, although it was my own decision to leave. When you've had a taste of first team football it's very hard to go back to playing in front of a couple of hundred fans in the reserves."

At St Andrews, Gayle, at last, enjoyed a prolonged run of regular first team football and won two England under-21 caps in the process. He moved on to Sunderland, with whom he played at Wembley in the Milk Cup Final, before playing out his career in the lower leagues with Blackburn, Stoke and Halifax.

Sadly, the early promise he had shown in Munich was never fulfilled. At Anfield though, his European heroics against Bayern in 1981 will never be forgotten.

Well in Howard, I'll never forget Munich in 1981, worth every penny mate.
A boy from the Mersey and a Son of Shankly.

Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #197 on: July 13, 2003, 12:51:56 AM »
As another bullet flies into the top corner of the net, Stevie G tells everyone who the scorer is.
Justice for the 96.

Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #198 on: July 13, 2003, 12:54:57 AM »
You can stick ya Russian billionair up ya arse!  ;)
Justice for the 96.

Offline RedBoywonder

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Re:The history of Liverpool FC in pictures
« Reply #199 on: July 13, 2003, 01:02:33 AM »
Moores--- "Tell Prof John McKenzie we'll give him £5M for Kewell"

Parry --- "He'll never go for that, He's not fuckin stupid"  ;) ;D
Justice for the 96.